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Full text of "Rice University General announcements"

RICE UNIVERSITY 

GENERAL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
1992 ♦ 1993 




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Rice University 
General Announcements 
1992-93 






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RICE 



NOTE: This catalog represents the most accurate information available at the time 
of publication. However, it necessarily cannot reflect changes in staff and costs over 
the longer term. As far as courses are concerned, the departments have used their 
best judgment in anticipating which courses will be offered over the one-year period 
and when they will be offered. Despite their best efforts, though, the inevitable 
changes in faculty as well as student demand and even funding, in some cases, may 
affect course offerings. A good faith effort has been made to indicate these 
uncertainties appropriately; however, these provisions are subject to change without 
notice. 

Offices to contact for additional information: 

Mailing Address: Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251 

Location: 6100 South Main, Houston, Texas 

Telephone: (713) 527-8101 

Please address all correspondence to the appropriate office or department followed by 

the University mailing address given above. 



Admission, Catalogs, Applications 



Office of Admission 

109 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4036 



Business Matters 



Office of the Cashier 

1 10 Allen Center; (713) 527-4946 



Career Services. Part-time 
Employment off Campus 

Continuing Education 



Career Services Center 

Rice Memorial Center; (713) 527-4055 

Office of Continuing Studies 

(713) 527-4803 

Center for Continuing Studies 



Credits, Transcripts 



Office of the Registrar 

1 16 Allen Center; (713) 527-4999 



Financial Aid, Scholarships. 
Part-time Employment on Campus 



Financial Aid Office 

201 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4958 



Graduate Study 



Chair of the Appropriate 
Department 



Undergraduate and 
Graduate Students, 
Undergraduate Curricula 



Office of the Vice-President for 

Student Affairs 

101 Lovett Hall; (713) 527-4996 



Rice University seeks to attract to its faculty, staff', and student body qualified persons 
of diverse backgrounds. In accordance with this policy. Rice does not discriminate in 
admissions, educational programs, or employment against any individual on the basis 
of race, color, religion, sex, sexual preferance, national or ethnic origin, age, 
disability, or veteran status. University policy also includes affirmative action in 
seeking to recruit, hire, and advance women, minority group members, individuals 
with disabilities. Vietnam era veterans, and special disabled veterans. 



Table of Contents 



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The University and the Campus 1 

Administration and Staff 

Board of Governors 4 

Administration 6 

Administrative Offices 6 

College Masters and Comasters 7 

Rice University Associates 8 

Instructional and Research Staff 14 

Professional Staff 59 

Standing Committees 65 

Chairs and Lectureships 66 

Information for Undergraduate Students 

Degree Requirements, Majors, and Curricula 69 

Academic Regulations 90 

Academic Advising and Tutorial Programs 99 

Admission of New Students 100 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 107 

Financial Aid 110 

Scholarships and Awards 113 

Honor Societies 124 

Student Life 125 

Information Systems 132 

Information for Graduate Students ''-'^"^'*^ "uo.sfi.^i 

Research Degrees 135 

Professional Degrees 136 

Admission to Graduate Study 142 

Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 146 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes 147 

Financial Aid 150 

Student Life 151 

Courses of Instruction 

Explanation of Numbering System 153 

Accounting and Administrative Science 154 

Ancient Mediterranean Civilization 168 

Anthropology 171 



Architecture '. ....!. ..;..l'...'.'.r.. !!.....'...' 185 

Art and Art History 198 

Asian Studies 213 

Biosciences 217 

Chemical Engineering 228 

Chemistry 234 

Civil Engineering 240 

Classics 246 

Cognitive Sciences 250 

Computational & Applied Mathematics 254 

Computer Science 262 

Economics 271 

Education 280 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 286 

English 297 

Environmental Science and Engineering 307 

French Studies 312 

Geology and Geophysics 324 

German and Slavic Studies 333 

Hispanic and Classical Studies 347 

History 354 

Human Performance and Health Sciences 379 

Humanities 385 

Linguistics and Semiotics 388 

Managerial Studies 398 

Mathematics 401 

Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 406 

Medieval Studies 416 

Military Science 423 

Music 426 

Natural Science 444 

Naval Science 445 

Philosophy 448 

Physics 452 

Policy Studies 458 

Political Science 460 

Psychology 470 

Religious Studies 479 

Social Sciences 490 

Sociology 491 

Space Physics and Astronomy 498 

Statistics 503 

Study of Women and Gender 508 

Academic Calendar 51 1 

Index :::;:..;........:: .■.!.'". V.:^ 512 



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The University and 
tlie Campus 



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Dedicated to the "the advancement of letters, science, and art," Rice is private, 
independent, nonsectarian, and coeducational. It includes among its academic 
divisions both undergraduate and graduate studies in the humanities, social 
sciences, natural sciences, engineering, architecture, administrative sciences, and 
music. . 

Highly talented students with diverse interests are attracted to Rice by the 
opportunities for creative learning. They find rewarding student-faculty relationships, 
options for individually tailored programs of study, opportunities for research, coop- 
erative activities with other institutions in the nation's fourth largest city, and the 
unique experience of residential colleges. 

About 65 percent of Rice's 2,700 undergraduate students live on campus in the 
eight residential colleges. The colleges have independent student governments, plan 
social functions, field intramural teams, and sponsor innovative academic courses, 
distinguished speakers, plays, and other functions. In each college, the college master, 
comaster, and approximately 20 faculty associates act as advisers to the students. This 
system provides students and faculty with a style of living in keeping with the tenets 
of fine education. 

Rice's approximately 1,300 graduate students work closely with faculty mem- 
bers who are eminent in their fields and conduct innovative research to extend the 
horizons of current knowledge. Graduate students live off campus or in the University- 
owned Graduate House. The Graduate Student Association organizes and funds 
regular social activities and provides graduate students with a separate organization 
to represent their interests within the University. 

A look through the archway of Lovett Hall shows even the casual visitor why the 
300-acre Rice campus is widely acclaimed for its dignified yet casual beauty. 
Approximately 40 permanent buildings are conveniently grouped in quadrangles 
under graceful live oak trees. The city's largest stadium, Fondren Library, the Media 
Center, the computer center, and Alice Pratt Brown Hall, with its dramatic musical 
presentations make Rice "behind the hedges" a community unto itself. Yet, only three 
miles from downtown Houston, Rice students enjoy all the commercial and cultural 
advantages of a major metropolitan center. 



Rice University Campus Map 




Building Key 

1 Lo\ ctt Hall 

2 Sew all Hall 
3. Ravz( 
4 Fond 
5. Anderson Hall 
6 rh\sics Laboratories 

7. Ralph S. OXx 

8. Brown House 

9. Margarett Root Brown College 

10. Jones House 

1 1 . Mar>' Gibbs Jones College 

12. Facilities and Hngineering 

13. Central Kitchen 

15. Bonner Nuclear Research Laboraton 

16. Abercrombic Engineering Laborator)' 

17. Mechanical Laboratory' 

18. Pvvon Engineering Laboraton' 

19. Mudd Building 
20 Hamman Hall 
2L Mechanical Engineering Building 
22- Herman Brown Hall 
23 Dell Butcher Hall 

24. George R. Brown Hall 

25. Space Science Building 

26. Keith-Wiess Geological Laboratorii 

27. Anderson Biological Labi 

28. Rice Memorial Chapel 

29. Rice Memorial C enter 

30. Lev Student Center 

31. HernneHall 

32. Alice Pratt Brown Hal! 

33. Cohen H 

34. Allen Center tor Business Acth'ities 

35. James A. Baker College 

36. Baker House 
3,7. VViess House 
38. Harn C. Wiess College 
39 Edgar Odell Lovett College 
40. Lovett House 



Will Rice College 
Will Rice House 
Harr^ C. Hansz. 
Hanszen House 
Sid W. Richardsc 
Richardson House 
Graduate House 
Gymnasium and Autry Court 
Rjce Media Center 



Parking Key 

A Brown College Residents Lot 
> College Residents Lot 

Abercrombie Lot 

Commuting Students East Stadium Lot 

Bonner Lot 

North Lot 

Nonh V'isitiors Lot 

Herring Hall Lot 

Laboraton- Road Lot 
R Baker College-Food and Housing Lot 
L Central Visitors Lot 
LH Lovett Hall Lot 
M Allen Center-C'ohen House Lot 
MV Cohen House Visitors Lot 
N Autr\' Court Ix>t 
P Main Street Lt>t 

Will Rice College Residents Lot 

en-Wiess Colleges Residents Lot 
S Richardson College Residents Lot 
SF Alice Pratt Brow n Hail Lot 
T Ryon-Mechanical Labor^rorv' Lot 
L' Facilities and Engineering Lot 
V Biolog\'-Geology Lot 
W Conrinuing Studies-Media Center Lot 
WS West Stadium I^t 
X Lovett College Residents Lot 



I College 
1 C'ollege 



49, 

50. Center for Co 

5 1 . Campus Polio 

52. Athletic Office 

53. Rice Stadium 

54. MailSe^^icc 

55. Administrativt 

56. NanROTC 



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Administration 
and Staff 



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Board of Governors 



Trustees 

Charles W. Duncan, Jr., Chair 
Josephine E. Abercrombie, 

Vice-Chair 
D. Kent Anderson 
J. Evans Attwell 



John L. Cox 
Burton J. McMurtry 
Jack T. Trotter 



Term Members 

E. William Bamett 
James W. Glanville 
William P. Hobby 
A. L. Jensen 



George R. Miner 
Paula M. Mosle 
James L. Pate 
Selby W. Sullivan 



Alumni Governors 

T. Robert Jones 
Albert N. Kidd 



G. Walter McReynolds 
Steven J. Shaper 



Trustees Emeriti 

E. D. Butcher 
Harry J. Chavanne 
Oveta Culp Hobby 
C. M. Hudspeth 



Edward W. Kelley, Jr. 
H. Malcolm Lovett 
Ralph S. O'Connor 
James U. Teague 



Governor Advisors 

J. D. Bucky Allshouse 
Judy Ley Allen 
Richard A. Chapman 
Stephen C. Cook 
Thomas H. Cruikshank 
James A. Elkins III 
J. Thomas Eubank 



William S. Parish III 
Catherine C. Hannah 
Joyce Pounds Hardy 
James W. Hargrove 
Gerald D. Hines 
Paul N. Howell 
Carl lUig 






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JackS.Josey Ralph W. Noble II 

Howard B. Keck - Haylett O'Neill, Jr. 

Baine P. Kerr M. Kenneth Oshman 

William F. Kieschnick J. Howard Rambin 

Neal T. Lacey. Jr. ' David L. Rooke 

Wendel D. Ley ^^ ;^ • ; Frank B. Ryan 

J. Hugh Liedtke ' Louisa Stude Sarofim 

William M. McCardell Harry K. Smith 

Jerry McCleskey no;' ;-t], jhomas Smith tO' m?0!. 

J. W. McLean Louis D. Spaw. Jr. ^^-'[ ;7^-''' 

James R. Meyers '^■'^^'"' Karl C. ten Brink '^'-'''' ^^^ 

Pat H. Moore ,,;""r'^'" James O. Winston. Jr. 

S. I. Morris .'....... Benjamin N. Woodson 

Walter D. Murphy gnpn'^nign-j Helen S. Worden ■\^j'^u -■ 

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6 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Administration 



President George Rupp 

Provost Neal F. Lane 

Vice President for Research and Information Technology G. Anthony Gorry 

Vice-President for Student Affairs Ronald F. Stebbings 

Vice-President for Finance and Administration Dean Currie 

Vice-President for External Affairs Frank B. Ryan 

Treasurer and Vice-President for Investments Scott W. Wise 

Dean of the School of Humanities Allen J. Matusow 

Dean of the Wiess School of Natural Sciences James L. Kinsey 

Dean of the George R. Brown School of Engineering Michael M. Carroll 

Dean of the School of Social Sciences James R. Pomerantz 

Dean of the School of Architecture to be named 

Dean of the Shepherd School of Music Michael Hammond 

Dean of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School 

of Administration Benjamin F. Bailar 

Dean of Admission and Records Richard N. Stabell 

Dean of the School of Continuing Studies Mary B. Mclntire 

Dean of Students Sarah A. Burnett 



Administrative Offices 



Administrative Computing Francisco Porras 

Admission Ron W. Moss 

Affirmative Action Paula Cox and Deborah Nelson 

Alumni Association Scott Biddy 

Athletics John R. May 

Career Services Robert D. Sanborn 

Cashier Patricia C. Ciampi 

Comptroller Nicolo Messana 

Computer Services Priscilla J. Huston 

Counseling Lindley Doran 

Development Office Mark E. Kimbel! 

Financial Aid G. David Hunt 

Fondren Library Beth J. Shapiro 

Food and Housing Marion O. Hicks 

General Counsel Shirley R. Redwine 

Graduate Studies Graham P. Glass 

Health Cynthia Lanier 

Human Resources Caroline Garcia 

Multicultural Affairs Catherine E. Clack 

Minority Graduate Student Affairs Richard A. Tapia 

Networking and Planning Farrell E. Gerbode 

News and Publications Michael Berryhill 



l^AT?:a/!AV!OtTA>!T2imf^ 7 

Registrar James G. Williamson 

Secretary of the Faculty Linda P. Driskill 

Sponsored Research .iai:.%,v.'.. Jean E. Vorhaben 

Student Activities .......'../.. Sarah Crawford 

Student Advising Patricia S. Martin 

Student Health Services Amanda Shnee, M.D. 

University Police Department Mary M. Voswinkel 

College Masters and Comasters r ' ^^ nqiorfr:- 

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Baker College Rob and Robyn Dunbar 

Brown College John and Carolyn Brelsford 

Hanszen College Dennis Huston and Lisa Bryan 

Jones College David and Caroline Minter 

Lovett College Susan Wood 

Richardson College Gordon and Susan Wittenberg 

Wiess College George and Marilyn Pharr 

Will Rice College Dennis Shirley and Shelley Cochran 

Graduate House Master Robert L. Patten 



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8 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Rice University Associates Mr. and Mrs. C. Richard Everett I 

Mr. Garland W. Fielder 3 

REGULAR MEMBERS Mr. and Mrs. Don E. Fizer 

Mr. and Mrs. Horace P. Flatt 

tfCij'dfjS ^^- ^"*^ Mrs. James P. Fogarty > 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Abendshein Mr. and Mrs. Larry D. Floumoy 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Bucky Allshouse Mr. Thomas Fomoff and Ms. Valerie 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Dennis Anderson Luessenhop 

Mr. and Mrs. William Spom Arendale, Mr. and Mrs. Orville D. Gaither 

Jr. Mr. and Mrs. David Kent Gibbs 

Mr. and Mrs. Khleber Attwell. Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Louis J. Girard 

Dr. and Mrs. H. Randolph Bailey Mr. and Mrs. L. Henry Gissel, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Baillio, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Melbem G. Glasscock 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Barksdale III Mr. E. Forbes Gordon 

Mr. and Mrs. E. William Bamett Mr. and Mrs. Matt Gorges 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Beamon ■ Dr. Milton J. Guiberteau ■ 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Benzon Mr. and Mrs. Billy E. Hale 

Dr. Thomas M. Biggs Dr. and Mrs. R. Dennis Hamill 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Blanton, Jr. —.-.,.., Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Hatfield 

Mr. and Mrs. John F. Bookout, Jr. «■ Mr. and Mrs. Jack W. Hawkins 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul G. Bower •Oi-.A^^.i-... Mr. and Mrs. Alex W. Head 

Mr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Breen Mr. and Mrs. Neal B. Heaps •■/ 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Robins Brice laQ Mr. and Mrs. Bruce I. Hendrickson " 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Burguieres Mr. John Hem 

Mr. and Mrs. John D. Bums . Mr. and Mrs. Irwin C. Herz. Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Butner Mr. and Mrs. Max H. Herzstein 

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Cabaniss Mr. William James Hill 

Mr. and Mrs. Theodore C. Campbell Mr. Fred G. Hollins 

Dr. Robert J. Card and Ms. Karol Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Howard 

Kreymer Mr. and Mrs. John R. Huff 

Mr. and Mrs. Clint Carlson Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. Huff 

Mr. James W. Carroll Mr. and Mrs. George G. Hughes, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael Carroll ... Mr. Vester T. Hughes, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Michael Carter Mr. and Mrs. John A. Irvine 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Cizik Mr. Carl E. Isgren 

Dr. Leon Wilson Clark Mr. and Mrs. John C. Jackson, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bill T. Closs Mr. and Mrs. Allan K. James 

Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Cloudman. Ill Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Jamail 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter R. Coneway Mr. and Mrs. Edwin J. Jennings 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen C. Cook Mr. and Mrs. Raleigh W. Johnson, Jr. 

Dr. and Mrs. Leslie Cookenboo Mr. and Mrs. C. Daniel Jones 

Judge and Mrs. Finis E. Cowan Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Marshall H. Crawford Mr. and Mrs. T. Robert Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Andre Crispin Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence G. Katz 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Crownover Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Keightley 

Mr. Edward J. Davis Mr. and Mrs. Henry H. King 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Davis Dr. Joel Kirkpatrick 

Mr. and Mrs. James H. Degnan Mr. and Mrs. William A. Kistler, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin A. Dow Mrs. Lullene Powell Knox 

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Elder Mr. and Mrs. Neal F. Lane 

Mr. and Mrs. John Williams Elsenhans Mr. and Mrs. Ronald C. Lassiter 



^HAT2ai^A VI0ITA«T2Il^IWaA f^ 



Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Levy 

Mr. Ellie W. Long, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vernon T. Long 

Mr. and Mrs. H. Malcolm Lovett, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Charles Lucky ^ '^^■ 

Dr. and Mrs. Fred R. Lummis, Jr.'^ ■'' 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael R. Lynch '"^ -'-^^ 

Mr. James E. Lyon 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm T. McCants 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. McFarland 

Dr. Larry V. and Dr. Mary Mclntire 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas S. Mcintosh 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. McKittrick 

Mrs. Mary Hale Lovett McLean -t> '"^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Jay R. McLure 

Dr. and Mrs. G. Walter McReynolds 

Mr. and Mrs. Don Mafrige 

Mr. and Mrs. Rodney H. Margolis 

Mr. and Mrs. Leonard N. Martin - - -- 

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Massey ' 

Dr. and Mrs. Edward K. Massin ''" 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles S. Matthews' ^' 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Middleton 

Mr. and Mrs. Peder Monsen ~ - 

Mr. Harvin C. Moore, Jr. '■''■ b»ifi •"s*^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Morris. Jr. '' 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Carloss Morris. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred F. Murray 

Dr. Leigh W. Murray and Dr. David 

Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy Lemuel Nolen III 
Mr. and Mrs. Gwynne E. Old ' ' -^ 
Ms. Dora Belinda Ong -"'i^ iJ^- 

Mr. William P. Pannill ' -^tJ^O .>{ .?:i\/. 
Mr. and Mrs. Phil Peden "' ' ' '^^fi .iCJ 
Mr. and Mrs. Butler Ferryman '■ '''^ 
Dr. and Mrs. Lysle H. Peterson 3 il^ 
Mrs. Geraldine S. Priest 
Dr. and Mrs. Meyer L. Proler 
Mr. James D. Prugh and Ms. Diane E 

Fatheree "^ •'i''' 

Mr. and Mrs. John B. Reeder ^^'^- 

Mr. and Mrs. Norman T. Reynolds 
Mr. Morton L. Rich 
Mr. Edward R. "Ted" Richardson ^ 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Richardson 
Mrs. Evelyn Fink Rosenthal 
Mr. Jeff Ross and Ms. Doris A. 

Williams 
Mr. and Mrs. William D. Ruckelshaus 
Dr. and Mrs. George Rupp 



1/ 



Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius O. Ryan '; ;', 
Mr. and Mrs. Gus A. Schill, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edmund P. Segner r / 

Mr. and Mrs. Dexter Senft .; ^ 

Mrs. Rex Shanks, Jr. ^j^^ ..k^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Stephen J. Shaper.j^^, .,j-/ 

Mr. and Mrs. Jo E. "Jed" Shaw ■',[,,. ^y 
Mr. and Mrs. Ted G. Shown 
Mr. and Mrs. William N. Sick, Jr. 

Mr. C. H. Siebenhausen. Jr. ,; ,, 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard M. Siegler r^- 

Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Simmons j/' 

Ms. Emilie Bendix Slohm ,jyf 

Mr. Robert C. Smythe ^^j. ^^ 



Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Steed 



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Mr. and Mrs. Dan C. Steiner ^ ^^^ji^ 
Mr. R. Bruce Stewart ^j/ 

Dr. and Mrs. Earl J. Stoufflet, Jr. ; a 
Dr. and Mrs. John R. Strawn 
Mr. J. Frank Summers 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Szalkowski 
Mr. and Mrs. Tim B. Tarrillion 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh W. Thompson III 
Mr. Robert and Dr. Rachel Thompson 
Mr. and Mrs. John Z. Tomich 
Mr. James Gary Treybig ,j^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm M. Turner ,f/ 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe H. Tydlaska -f /, 

Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Wainerdi 
Mr. and Mrs. James V. Walzel 
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick A. Weber 
Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence E. Westkaemper 
Mr. and Mrs. James A. Whitson, Jr. ,^ 
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Williamson ,,„,, '■>•./ 
Mr. and Mrs. Hugh T. Wilson yf ^.^y^ 
Mr. and Mrs. L. Dale Wooddy ,p^ ,].,- 
Mr. and Mrs. James Woodruff ^f/ .,^,/ 
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Wylie ,.,g 

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10 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

LIFE MEMBERS 

Mr. and Mrs. K. S. Adams, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanford J. Alexander 

Mr. and Mrs. Joe Allbritton 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin M. Anderson 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Leland Anderson 

Mrs. Wiley N. Anderson, Jr. 

Mrs. Forrest L. Andrews 

Mr. and Mrs. Roman F. Amoldy 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry G. Austin 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Avery 

Mr. and Mrs. Lovett Baker 

Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Ballard 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul F. Bamhart 

Mrs. Alec C. Bayless. Jr. ^f ^^ 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Bellows 

Mr. and Mrs. Warren S. Bellows, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Blocker -^^ 

Mrs. James C. Boone 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Bravenec 

Mrs. James L. Britton 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart Brown -iM one .iM 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Brown 

Mr. and Mrs. William D. Broyles 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Burrow 

Mrs. Charles L. Bybee "^ '^^ 

Mrs. John C. Bybee 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon A. Cain 

Mr. and Mrs. Durell Carothers ""' ■ "" 

Mr. and Mrs. Allen H. Carruth 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry J. Chavanne 

Miss Mary E. Chavanne 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold D. Clark ••'^ '^^ 

Mrs. R. Sperry Clarke '^^ •''^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Clarke ^"« ""^ 

Mr. Michael Cooper and Ms. Sandra L. 

Brunow 
Mr. and Mrs. Theodore W. Cooper 
Mrs. John W. Cox 
Mr. and Mrs. Joe Fred Crabb 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Crooker, Jr. 
Mrs. Milton C. Cross 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Cruikshank 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Dalton, Jr. 
Mrs. William E. Daniels 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Decker 
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Delaney 
Mr. and Mrs. David Devine 
Mr. and Mrs. William M. Dickey 
Mrs. Robert P. Doherty, Jr. 



Mr. and Mrs. John L. Dore 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Topping Douglas 

Mr. and Mrs. Sam P. Douglass 

Mr. and Mrs. Walker J. Duffie 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Duncan 

Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Espinoza 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomas Eubank 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Farren 

Mrs. Johanna A. Favrot 

Mrs. Herbert E. Fisher 

Mrs. James A. Fite. Jr. 

Mrs. Ruth Grafton Fitzgerald 

Mrs. Charles I. Francis 

Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Franzheim II 

Mrs. Herbert Frensley 

Mr. Peter M. Frost 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Ganchan 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Garrett 

Mr. and Mrs. Ranald M. "Don" 

Garrison 
Mr. and Mrs. Larry D. George 
Mr. E. Ted Georges 
Mr. Billy F. Gibbons 
Mr. and Mrs. T. Franklin Glass, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred C. Glassell, Jr. iM 
Mr. Wayne K. Goettsche .iM 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Gonzalez .iM 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry B. Gordon iM 
Mr. and Mrs. Saunders Gregg iQ 

Mr. and Mrs. Jenard M. Gross 
Dr. and Mrs. Norman Hackerman -'' >"• 
Mrs. Charles W. Hamilton 
Mr. and Mrs. O. Ben Hander 
Mrs. R. Clyde Hargrove 
Dr. and Mrs. Charles B. Headrick 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Heard 
Mr. Erwin Heinen 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hershey 
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald D. Hines 
Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Hollingsworth, Jr. 
Mr. R. B. Hoover 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard W. Home 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Horton 
Mr. and Mrs. David D. Itz 
Mr. and Mrs. R. Graham Jackson 
Mr. and Mrs. John C. Jacobs, Jr. 
Mr. Meredith H. James, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Palmer W. Jenkins 
Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Jensen 
Mrs. Charlotte Collins Johnson 
Mr. and Mrs. Curtis O. Johnson, Jr. 



11 



Mrs. Gaylord Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert K. Johnson 

Mr. and Mrs. Willard M. Johnson 

Mr. J. Maresh Jones 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Josey 

Mr. and Mrs. Michael T. Judd 

Mr. Howard B. Keck 

Mr. and Mrs. William Keenan 

The Honorable and Mrs. Edward W. 

Kelley, Jr. 
Mrs. Edward A. Kelly ,, 

Mr. and Mrs. Baine P. Ken- 
Mr. and Mrs. James L. Ketelsen 
Mrs. George F. Kirby 
Mr. and Mrs. George B. Kitchel 
Mr. and Mrs. H. Fred Kongabel 
Mr. and Mrs. Neal T. Lacey, Jr. 
Mrs. Theodore N. Law 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Griffith Lawhon 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Fred Lawrence 
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Lederer, Jr. 
Mrs. Paul A. Lederer 
Mr. and Mrs. Murphy K. Lents 
Mrs. Louis Letzerich 
Mrs. Max Levine 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Ley 
Ms. Sharon Ley 
Mr. Stephen W. Ley 
Mr. and Mrs. Wendel D. Ley 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Hugh Liedtke 
Mr. and Mrs. William R. Lloyd, Jr. 
Mrs. Mason G. Lockwood 
Mrs. Otto J. Lottman / i-,,,^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Love 
Mr. H. Malcolm Lovett 
Mrs. James M. Lykes, Jr. 
Mr. John F. Lynch ,! 

Mr. and Mrs. S. Maurice McAshan, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jerry McCleskey 
Mrs. R. Thomas McDermott 
Mr. Milton B. McGinty 
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. McLean 
Mrs. C. E. McWilliams 
Mr. and Mrs. William S. Mackey, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John T. Maginnis 
Mrs. Francis H. Maloney 
Mr. Leigh Henry Masterson 
Mrs. John Mecom. Sr. 
Judge and Mrs. James R. Meyers ; .,vj 
Mr. Frank W. Michaux if/ 



if/' 



iQ 
.-iM 



■i/ 



->!/ 



.11/. 
.iM 



Mr. and Mrs. William James Miller 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Millington 

Mr. Earl Douglas Mitchell ,^ ,,•/ 

Mr. Dan M. Moody ' j/ 

Mr. and Mrs. Harvin C. Moore, Sr. 

Mrs. Stanley C. Moore 

Mr. L A. Naman : ^.jy 1,^ ,^ .- 

Mrs. Leon M. Nad 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin P. Neilan , 

Mr. and Mrs. Millard K. Neptune /• 

Mrs. Hugo V. Neuhaus, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Philip Ross Neuhaus 

Mrs. W. Oscar Neuhaus 

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Noble II 

Mr. and Mrs. George R. O'Connor 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. O'Connor . ,f^ 

Mrs. Maconda Brown O'Connor 

Mr. Gustav M. O'Keiff 

Mrs. Edythe Bates Old and Mr. Herbert 

D. Brown 
Mr. and Mrs. M. Kenneth Oshman 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Ray Pace 
Mrs. Arthur K. Peck ,.; . j^:,^ ,-/_ 

Mrs. Charles A. Perlitz, Jr. (,/ t,f|,^ t/ 
Mrs. George A. Peterkin ^nvi.R :-iJ' 
Mrs. Gwendolyn D. Pingrey " >■/ 

Mr. and Mrs. James D. Pitcock, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Pryor, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. J. Howard Rambin 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Randall III,,^ ,j/. 
Mrs. Eliza Lovett Randall ,,. |/ 

Mr. and Mrs. Risher Randall ^.j. ,j/ 
Mrs. J. Newton Rayzor - 

Mr. and Mrs. Jess Newton Rayzor, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry M. Reasoner 
Mr. and Mrs. T. R. Reckling III 
Mr. Lawrence S. Reed 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Riddell, Jr. \- . , .^ 
Mr. Carl Albert Robertus. Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. David L. Rooke 
Mr. and Mrs. Clive Runnells 
Mrs. Patrick R. Rutherford, Sr 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred G. Sawtelle 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard P. Schissler, Jr. 
Mr. Kenneth Schnitzer 
Dr. and Mrs. H. Irving Schweppe, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Scruggs 
Mr. Alex Segall ^ ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben G. Sewell ' ' V 
Mr. Thomas H. Shartle ^ '^ '!/ 

Mrs. James L. Shepherd, Jr. '^^ '; j 

-Tl. .11/ 






1 2 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 



Mrs. Samuel T. Sikes. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Smith, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gerald H. Smith 

Mrs. Virginia Gibbs Smyth 

Mr. and Mrs. R. John Stanton, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Stude 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis C. Sudler 

Mrs. Robert W. Sumners 

Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Taft Symonds 

Mr. and Mrs. Williston B. Symonds 

Mr. Henry J. N. Taub 

Mr. and Mrs. James U. Teague 

Mr. and Mrs. Howard T. Tellepsen 

Mrs. Russell B. Thorstenberg 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Treadwell 

Mr. Jack T. Trotter 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack A. Turpin 

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Underwood 

Mrs. Milton R. Underwood 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles A. Van Wart 

Mr. and Mrs. Ame Vennema 

Dr. Teresa J. Vietti 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Waters '■^' ' ■•* 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Welsh, Jr:^^ ■^^'^^^•'' 

Mrs. Roger M. Wheeler '"^ ^''^^ 

Mr. I. M. Wilford ' ' '-' 

Mrs. Wallace D. Wilson 

Mrs. Friedarica B. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace S. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. James C. Winters 

Mr. and Mrs. M. A. Wright 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Scott Ziegler 

Mrs. E. K. Zingler 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank E. Zumwalt, Jr. 



CONTRIBUTING LIFE MEMBERS 



Mrs. Josephi 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. Frederic 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 
Mr. and Mrs 



ne E. Abercrombie , 
. Louis K. Adler "rj' 
. Robert H. Allen 
. Arthur D. Alsobrook 
. D. Kent Anderson 
. Gary A. Anderson 
. Robert H. Andrews 
. Kingsland Arnold 
J. Attermeier 
. J. Evans Attwell 
. Stewart A. Baker 
. James H. Beall 
. Sam Rice Bethea 



Col. and Mrs. Raymond C. Bishop 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles M. Blair 

Dr. Robert K. Blair 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack S. Blanton 

Mr. and Mrs. Donald L. Bonham 

Mrs. James P. Boone 

Mr. and Mrs. Edgar O. Bottler 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Russell Bowers 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Bracht 

Dr. amd Mrs. Timothy L. Bratton 

Mr. Joe Brazzatti 

Mr. and Mrs. Clark W. Breeding 

Dr. and Mrs. John H. Brennan 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin E. Brewer. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Isaac S. Brochstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond D. Brochstein 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack B. Buckley 

Mr. and Mrs. William R. Bullen, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Butcher 

Mr. and Mrs. Roy E. Campbell 

Mr. and Mrs. Emory T. Carl 

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory P. Catsinas 

Mr. and Mrs. David F. Chapman 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Chapman 

Dr. and Mrs. Claude C. Cody III 

Mr. and Mrs. James E. Cooper III 

Mr. and Mrs. John L. Cox 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Crosswell, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas H. Cruikshank 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd K. Davis 

Mrs. John de Menil 

Mrs. Katherine B. Dobelman 

Mrs. Elva Kalb Dumas 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles W. Duncan, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Elder, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Elkins. Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Elkins III 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Evershade, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey M. Farb 

Mr. and Mrs. William S. Farish III 

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Finger 

Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Gaylord 

Mr. and Mrs. Basil Georges 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Glanville 

Mr. and Mrs. Wayne E. Glenn 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert B. Goff 

Mr. and Mrs. Aron S. Gordon 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh E. Gragg 

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin H. Greenwood 

Dr. J. John Gugenheim 

Mr. Walter G. Hall 

Mr. and Mrs. David Hannah, Jr. 



'HIMGA 13; 



Mrs. Joyce Pounds Hardy lijiiP 

Mr. and Mrs. James W. Hargrove 

Mr. and Mrs. Ben C. Hayton 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Hermance 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry W. Hoagland 

Mrs. Oveta Culp Hobby 

The Honorable and Mrs. William P. 

Hobby 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Holland ■'HA'''\f' 
Mr. and Mrs. Paul N. Howell 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Hudson T>1b >jji. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Hudspeth 
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Illig 
Mr. and Mrs. Guy W. Jackson, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Jackson 
Mr. and Mrs. James P. Jackson i^.^>rto« 
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Joplin 
Mrs. Edward W. Kelley 
Mr. and Mrs. Lebbeus C. Kemp, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert N. Kidd 
Mr. and Mrs. William F. Kieschnick 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Boyd Kilgore 
Mrs. Alfred J. Knapp 
Mr. and Mrs. Roy L. Lay 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Loewenstem, Jr. 
Dr. John N. Loomis 
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel B. Lovejoy 
Mr. and Mrs. William McCardell 
Mrs. Don E. McMahon 
Mr. and Mrs. Burton J. McMurtry 
Mrs. Whitfield H. Marshall 
Mr. Speros P. Martel 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris Masterson III 
Mr. Robert R. Maxfield 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Meyer III 
Mr. and Mrs. George R. Miner 
Mr. and Mrs. George P. Mitchell 
Mr. and Mrs. Pat H. Moore 
Mrs. Thomas W. Moore 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter P. Moore, Jr. 
Mrs. William T. Moran 
Mr. and Mrs. S. I. Morris 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Mosbacher 
Mr. and Mrs. Jon L. Mosle, Jr. 
Mr. and Mrs. John G. Mott 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter D. Murphy 
Mr. and Mrs. James K. Nance 
Mrs. Wheeler Nazro 
Mrs. Edward Norbeck 
Mr. Ralph S. O'Connor 
Mr. Henry Oliver 
Mr. and Mrs. Haylett O'Neill, Jr. 



-J? 



Mr. Edward Oppenheimer , 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Oprea, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Pate 

Mr. and Mrs. W. Bernard Pieper 

Mr. and Mrs. George F. Pierce, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. James L. Powell 

Mr. William J. Rapson, Jr. > 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Claxton Rayzor 

Mr. and Mrs. John Gregory Reilly 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph F. Reilly, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hershel M. Rich 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Rogers III 

Mr. and Mrs. Nat S. Rogers / 

Mrs. Charlotte A. Rothwell 

Mr. and Mrs. William C. Rousseau 

Dr. Max F. Roy A ,3ir'i 

Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Rudy 

Mr. and Mrs. David M. Rulfs, Sr. _ j 

Miss Jane L. Rulfs 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank B. Ryan 

Sylvia and Seymour Sacks , , ,, 

Mr. Fayez Sarofim 

Mrs. Louisa Stude Sarofim 

Mr. and Mrs. Patric Savage 

Mrs. Eddy C. Scurlock 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank C. Shelden 

Mr. and Mrs. William Shiffick 

Mr. Harry K. Smith 

Mr. Lloyd Hilton Smith ^ / 

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Smith ^^^^^^^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis D. Spaw, Jr.' p. 

Mr. and Mrs. Seldon Steed ; 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert L. Stone _^., 

Mrs. W. Mclver Streetman 

Mr. Selby Sullivan 

Mrs. H. Gardiner Symonds " 

Mr. and Mrs. Karl C. ten Brink '«fiC'3 

Mr. Warren T. Thagard III ^ 

Mr. James T. Wagoner 

Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph F. Weichert, Jr. 

Dr. Damon Wells, Jr. 

Mrs. Wesley West ^ > 

Mr. and Mrs. R. Howard Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard O. Wilson 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel A. Winkelmann 

Mr. James O. Winston, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. David R. Wintermann 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis G. Winters 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin N. Woodson 

Mrs. Sam P. Worden , 

Dr. and Mrs. Charles W. Yates, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Glenn Yeager 



14 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Instructional and Research Staff 



J, Emeritus Faculty 

Andrews, John F., 1 982-9 1 . Professor Emeritus of Environmental Science and Engineer- 
ing 

B.S.C.E. (1951). M.S. (1954) University of Arkansas; Ph.D. (1964) University of 

California. Berkeley 
Austin, Walter J., 1960-87. Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E. (1941) Rice Institute: M.S. (1946), Ph.D. (1949) University of Illinois 
Awapara, Jorge, 1957-84. Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry 

B.S. (1941), M.S. (1942) Michigan State University; Ph.D. (1947) University of Southern 

California 
Bale, Allen M., 1947-78. Athletic Director Emeritus 

B.S. (1930) Rice Institute; M.A. (1939) Columbia University 
Barker, J.R., 1949-86. Professor Emerims of Health and Physical Education 

B.S. (1949) Rice Institute; M.Ed. (1954) University of Texas '."^ 

Beckmann, Herbert W,K., 1957-85. Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering" . ' 

Cand. Ing. (1939), Dipl. Ing. (1944), Dr. Ing. (1957), Hanover University, Germany 
Bland, Robert L., 1954-1992. Professor Emeritus of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences 

Central Washington State College; M.A. (1954) Columbia University 
Bourgeois, Andre Marie Georges, 1928-72. Favrot Professor of French 

Bachelier en lettres (1921), Bachelier en Droit (1923), Certifie d'etudes superieuries de 

lettres (1930) University of Paris, France; M.A. (1934) University of Texas; Docteurde 

riuniversite (1945) University of Paris, France; Commandeur de I'Ordre des Palmes 

Academiques ( 1 97 1 ) 
Brotzen, Franz Richard, 1954-86. Stanley C. Moore Professor Emeritus of Materials 

Science 

B.S. (1950). M.S. (1953), Ph.D. (1954) Case Institute of Technology 
Brown, Katherine Tsanoff, 1963-89. Professor Emeritus of Art History and Honorary 

Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1938) Rice Institute; M.F.A. (1940) Cornell University 
Bryan, Andrew Bonnell, 1957-68. Lecturer Emeritus in Physics ^ .. 

B.A. (1918), M.A. (1920), Ph.D. (1922) Rice Institute .iM 

Camden, Carroll, 1930-73. Professor Emeritus of English and Honorary Charter Associ- ' 

ate of Hanszen College 

A.B. (1925) Centre College; Ph.D. (1930) University of Iowa 
Cason, Carolyn, 1956-74. Lecturer Emeritus in Dietetics 

B.S. (1934) University of Texas; M.A. (1939) Columbia University 
Chamberlain, Joseph W., 1971-1990. Professor Emeritus of Space Physics and As- 
tronomy 
.. A.B. (1948) A.M. (1949) University of Missouri; M.S. (1951). Ph.D. (1952) University 
» of Michigan 
Clark, Howard Charles, 1966-88. Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1959) University of Oklahoma; M.A. (1965). Ph.D. (Stanford University) 
Class, Calvin M., 1952-85. Professor Emeritus of Physics 

A.B. (1943), Ph.D. (1951) Johns Hopkins University 



'• ■• ^-15 

Dowden, Wilfred Sellers, 1948-87. Professor Emeritus of English and Honorary Associ- 
ate of Baker College 

B.A. (1939), M.A. (1940) Vanderbilt University; Ph.D. (1949) University of North 

Carolina 
Evans, Elinor Lucile, 1964-85. Albert K. and Harry W. Smith Professor Emeritus of 

Architecture 

B.A. (1938) Oklahoma State University; M.F.A. (1954) Yale University -i^.; /. 
Fliegel, Raphael. 1975-89. Professor Emeritus of Violin. 
Fulton, James Street, 1946-74. Professor Emerims of Philosophy and Honorary Master 

ofWiURiceCoUege 

B.A. (1925), M.A. (1929) Vanderbih University; Ph.D. (1934) Cornell University 
Gordon, William E., 1955-85, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Space Physics and 

Astronomy and of Electrical and Computer Engineering 
\\ B.A. (1939), M.A. (1942) Montclair State College; M.S. (1946), Ph.D. (1953) Cornell 

University 
Hackerman, Norman, 1970-85, President Emeritus and Distinguished Professor Emeri- 
tus of Chemistry 
.'" A.B. (1932), Ph.D. (1935) Johns Hopkins University ; .-i . - , x;- .ariM- 
Hake, Evelyn, 1932-74, Lecturer Emeritus in Biology , ., , : iM jiC.3 I, 

B.A. (1930), M.A. (1932) Rice Institute ■ ■ -' 

Hale, Elton B., 1963-79. Professor Emeritus of Accounting 

B.S. (1937), M.A. (1940) Southwest Texas State Teachers College; Ph.D. (1948) Univer- 
sity of Texas 
Hartsook, Arthur J., 1921-61. Professor Emerims of Chemical Engineering 

A.B. (1911) Nebraska Weslayan University; B.S.Ch.E. (1920), M.S. (1921) Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology 
Higginbotham, Sanford Wilson, 1961-83. Professor Emeritus of History 

B.A. (1934) Rice Institute; M.A. (1941) Louisiana State University; Ph.D. (1949) 

University of Pennsylvania 
Hodges, Lee, 1930-71. Professor Emeritus of French . , ■ ^^j ^ a 

B.S. (1930) Harvard University; M.A. (1934) Rice Institute , '^.V ^io'-a^ 

Huddle, Donald L., 1964-1992. Professor Emerims of Economics , „, 

B.S. (1959), M.A. (1960) University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D. (1964) Vanderbilt 

University 
Jitcoff, Andrew N., 1950-72. Professor Emerims of Russian 

Bachelor (1928), Master (1931) Prague Institute of Technology, Czechoslavia 
Kilpatrick, John E., 1947-85. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and of Mathematical 

Sciences 

B.A. (1940) Stephen F. Austin State University; A.M. (1942) University of Kansas; Ph.D. 

(1945) University of Califomia, Berkeley 
Krzyzaniak, Marian, 1964-81. Professor Emerims of Economics .- 

B.A. (1932) University of Poznan, Poland; M.A. (1954) University of Alberta, Canada; 

Ph.D. (1959) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Lecuyer, Maurice Antoine, 1962-79. Professor of French 

Baccalaureat es lettres (1937), Licence es lettres (1943), Diplome d'etudes superieures 

(1944) Universite de Paris, France; Ph.D. (1954) Yale University 
Lewis, Edward S., 1948-90. Professor Emerims of Chemistry 

B.S. (1940) University of Califomia, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1947) Harvard University 
Leeds, J. Venn, Jr., 1 964- 1 989. Professor Emerims of Electrical and Computer Engineer- 



16 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

ing ' -'J 

B.A. (1955), B.S.E.E. (1956) Rice Institute, M.S.E.E. (1960), Ph.D. (1963) University of 

Pittsburgh, J.D. (1972) University of Houston 
Lewis, Edward S., 1948-1990. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

B.S. (1940) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1947) Harvard University 
Manschreck, Clyde L., 1983-86. Harry and Hazel Chavanne Professor Emeritus of 

Religious Studies 

B.A. (1941) George Washington University; B.D. (1944) Garrett Evangelical Seminary; 

M.A. (1944) Northwestern University; Ph.D. (1948) Yale University 
Morehead, James Caddell, Jrs. 1940-79. Professor Emeritus of Architecture and 

Honorary Associate of Baker College 

A.B. (1935) Princeton University; B.Arch. ( 1939) Carnegie Institute of Technology 
Nettleton, Lewis L., 1971-76. Lecturer Emeritus in Geology 

B.S. (1918) University of Idaho; M.S. (1921), Ph.D. (1923) University of Wisconsin 
Nielsen, Niels C, Jr., 1 95 1 -9 1 . Professor Emeritus of Philosophy and Religious Thought 

and Honorary Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1942) George Pepperdine University; B.D. (1946), Ph.D. (1951) Yale University 
Norris, Mary, 1975-88. Professor of Music 

Artists Diploma in Piano ( 1939) Curtis Institute of Music 
Oliver, Covey., 1979-81. Radoslav A. Tsanoff Professor Emeritus of Public Affairs 

B.A. (1933), J.D. (1936) University of Texas; LL.M. (1953), S.J.D. (1954) Columbia 
University; LL.D. (1976) Southern Methodist University 
Oliver-Smith, Philip, 1969-82. Professor Emeritus of Art History 

B.A. (1937), M.A. ( 1950) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1969) New York 

University 
Parsons, David G., 1953-81. Professor Emeritus of AjI and Honorary Associate of Will 

Rice College 

B.S. (1934), M.S. (1937) University of Wisconsin 
Phillips, Gerald C, 1949-88. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (1944), M.A. (1947). Ph.D. (1949) Rice Institute 
Raaphorst, Madeleine Rousseau, 1963-89. Professor of French 

Baccalaureat es lettres (1939) Universite de Poitiers, France; Licence en droit (1943) 
Universite de Paris, France; Ph.D. (1959) Rice Institute 
Rachford, Henry H., Jr., 1964-82. Professor Emeritus of Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. (1945), M.A. ( 1 947) Rice Institute; Sc.D. (1950) MassachuseUs Institute of Technol- 
ogy 

Ransom, Harry Steelsmith, Jr., 1 954-8 1 . Professor Emeritus of Architecture 

B.Arch. ( 1947 Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.Arch. ( 1967) Texas A&M University 

Rath, R. John, 1963-80. Professor Emeritus of History 

A.B. (1932) Kansas; M.A. ( 1934) Berkeley; Ph.D. (1941) Columbia University 

Risser, J.R., 1946-81. Professor Emeritus of Physics 

A.B. (1931) Franklin and Marshall College; M.A. (1935), Ph.D. (1938) Princeton 
University 

Rossini, Frederick D., 1971-75. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry 

B.S. (1925), M.S. (1926) Carnegie Institute; Ph.D. (1928) University of California, 
Berkeley 
Sims, James R., 1942-87. Herman and George R. Brown Professor Emeritus of Civil 
Engineering 
B.S. (1941) Rice Institute; M.S. (1950), Ph.D. (1956) University of Illinois 



Spears, Monroe Kirk, 1964-86. Libbie Sheam Moody Professor Emeritus of English 

A.B., A.M. (1937) University of South Carolina; Ph.D. (1940) Princeton University ,. 
Thomas, Joe David, 1930-77. Professor Emeritus of English 

Ph. B. (1929), A.M. (1930) University of Chicago ■ j 

Thrall, Robert, 1 969-84. Noah Harding Professor Emeritus of Mathematical Sciences and 

Professor Emeritus of Administrative Science 
Tipton, Albert N., 1975-87. Professor Emeritus of Music 

Artists Diploma (1939) Curtis Institute; B.M. (1952) Washington University; M.M. 

(1953) St. Louis Institute of Music 
Todd, Anderson, 1949-1992. G.S. Wortham Professor Emeritus of Architecture 

B.A. (1943), M.F.A. ( 1949) Princeton University .!>«:• A 

Topazio, Virgil William, 1965-83. Laurence H. Favrot Professor of French a 

B.A. (1943) Weslayan College; M. A. (1947), Ph.D. (1951) Columbia University .;rj,j|/ 
Valdivieso, Mercedes, 1973-89. Professor Emeritus of Spanish \ -y> /-. 

Bachillerato(1946) University of Chile; M.A. (1969) University of Houston ?! •"■ 
Wadsworth, Philip A., 1964-73. Professor Emeritus of French li W .<!aa/ 

A.B.(1935), Ph.D. (1939) Yale University . i c-l 

Wall, Frederick T., 1972-79. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry " ' '•''•* ""' ' 

B.C. (1933). Ph.D. (1937) University of Minnesota 
Walker, James B., 1964-1992. Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1943) Rice Institute; M.A. (1949), Ph.D. (1952) University of Texas 
Wilhoit, James Cammack, Jr., 1 954-8 1 . Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering 

and Mathematical Sciences 
-- B.S.M.E. (1948) Rice Institute; M.S. (1951) Texas A&M University; Ph.D. (1954) 

Stanford University 
Williams, George Guion, 1924-68. Professor Emeritus of English ' ^, -vr > 

B.A. (1923), M.A. (1925) Rice Institute 
Young, Richard D., 1965-1992. Professor Emeritus of Economics and Mathematical 

Sciences 

B.A. (1951), M.A. (1954) University of Minnesota; Ph.D. (1965) Carnegie Institute of 

Technology ^^^^ ; ^^ _^^,,,,^ ^ j, ^ 

' vl? hmi "I'-r <<!'S/' i'-:nrl'i'n*? Ill T; . ■'■ i/?. 



'',<vy'U ;■'■>. 









rijiTiiS 



18 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Faculty 

Aazhang, Behnaam, 1985. Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 
and Associate of Lovett College 

B.S. (1981), M.S. (1983), Ph.D. (1986) University of Illinois ' -^ ^- ■ 
Abbatangelo, Rocco, 1991. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.A. (1977) Dickinson College; J.D. (1980) Western New England College 
Abraham, Abraham, 1989. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science and Associate 
of Weiss College 

B.E. (1975) Indian Institute of Technology; M.A. (1985), M.B.A. (1985), Ph.D. (1989) 
Boston University 
Adams, David, 1988. Faculty Fellow in Physics 

B.S. (1980) California Institute o fTechnology; M.S. (1981), Ph.D. (1986) UCLA 
Ahmad, Salahuddin, 1990. Faculty Fellow in Physics 

B.Sc. (1974), M.Sc.( 1975) University of Dhaka, Bangladesh; Ph.D. (1981 ) University of 
Victoria, B.C. Canada 
Akers, William Walter, 1947. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering 
B.S. (1943) Texas Technological College; M.S. (1944) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1950) 
University of Michigan 
Akin, John Edward, 1983. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Mathematical 
Sciences 

B.S. (1964) Tennessee Polytechnic Institute; M.S. (1966) Tennessee Technological 
University; Ph.D. (1968) Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
Alcover, Madeleine, 1975. Professor of French 

Licence de lettres modemes ( 1 962), Diplome d'etudes superieures (1963), Doctorat de 3e 
cycle (1965) France 
Alford, John R., 1985. Associate Professor of Political Sciences and Associate of Hanszen 
College 

B.S. (1975), M.A. (1977) Univ. of Houston; M.A. (1980), Ph.D. (1981) University of 
Iowa 
Alfrey, Clarence P., Jr., 1968. Adjunct Professor in the Biomedical Engineering Labora- 
tory 

B.A. (1951) Rice Institute; M.D. (1955) Baylor College of Medicine; Ph.D. (1966) 
University of Minnesota 
Ambler, John S., 1964. Professor of Political Science and Associate of Brown College 
B.A. (1953) Willamette University; M.A. (1954) Stanford University; Certificat d'etudes 
politiques (1955) University of Bordeaux, France; Ph.D. (1966) University of California, 
Berkeley 
Anderson, James, 1992. G.C. Evans histructor of Mathematics 
:_ B.A. (1986) University of Georgia; Ph.D. (1991) State University of New York, Stony 

Brook 
Anderson, John B., 1975. Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1968) University of South Alabama; M.S. (1970) University of New Mexico; Ph.D. 
(1972) Florida State University 
Angel, Yves C, 1984. Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate of 
Brown College 

B.S. (1976) Ecole Centrale De Lyon, France; M.S. (1977). Ph.D. (1980) University of 
California. Berkeley 
Antoulas, Athanasios C, 1985. Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engi- 
neering 

Dip. in Electrical Engineering (1975), Dip. in Mathematics (1975) Ph.D. (1980) ETH 
Zurich 



'43 AT? niAh u^niTA ^TPT/ffVClA 1® 

Apple, Max I., 1972. Gladys Lx)uise Fox Professor of English * Jr.,. n 

Yli B.A. (1963) University of Michigan; M.A. (1965) Stanford University; Ph.D. (1970) 
University of Michigan 

Arbiter, Eric A., 1977. Assistant Professor of Music 

B.M.E. (1972) Oberlin Conservatory of Music; M.Mus. (1973) Cleveland Institute of 
Music 

Aresu, Bernard, 1977. Associate Professor of French Studies 

Licence es lettres (1967) Universite de Montpellier, France; Ph.D. (1975) University of 
Washington 

Armeniades, Constantine D., 1969. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineer- 
ing and Associate of Will Rice College 

B.S. (1961) Northeastern University; M.S. (1967) Case Institute of Technology; Ph.D. 

(1969) Case Western Reserve University ' ,', 

Atherholt, Robert, 1984. Artist Teacher, Oboe '^ ^^ 

B.Mus. (1976). M.Mus. (1977) Juilliard School of Music •^'^''-''"•^■'"^^■^-J'';;^^ 
Atherton, W. Clifford, Jr., 1988. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.A. ( 1971 ) Rice University; M.B.A. (1977), Ph.D. (1983) University of Texas at Austin 
Atkinson, E. Neely, 1985. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A. (1975). M.A. , Ph.D. (1981) Rice University 
Attwell, Khleber, 1989. Adjunct Professor of Accounting " .'. .11"''^ ., To '" 

B.A. (1953) Rice University; M.P.H. (1982) University of Texas Health Science Center 

at Houston 
Austin, Joe Dan, 1978. Associate Professor of Education and Statistics and Associate of 

Jones College 

B.S. in Applied Mathematics ( 1 966) Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S. in Mathemati- 
cal Statistics (1968). Ph.D. in Mathematics Education (1972) Purdue University 
Ave Lallemant, Hans G., 1970. Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.Sc. (1960), M.Sc. (1964). Ph.D. (1967) Leiden University, Netherlands 
Babikian, Virginia, 1982. Professor of Voice 

B.Mus. (1951). M.Mus. (1952) Westminster Choir College; Artist's Diploma (1957). 

Teatro Lirico Sperimentale Di Spoleto, Italy 
Bailar, Benjamin F., 1 987. Dean of Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration. H. 

Joe Nelson. Ill Professor of Administration, and Associate of Sid Richardson College 

B.A. ( 1955) University of Colorado; M.B.A. (1959) Harvard Graduate School of Business 

Administration 
Bailey, Walter B, 1982. Associate Professor of Music ""' j. . ; '/ 

B.Mus. (1976) Lewis and Clark College; M.A. (1979), Ph.D. (1982) University of 

Southern California 
Baker, Donald Roy, 1 966. Professor of Geology and Geophysics and Honorary Associate 

of Brown College 

B.S. (1950) California Institute of Technology: Ph.D. (1955) Princeton University 
Baker, John W., 1 988. Adjunct Lecturer on Linguistics and Semiotics „ 

B.A. (1967) University of Texas at Austin; M.A. (1975) Johns Hopkins University 
Baker, Lovett, 1986. Lecturer on Administrative Science ^-a 

A.B. (1952) Princeton University ., 7 

Baker, Stephen D., 1963. Professor of Physics and Honorary Associate of Hanszen College 

B.S. (1957) Duke University; M.S. (1959), Ph.D. (1963) Yale University 
Bally, Albert W., 1981 . Harry Carothers Wiess Professor of Geology 

Ph.D. (1953) University of Zurich, Switzerland ^ ,ou,:l ; .^.L 



20 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Banks, Stephen J., 1991 . Adjunct Professor of Administrative Science ' — ** "'■ * 

B.S. (1962) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.B.A. (1967) Harvard University 
Baraniuk, Richard G., 1 992. Assistant Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S. ( 1987) University of Manitoba; M.S. (1988) University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. (1992) 

University of Illinois 
Barnea, Amir, 1989. Professor of Administrative Science 

B.A. (1964), M.Soc.Sc. (1967) Hebrew University; Ph.D. (1972) Cornell University 
Barrera, Enrique V., 1 990. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials 

Science 

B.S. (1979), M.S. (1985), Ph.D. (1987) University of Texas 
Barry, David, 1987. Lecturer on German 

B.A. (1977) Pembroke College; M. A. (1978), Ph.D. (1983) Queen's University, Canada 
Batsell, Richard R., 1980. Jesse H. Jones Distinguished Associate Professor of Adminis- 
trative Science, Associate Professor of Psychology, and Associate of Hanszen 

College 

B.A.. B.B.A. (1971), Ph.D. (1976) University of Texas 
Bavinger, Bill Allen, 1977. Assistant Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (1973), M. Arch. (1976) Rice University 
Bayazitoglu, Yildiz, 1977. Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate of Will 

Rice College 

B.S. (1967) Middle East Technological University; M.S. (1969), Ph.D. (1974) University 

of Michigan 
Bearden, Frank W., 1954. Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. (1947) Texas Technological College; M.A. (1949), Ed.D. (1954) Columbia Univer- 
sity 
Beckingham, Kathleen, 1980. Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.A. (1967), Ph.D. (1972) Cambridge University, England 
Bedient, Philip B., 1975. Shell Distinguished Professor of Environmental Science and 

Engineering 

B.S. (1969), M.S. (1972), Ph.D. (1975) University of Florida 
Benjamin, Don C, Jr., 1978. Lecturer in Religious Studies and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

B.A. (1964) St. Bonaventure University; M.A. (1968) Catholic University of America; 

Ph.D. (1981) Claremont Graduate School 
Bennett, George N., 1978. Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Associate of 

Lovett College 

B.S. (1968) University of Nebraska; Ph.D. (1974) Purdue University 
Bennett, John K., 1988. Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and 

Associate of Wiess College 

B.S.E.E. (1973), M.E.E. (1974) Rice University; M.S. (1983), Ph.D. (1987) University of 
Washington 

Bergen, Barry H., 1990. Mellon Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. (1978) University of Rochester; M.A., Ph.D. (1987) University of Pennsylvania 

Billups, W. Edward, 1970. Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1961), M.S. (1965) Marshall University; Ph.D. (1970) Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity 

Bixby, Robert E., 1984. Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics, Admin- 
istrative Science, and Associate of Baker College 
B.S. (1968) University of California; M.S. (1971), Ph.D. (1972) Cornell University 



qqAT?ni/(A i/Oi> Aflli'lMlM- 



21 



Blackburn, James B., 1975. Lecturer on Architecture and Environmental Science 

B.A. (1969). J.D. (1972) University of Texas; M.S. (1974) Rice University 
Boles, John B., 1981 . Allyn and Gladys Cline Professor of History and Associate of Will 

Rice College 

B.A. (1965) Rice University; Ph.D. (1969) University of Virginia 
Bonner, Billy E., 1985. Professor of Physics and Director, T. W. Bonner Nuclear Lab 

B.S. (1961) Louisiana Polytechnic Institute; M.A. (1963), Ph.D. (1965) Rice University 
Bordelon, Cassius B., Jr., 1972. Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. ( 1964) Louisiana State University; Ph.D. (1972) Baylor College of Medicine 
Boshernitzan, Michael, 1982. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. ( 1 97 1 ) Moscow University, U.S.S.R.; M.A. (1974) Hebrew University, Israel; Ph.D. 

(1981) Weizmann Institute of Science. Israel 

Boterf, Chester Arthur, 1973. Associate Professor of Art 

B.A. (1959) Kansas University; M.F.A. (1965) Columbia University 

Bourland, Hardy. M., 1 96 1 . Lecturer in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Associate 
Dean of Engineering, Director of Rice Engineering Design and Development Institute, 
and Associate of Wiess College 

B.S. (1955) Texas Technological College; S.M.E.E. (1957) Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology - - -- 

Braam, Janet, 1990. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1980) Southern Illinois University; Ph.D. (1985) Sloan-Kettering Division of 

Cornell Graduate School of Medical Sciences 
Brelsford, John W., Jr., 1970. Professor of Psychology and Statistics and Master ofBrown 

College 

B.A. (1960). M.A. (1961) Texas Christian University; Ph.D. (1965) University of Texas 
Bridges, Eileen, 1987. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

B.S. (1977) California Institute of Technology; M.E.E. (1978) Rice University; M.B.A. 

(1982) University of Santa Clara; Ph.D. (1987) Northwestern University 

Brito, Dagobert L., 1984. George A. Peterkin Professor of Political Economy and 

Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. (1967). M.A. (1970), Ph.D. (1970) Rice University '.jn5;>i 

Brody, Baruch, 1975. Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. (1962) Brooklyn College; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (1967) Princeton University ' -^ 
Broker, Karin L., 1980. Associate Professor of Art and Associate of Lovett College 

B.F.A. (1972) University of Iowa; M.F.A. (1980) University of Wisconsin 
Brooks, Philip R., 1964. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Lovett College 

B.S. (1960) California Institute of Technology; Ph.D. (1964) University of California, 

Berkeley 
Brooks, Wayne, 1985. Artist Teacher, Viola • .^^pfig' » 

Diploma ( 1 977) Curtis Institute of Music 
Brown, Barry W., 1970. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.S. (1959) University of Chicago; M.S. (1961), Ph.D. (1963) University of California, 
Berkeley 
Brown, Bryan W., 1 983. Professor of Economics and Statistics and Associate of Will Rice 
College 

B. A. ( 1 969), M. A. ( 1 972) Texas Tech University; Ph.D. ( 1 977) University of Pennsylva- 
nia 
Brown, Richard, 1984. Associate Professor of Percussion 

B.M.E. (1969) Temple University; M.Mus. (1971) Catholic University of America 



22 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

' Bryan, William J., 1982. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.A. (1971) Johns Hopkins University; M.D. (1975) Baylor College of Medicine 
Bryant, John B., 198 1 . Henry S. Fox Sr. Professor of Economics, Professor of Adminis- 
trative Science and Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. (1969) Oberlin College; M.S. (1973), Ph.D. (1975) Carnegie-Mellon University 
Buffler, Richard T., 1984. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1959) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1967) University of California, Berkeley 
Burke, Kevin, C. A., 1983. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics ,. .,_,,. .,,. 

B.Sc.(1951), Ph.D. (1953) University of London, England ,2,8 

Burnett, Sarah A., 1972. Associate Professor of Psychology, Dean of Students, and 
« Associate of Jones College 

B.S. (1966) Memphis State University; M.S. (1970), Ph.D. (1972) Tulane University 
Burnside, Mary A., 1986. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (1972) Rice University; M.A. (1976). Ph.D. (1980) University of Houston 
Burrus, C. Sidney, 1965. Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Honorary 

Associate of Will Rice College and Associate of Lovett College 
' B.A., B.S.E.E. (1958) Rice Institute; M.S. (1960) Rice University; Ph.D. (1965) Stanford 

University 
Burt, George, 1985. Associate Professor of Theory and Composition 

B. A. ( 1 955 ) University of California, Berkeley; M. A. ( 1 958) Mills College M.F.A. (1962) 

Princeton University 
Busby III, George W., 1989. Lecturer on Chemistry 
1 B.S. (1968) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A. (1970), Ph.D. (1975) Harvard 

University 
Butler, James E., 1982. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. (1956) University of the South; M.A. (1957) Southwest Texas State College; M.D. 
(1962) University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston 
: Caflisch, Anna B., 1983. Lecturer on Italian 

Liceo Classico J. Stellini, Udine, Italy; Dottore in Lettere (1958) Universita del Sacro 

Cuore, Milan, Italy 
J Callahan, Daniel L., 1 990. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials 

Science 

B.S. (1985) Rice University; M.S. (1987), Ph.D. (1989) University of California, Berke- 
ley 
1 Camfield, William A., 1969. Joseph and Joanna Nazro Mullen Professor of Art History 

and Associate of Jones College 

A.B. (1957) Princeton University; M.A. (1961), Ph.D. (1964) Yale University 
; Campbell, James Wayne, 1959. Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1953) Southwest Missouri State University; M.S. (1955) University of Illinois; 

Ph.D. (1958) University of Oklahoma 
Cannady, William Tillman, 1 964. Professor of Architecture 
I B.Arch. (1961) University of California, Berkeley; M.Arch. (1962) Harvard University 

Cardus, David, 1970. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

p B.A., B.Sc. (1942) University of Montpellier, France; M.D. (1949) Barcelona Medical 

School, Spain 
Carnahan, Norman F., 1 986. Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 
i B.SChE (1965) University of Houston; Ph.D. (1971) University of Oklahoma. 

ftnif^it' , '■ ■ ,■ I I A 1-1 / 1 111 , II 11 (I M • . ' - 1 J ^<. 1 : ;v. . r ii . I .. ' ..T . . . K. ' ^ . I -. . < -/..Q 



23 

Carrington, Samuel M., Jr., 1967. Professor of French, and Associate of Jones College. 

A.B. (1960), M.A. (1962), Ph.D. (1965) University of North Carolina 
Carroll, James W., 1992. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Accounting „ ,-, 

B.A. (1977), M.A. (1977) Rice University 
Carroll, Michael M., 1988. Burton J. and Ann M. McMurtry Professor of Engineering and 

Dean of the George R. Brown School of Engineering 

B.A. (1958), M.A. (1959) University College Galway; Ph.D. (1964) Brown University 
Cartwright, Robert S., Jr., 1980. Professor of Computer Science and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.A. (1971) Harvard College, M.A. (1973), Ph.D. (1973) Stanford University 
Casbarian, John Joseph, 1973. Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (1969) Rice University, M.F.A. (1971) California Institute of the Arts, B.Arch. 

(1972) Rice University 
Castaneda, James A., 1961. Professor of Spanish and Honorary Master of Will Rice 

College and Golf Coach 

B.A. (1954) Drew University; M.A. (1955), Ph.D. (1958) Yale University 
Cavallaro, Joseph R., 1 988. Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

and Associate of Lovett College 

B.S.E.E. ( 1 98 1 ) University of Pennsylvania; M.S.E.E. (1982) Princeton University; Ph.D. 
(1988) Cornell University 

Chae, Suchan, 1985. Assistant FVofessor of Economics ..-o.,, * r,/ - rnTs •> p 

B.S. (1978) Seoul National University; M.S. (1980) Jeonbuk National University; Ph.D. 

(1985) University of Pennsylvania 
Chance, Jane, 1973. Professor of English 

B.A. (1967) Purdue University; M.A. (1968), Ph.D. (1971) University of Illinois 
Chapman, Alan Jesse, 1946. Harry S. Cameron Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E. (1945) Rice Institute; M.S. (1949) University of Colorado; Ph.D. (1953) 

University of Illinois 
Chapman, Walter G., 1990. Assistant Professor in Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (1983) Clemson University; Ph.D. (1988) Cornell University ^'^ ' ^ 

Cheatham, John Bane, Jr., 1963. Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S. (1948), M.S. (1953) Southern Methodist University; Ph.D. (1960) Rice University 
Chen, Lilly C.H., 1981. histructor in Linguistics and Semiotics 

B.A. ( 1961 ) National Taiwan University; M.A. (1969), Ph.D. (1974) University of Illinois 
Choudhary, Madhusudan, 1990. Huxley Instructor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biol- 
ogy ^ 

B.Sc. (1974), M.Sc. (1977) Patna University; Ph.D. (1987) McMaster University > ^^'3 
Ciliske, Kathleen B., 1991. Lecturer on Accounting ■. .^^ . ,> j/ '^0 yy 

B.A. (1979), M.A. (1980) Rice University 
Citron, Marcia J., 1976. Professor of Music and Associate of Brown College 

B.A. (1966) Brooklyn College; M.A. (1970), Ph.D. (1971) University of North Carolina 
Ciufolini, Marco A., 1984. Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1978) Spring Hill College; Ph.D. (1981) University of Michigan 
Clark, John W., Jr., 1968. Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering 

B.S. ( 1962) Christian Brothers College; M.S. (1965), Ph.D. ( 1967) Case Western Reserve 
University 

Clark, Susan L., 1973. Professor of German and Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1969) Mount Union College; M.Phil. (1972), Ph.D. (1973) Rutgers University 



24 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Cloutier, Paul A., 1967. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1964) University of Southwestern Louisiana; Ph.D. (1967) Rice University 
Cochran, Tim D., 1990. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (1977) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A. ( 1 979). Ph.D. (1982) University 

of California, Berkeley 
Cohen, Ruben D., 1 985 . Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Associate of 

Wiess College 

B.M.E. (1978) Concordia University, Montreal; M.S.M.E. (1979) University of Massa- 
chusetts, Amherst; Ph.D. (1985) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Colaco, Joseph P., 1975. Lecturer on Architecture 

B.S. (1960) University of Bombay, India; M.S. (1962). Ph.D. (1965) University of Illinois 
Connelly, Brian, 1984. Artist Teacher, Piano Accompaniment and Vocal Coach 

B.Mus. (1980), M.Mus. (1983) University of Michigan 
Conte, Joel P., 1990. Assistant Professor in Civil Engineering and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

Diploma of Civil Engineering (1985) Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne, 

Switzerland; M.S. (1986), Ph.D. (1990) University of California-Berkeley 
Cooper, Bruce F., 1986. Lecturer on Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.A. (1978) Kent State; Ph.D. (1985) Rice University 
Cooper, Keith D., 1 990. Associate Professor of Computer Science and Associate of Brown 

College ^^j 

B.S. (1978), M.A. ( 1982). Ph.D. ( 1983) Rice Univeristy 
Cooper, Paul, 1974. Lynette S. Autrey Professor in Music and Composer-in-Residence 

B.Mus., B.A. (1950). M.A. (1953), D.M.A. (1956) University of Southern California 
Copeland, James E., 1966. Professor of Linguistics and Semiotics and Associate of Baker 

College , 

B.A. (I961)University of Colorado; Ph.D. (1965) Cornell University 
Corcoran, Marjorie D., 1980. Professor of Physics and Associate of Baker College 

B.S. (1972) University of Dayton; Ph.D. (1977) Indiana University 
Cox, Alan L., 1991. Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

B.S. (1986) Carnegie Mellon; M.S. (1988), Ph.D. (1991) University of Rochester 
Cox, Dennis, 1992. Professor of Statistics 

B.A. (1972) University of Colorado; M.S. (1976) University of Denver; Ph.D. (1980) 

University of Washington. 
Cox, Edward L., 1989. Associate Professor of History and Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. (1970) University of the West Indies; M.A. (1973) and Ph.D. (1977) The Johns 

Hopkins University 
Cox, Steve J., 1988. Assistant Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics 

B.S. ( 1982). M.S. (1983) Marquette University; Ph.D. (1988) Rensselar Polytechnic Inst. 
Cramer, Dwight, 1989. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative Science ^ 

A.B. (1974) Harvard University; J.D. (1978) Columbia University 
Crowell, Steven G., 1983. Associate Professor of Philosophy and Associate j 

of Hanszen College 

A.B. (1974) University of California, Santa Cruz; M.A. ( 1976) Northern Illinois Univer- 
sity; Ph.D. ( 1 98 1 ) Yale University 
Crump, Caryn McQuilkin, 1986. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.S. (1974) Indiana University; M.B.A. (1977) University of Chicago 



XUrta. 



ZraAT9rTi/tA ty^nifTA aT>TLATTjrn 



'ii 



Cunningham, Robert A., 1986. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering and 

Materials Science 

A.A. (1943) Schriner Institute; B.S.M.E. (1949), M.S.M.E. (1955) Rice Institute ■'" 
Cunningham, R. George, 1979. Lecturer on Architecture 

B.S. (1952) University of Texas y^j 

Curl, Robert F., Jr., 1958. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (1954) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1957) University of California, Berkeley 
Cuthbertson, Gilbert Morris, 1963. Professor of Political Science and Resident Associ- 
ate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1959)University of Kansas; Ph.D. (1963) Harvard University 
Cyprus, Joel H., 1 965 . Lecturer in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.A., B.S.E.E. (1959) Rice Institute; M.S. (1961), Ph.D. (1963) Rice University 
Daichman, Graciela S., 1973. Lecturer on Spanish and Associate of Baker College 

Profesorado (1958) Institute Nacional del Profesorado en Lenguas Vivas; M.A. (1975), 

Ph.D.( 1983) Rice University 
Dakoulas, Panajiotis (Panos) Christos, 1987. Assistant Professor in Civil Engineering 

and Associate of Hanszen College 

Dipoloma (1980) National Technical University of Athens, Greece; M.Sc. (1982), Ph.D. 

(1985) Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Davidson, Chandler, 1966. Professor of Sociology 

B.A. (1961) University of Texas; M.A. (1966), Ph.D. (1969) Princeton University ^^^ 
Davis, Philip W., 1969. Professor of Linguistics and Semiotics 

B.A. (1961) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1965) Cornell 
Davis, Sam H., Jr., 1957. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, Professor 

of Mathematical Sciences. Master of Mary Gibbs Jones College 

B.A. (1952), B.S. (1953) Rice Institute; ScD. (1957) Massachusetts Institute of 

Technologv 
Dawson, Clint, 1990. Assistant Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics 

B.A. (1982). M.S. (1984) Texas Tech University; Ph.D. (1988) Rice University 
De Bremaecker, Jean-Claude, 1959. Professor of Geology and Geophysics and Associate 

of Jones College 

Ingenieur Civil des Mines (1948) University of Louvain, Belgium; M.S. (1950) Louisiana 

State University; Ph.D. (1952) University of California. Berkeley 
Dennis, John E., 1979. Noah Harding Professor of Applied Mathematics 

B.S. (1962), M.S. (1964) University of Miami; Ph.D. (1966) University of Utah 
Dermer, Charles D., 1991. Faculty Fellow in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1977) Harvey Mudd College; M.A. (1979) Dartmouth College; M.S. (1980), Ph.D. 

(1984) University of California. San Diego 
Derrick, Scott S., 1990. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. Albright College; M.A. (1978) University of Chicago; Ph.D. (1987) University of 

Pennsylvania 
Dessler, Alexander J., 1963. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1952) California Institute of Technology; Ph.D. (1956) Duke University 
D'Evelyn, Mark P., 1986. Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1977) University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D. (1982) University of Chicago 
Dharan, Bala G., 1982. Jesse H. Jones Distinguished Associate Professor of Accounting 

and Associate of Baker College 

B.Tech. (1973) Indian Institute of Technology, India; M.B.A. (1975) Indian Institute of 
Management, India; M.S. (1977), Ph.D. (1981) Carnegie Mellon University 



26 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Diddel, Roberta M., 1985. Adjunct Instructor of Psychology 

B.A. (1976) Wesleyan University; Ph.D. (1989) Boston University 
Dipboye, Robert, 1978. Professor of Psychology and Administrative Science and Asso- 
ciate of Sid Richardson College 

B.A. (1968) Baylor University; M.S. (1969), Ph.D. (1973) Purdue University 
Disch, James G., 1973. Associate Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

and Master of Sid Richardson College 

B.S. (1969), M.Ed. (1970) University of Houston; P.E.D. (1973) Indiana University 
Dix, Robert H., 1968. Lena Gohlman Fox Professor of Political Science and Associate of 

Baker College 

B.A. (1951), M.A. (1953), Ph.D. (1962) Harvard University 
Djidjev, Hristo, 1992. Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

B.S. (1979), M.S. (1980), Ph.D. (1984) Sofia University, Bulgaria 
Dobbins, Stella Maggio, 1 988. Lecturer on Art and Art History and Director of Sewall Art 

Gallery 

B.A. (1964) University of Illinois; M.A. (1982) University of Houston-Clear Lake 
Dodds, Stanley A., 1977. Associate Professor of Physics and Associate of Wiess College 

B.S. (1968) Harvey Mudd College; Ph.D. (1975) Cornell University 
Doody, Terrence Arthur, 1970. Professor of English and Associate of Jones College 

A.B. (1965) Providence College; M.A. (1969), Ph.D. (1970) Cornell University 1 

Dorough, Aralee, 1990. Artist Teacher, Flute 

B.Mus. (1983) Oberlin Conservatory of Music • ' 

Doughtie, Edward Orth, 1963. Professor of English 

A.B. (1958) Duke University; A.M. (1960), Ph.D. (1964) Harvard University 1 

Downs, Thomas D., 1971. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.S. (I960) Western Michigan University; M.P.H. (1962), Ph.D. (1965) University of 

Michigan 
Dravis, Jeffrey J., 1 987. Adjunct Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics ' 
.^ B.S.(1971)St. Mary's University; M.S. (1977)University of Miami, Florida; Ph.D. (1980) 

Rice University 
Drew, Katherine Fischer, 1950. Lynette S. Autrey Professor of History 

B.A. (1944), M.A. (1945) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1950) Cornell University 
Driskill, Linda P., 1970.Professor of English and Administrative Science and Associate 

of Brown College 

B.A. (1961), M.A. (1968), Ph.D. (1970) Rice University 
Droxler, Andre W., 1987. Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics and Resident 

Associate of Hanszen College 

Diploma (1978) University of Neuchatel, Switzerland; Ph.D. (1984) University of Miami, 

Florida 
Duck, Ian M., 1963. Professor of Physics a 

B.S. (1955) Queen's University, Canada; Ph.D. (1961) California Institute of Technology 
Dudey, Marc Peter, 1990. Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. (1980) University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; M.A. (1986) University of Southern 

California; Ph.D. (1984) Princeton University 
Dufour, Reginald J., 1975. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Associate of 

Brown College 

B.S. (1970) Louisiana State University; M.S. (1971), Ph.D. (1974) University of 

Wisconsin 
Duke, Cullen A., 1990. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.A. (1979), M. Accounting (1980) Rice University 



'"■AT2Ci'/A 1/IOITA5IT2J;": '^ ' {-{ 

Dunbar, Robert B., 1 98 1 . Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics and Master of 

Baker College 

B.S. (1975) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1981) University of California; San Diego 
Dunbar, Robyn Wright, 1989. Lecturer on Geology and Geophysics and Master of Baker 

College ' ^ 

B.A. (1978) Trinity University; M.A. (1980), Ph.D. ( 1984) Rice University 
Dunne, Carrin, 1975. Lecturer on Religious Studies ^^-^ 

B.A. (1955) University of St. Thomas; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (1970) University of Notre 

Dame 
Dunning, F. Barry, 1972. Professor of Physics and of Space Physics and Astronomy and 

Associate of Jones College 

B.Sc. (1966), Ph.D. (1969) University College, London. England 
Durrani, Ahmad J., 1 982. Associate Professor of Civil Engineering and Associate of Jones 

College 

B.S.C.E. (1968) Engineering University. Pakistan; M.S. (1975) Asian Institute of Tech- 
nology, Thailand; Ph.D. ( 1982) University of Michigan 
Dye, Ken, 1983. Lecturer on Music; Director, Marching Owl Band 

B.Mus. (1974) University of Southern California; M.A. (1980) California State Univer- 
sity, Long Beach; D.Ed. (1983) University of Houston 
Dyson, Derek C, 1966. Professor of Chemical Engineering and Associate of Sid 
Richardson College 

B.A. (1955) University of Cambridge, England; Ph.D. (1966) University of London, 
England 

Eaker, Helen Lanneau, 1964. Lecturer on Classics ^ ,j 

B.A. (1944), Ph.D. (1955) University of North Carolina ' .p 

Edge, Valerie, 1988. Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. (1963), M.S. ( 1977) Texas Women's University; Ed.D. (1989) University of Houston 
Eggers, Mitchell D., 1991. Lecturer on Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S. (1980), M.S. (1981), Ph.D. (1984) Texas A&M University ,.,., 

Eggert, Allen W. 1968. Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences ^ — -' ■ -• 

B.S. (1963) Rice University; M.A. (1967) California Western University 
Eifler, Margret, 1973. Professor of German and Slavic Studies and Associate of Hanszen 

College 

B.A. (1962), M.A. ( 1964), Ph.D. (1969) University of California. Berkeley 
Eisner, Elmer, 1988. Adjunct Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics 

B.S. (1939) Brooklyn College; Ph.D. (1943) The Johns Hopkins University 
Ellison, Paul V.H., 1975. Professor of Music '! 

B.M.E. (1965) Eastern New Mexico University; M.M. (1966) Northwestern University 
Engel, Paul S., 1970. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Jones College 

B.S. (1964) University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D. (1968) Harvard University 
Engelhardt, Hugo Tristram, Jr., 1982. Professor of Philosophy) 

B.A. (1963), Ph.D. (1969) University of Texas; M.D.( 1972) Tulane School of Medicine 
Ensor, Katherine Bennett, 1987. AssistantProfessor of Statistics and Associate of Lovett 

College 

B.S.E. (1981), M.S. (1982) Arkansas State University; Ph.D. (1986) Texas A&M 
University 

Erdely i, Csaba, 1 99 1 . Professor of Viola '^.; "■, Cf ,r >! A Or • ; . . 

Diploma (1965) Bartok Conservatory; Artist Teacher Diploma (1970) Franz Liszt 
Academy 



28 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Eschenbach, Christoph., 1989. Artist in Residence, Conducting State Conservatory of 

Music, Cologne; Hamburg Conservatory of Music 
Eskin, Suzanne G., 1982. Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering 

B.A. (1962), M.A. (1964) Rice University; Ph.D. (1969) University of Texas ^q 

Estle, Thomas L., 1967. Professor of Physics 

B.A. (1953) Rice Institute; M.S. (1954), Ph.D. (1957) University of Illinois 
Etnyre, Bruce R., 1984. Associate Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

and Associate of Jones College 

B.S. ( 1 973) Valparaiso University; M.S. (1977) Purdue University; Ph.D. (1984) Univer- 
sity of Texas at Austin ,,^ 
Evans, Jonathan P., 1992. Huxley Instructor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 

B.A. (1983) Cornell University; Ph.D. (1989) Duke University 
Fain, Michael, 1989. Lecturer on Humanities 

B.A. (1982), M.A. (1983), J.D. (1987) University of Houston 
Felleisen, Matthias, 1987. Associate Professor of Computer Science 

M.S. (1981) The University of Arizona; Ph.D. (1987) Indiana University 
Few, Arthur A. Jr., 1 970. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Environmental 

Science and Associate of Brown College 

B.S. (1962) Southwestern University; M.B.S. (1965) University of Colorado; Ph.D. (1969) 

Rice University 
Fischer, Jeanne K., 1992. Artist Teacher of Piano 

B.Mus. (1971) Oberlin College; M.Mus (1977) New England Conservatory of Music 
Fischer, Michael M. J., 1981. Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. ( 1967) Johns Hopkins University; M.A. (1969), Ph.D. (1973) University of Chicago 
Fischer, Norman, 1992. Professor of Cello 

B.Mus. (1971) Oberlin College " 

Fisher, Frank M., Jr., 1963. Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and 

Associate of Jones College 

B.A. (1953) Hanover College; M.S. (1958), Ph.D. (1961) Purdue University 
Fisher, G. D., 1973. Adjunct Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (1957) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1965) Johns Hopkins University 
Fishman, Talya, 1988. Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. (1 976) Wesleyan University; M.A. (1979) Jewish Theological Seminary of America; 

Ph.D. (1986) Harvard University 
Flatt, Robert N., 1987. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative Science "' ' 

B.A. (1969), M.E.E. (1970) Rice University; M.B.A. (1973) Harvard University 
Ford, Wally, 1982. Lecturer on Architecture '" "^ 

B.S. (1975), M.C.E. (1976) Rice University '. ■<nf-A'/ftijk£:. 

Forman, Robin, 1987. Associate Professor of Mathematics and Associate of Wiess 

College 

B. A. ( 1 98 1), M.A. ( 1 98 1 ) University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. ( 1 985) Harvard University 
Frankowski, Ralph F., 1 970. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

(] B.S. ( 1957), M.S. ( 1959) DePaul University; M.P.H. (1962). Ph.D. (1967) University of 
Michigan 

Fred, Herbert L., M.D., 1974. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences 

B.A. (1950) Rice Institute; M.D. (1954) Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine 
Freeman, John W., 1964. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Honorary 

Master of Lovett College 

B.S. (1957) Beloit College; M.S. ( 1961 ), Ph.D. (1963) University of Iowa 



-l-f/.TZOK-. /OiT .^>lT^i'/'lv■CA CI 

29 

•"- . - . . .... . ".. '-;f5?.i!*mo;) 

Friday, A. Randall, 1980. Lecturer on Accounting ; ^ 

B.B.A. (1973) University of Iowa; J.D.(1976) Stanford University 
Fukuyama, Tohru, 1978. Profes.sor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1971), M.A. (1973) Nagoya UniversUy, Japan: Ph.D. (1977) Harvard University 
Fultz, Lucille P., 1990. Assistant Professor of English 

A.B. (1959) Spelman College: M.A. (1968) University of Iowa; Ph.D. (1990) Emory 

University 
Gao, Zhiyong, 1986. Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. Fudan University (1979); Ph.D. ( 1984) State University of New York at Stony Brook 

A. A. (1965) University of Florida; M.D. (1969) Tulane Medical School ^r, ^j -jq 
Gardner, Gerald H.F., 1990. W. H. Keck Professor of Geophysics 

B.S. (1948) Trinity College, Dublin; M.Sc. (1949) Carnegie-Mellon University; Ph.D. 
( 1953) Princeton University 
Gaugler, Barbara B., 1987. Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S. ( 1978) St. Lawrence University; M.S. ( 198 1 ) Ohio University; Ph.D. ( 1987) Colorado 
State University 
Gehan, Edmund A., 1972. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A. (1951) Manhattan University; .M.S. (1953). Ph.D. (1957) North Carolina State 
University 
Georges, Eugenia, 1986. Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. (1970) Florida Presbyterian College; M.A. ( 1971 ) Tulane University; Ph.D. (1985) 

Columbia University 
Gessler, Mark D., 1991. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. (1983) Slippery Rock University: M.B.A. (1988) University of Tennessee 
Gibson, Kathleen R,, 1981. Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. ( 1963) University of Michigan; M.A. (1969). Ph.D. (1970) University of California, 
Berkeley 
Giles, Wayne Rodney, 1988. Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Ba.Sc. (1969). M.Sc. (1970) University of Alberta: M.Phil (1971), Ph.D. (1974) Yale 

University 
Glantz, Raymon M., 1969. Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.A. (1963) Brooklyn College: M.S. ( 1964). Ph.D. ( 1966) Syracuse University 

Glass, Graham P., 1 967. Professor of Chemistry and Dean of Graduate Studies ' 

B.S. (1960) Birmingham University, England; Ph.D. (1963) Cambridge University, 
England 

Glowinski, Roland, 1986. Adjunct Profes.sorofComputational and Applied Mathematics 

Ph.D. ( 1970) University of Paris 
Goldman, Nathan C, 1989. Lecturer on Political Science 

B. A. ( 1 972 ) University of South Carolina: J. D. ( 1 975 ) Duke University: M.A. ( 1 978), Ph.D. 

( 1980) Johns Hopkms University f, 

Goldman, Ronald N., 1990. Professor of Computer Science 

B.S. (1968) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A., Ph.D. (1973) Johns Hopkins 

University 
Goldsmith, Kenneth, 1991. Associate Professor of Violin -i-M;!.' ,-.■.;.'■ 

B.M. (1966) George Peabody College for Teachers; M.A. (1968) Leiand Stanford 

University 
Goldsberry, Betty S. 1988. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (1965) Central State University; M.A. (1978) Framingham State College; Ph.D. 
(1984) Rice University 



txl k 



30 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Gomer, Richard H., 1988. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.A. (1977) Pomona College; Ph.D. (1980) California Institute of Technology 
Gordon, Chad, 1 970. Professor of Sociology and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.S. (1957), M.A. (1962), Ph.D. (1963) University of California, Los Angeles 
Gorry, G. Anthony, 1 976. Professor of Computer Science and Vice President for Research 

and Information Technology 

B.E. (1962) Yale University; M.S. (1963) University of California-Berkeley; Ph.D. 

(1967)M.I.T. 
Gosain, Narendra K., 1981. Lecturer in Civil Engineering 

B.A. (1963) University of Rajasthan, India; M.A. (1965) University of Roorkee, India; 

Ph.D. (1973) Rice University 
Gottlieb, David, 1991. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.A. (1955) Wayne State University; Ph.D. (1960) University of Chicago 
Gottschalk, Arthur W., 1977. Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus. (1974), M.A. (1975), D.M.A. (1978) University of Michigan 
Goux, Jean- Joseph, 1990. Lawrence H. Favrot Professor of French 

Licence de Philosophic (1965), D.E.S. Philosophic (1966), Doctoral du 3eme cycle de 

Philosophic (1973), Doctorat d'Etat es Lettres et Sciences Humaines (1988) Sorbonne, 

Paris 
Gow, Robert H., 1987. Lecturer on Administrative Science . , 

B.A. (1955) Yale University 
Grandy, Richard E., 1980. Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. (1963) University of Pittsburgh; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (1968) Princeton University 
Griffin, Campbell A., Jr., 1992. Adjunct Professor of Administrative Science 

A.B. (1951), A.M. (1952) University of Missouri; J.D. (1957) University of Texas 
Grob, Alan, 1961. Professor of English and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1952) Utica College; M.A. (1957), Ph.D. (1961) University of Wisconsin 
Gruber, Ira Dempsey, 1966. Harris Masterson, Jr. Professor of History and Associate of 

Hanszen College 
' A.B. (1955). M.A. (1959). Ph.D. (1961) Duke University 
Gustin, Michael C, 1988. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

A.B. ( 1974) The Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D. ( 1981) Yale University 
Hacker, Carl S., 1973. Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics * 

B.S. (1963) William and Mary University; Ph.D. (1968) Rice University 
Halas, Naomi J., 1989. Assistant Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.A. (1980) La Salle College; M.A. (1984), Ph.D. (1986) Bryn Mawr College 
Hamm, Keith Edward, 1988. Associate Professor of Political Science 

A.B. (1969) Franklin and Marshall College; M.A. (1972) Florida Atlantic University; 

Ph.D. (1977) University of Wisconsin 
Hammond, Michael P., 1986. Elma Schneider Professor of Music, Dean of the Shepherd 

School of Music and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1959) Lawrence University; Honors B.A. (1959), M.A. ( 1961 ) Oxford University; 

L.H.D. (Hon.) (1975) Lawrence University 
Hanks, Milton, 1981. Lecturer on Civil Engineering 

A.S. (1964), B.B.A.S. (1964), M.Ed. (1977) University of Houston 
Hannan, John K., 1991 . Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.A. (1975) Rice University; J.D. (1988) South Texas College of Law 



T-lAXa Q'AA '/[OITA>lT81MIMaA jip 

Hannon, James P., 1 967. Professor of Physics and Associate of Wiess College "'^" 

B.A. (1962). M.A. (1965). Ph.D. (1967) Rice University 
Harcombe, EInora (Nonie), 1989. Assistant Professor and Project Director, Center for 

Education 

B.S. ( 1967) University of Michigan; M.Phil. (1969) Yale University; Ph.D. (1975) Yale 

University. 
Harcombe, Paul A., 1972. Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Associate 

of Lovett College '.iiwi 

B.S. (1967) Michigan State University; Ph.D. (1973) Yale University 
Hardt, Robert M., 1988. W. L. Moody, Jr. Professor of Mathematics ladj ,ll:rV9H 

B.S. (1967) M.I.T.; Ph.D. (1971) Brown University . Iv-Oi) t.H ^ 

Haris, Ali K., 1988. Lecturer on Civil Engineering io??.d\<nH .ricWI .nai^fil -ortsmvaT^i 

B.S. (1966) University of Baghdad; M.S. (1968) Stanford; Ph.D. (1972) University of 
Texas 

Harland, Peter W., 1989. Adjunct Professor of Chemistry 

B.Sc. (1968) University of Wales. Aberystwyth; Ph.D. (1971) Edinburgh University 
Harter, Deborah A., 1990. Assistant Professor of French 

B.A. (1973) University of California, Los Angeles; M.A. (1980). Ph.D. (1989) University 
of California, Berkeley 
Hartley, Peter Reginald, 1986. Associate Professor of Economics and Associate of Will 
Rice College 

B.A. (1974), M.Ec. (1977) Australian National University; Ph.D. (1980) University of 

Chicago 
Harvey, F. Reese, 1968. Edgar Odell Lovett Professor of Mathematics B.S., M.A. (1963) 

Carnegie Institute of Technology; Ph.D. (1966) Stanford University 
Haskell, Thomas L., 1970. Samuel G. McCann Professor of History '"''-' "^ '^'^ 

B.A. (1961) Princeton University; Ph.D.(1973) Stanford University ^ '^'•"-' '"•*'«-»i>" 
Hauge, R.H., 1967. Distinguished Faculty Fellow in Chemistry ^:^' ^ ■^■^ 

B.A. (1960) Loras College; Ph.D. (1965) University of California - Berkeley ' "^^'^ 

Hauser, Nickolaus, 1986. Lecturer on Administrative Science ' 

B.S. ( 1971 ), M.S. (1973) Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn; M.B.A. (1985) University of 
Houston 

Havens, Neil, 1964. Professor of Drama and Honorary Associate of Jones College 

B.A. ( 1956) Rice Institute; M.A. ( 1959) Indiana University 
Hawthorn, Jonathan, 1988. Associate Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and 

Associate of Will Rice College 

B.S. (1981) University of Astron, Birmingham, England; Ph.D. (1986) Angl,p;Ai>straj[;an, 

Observatory. Sydney, Australia , \ ; , a a 

Hayes, Edward F., 1987. Adjunct Professor of Chemistry ^ 

B.S. (1963) University of Rochester; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (1966) The Johns Hopkins 

University 
Haymes, Robert C, 1964. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and Associate of 

Will Rice College 

B.A. (1952), M.S. (1953). Ph.D. (1959) New York University ^'"H 

Hazlewood, Carlton F., 1970. Adjunct Professor of Biophysics in the Physics Department 

B.S. (1957) Texas A&M University; Ph.D. ( 1962) University of Tennessee Medical Units 
at Memphis 
Heclelman, Elizabeth Walker, 1992 

B.A. (1973) Whitman College; Ph.D. (1985) Claremont Graduate School £.H 



32 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Heitman, Elizabeth, 1987. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Religious Studies 

B.A. (1979). M.A. (1985), Ph.D. (1988) Rice University 
Heliums, Jesse David, 1960. A.J. Hartsook Professor of Chemical Engineering and 

Associate of Wiess College 

B.S. (1950), M.S. (1958) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1961) University of Michigan 
Hempel, John, 1964. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (1957) University of Utah; M.S. (1959), Ph.D. (1962) University of Wisconsin nU 
Henson, Troy F., 1987. Lecturer in Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S. (1965). M.S. (1966). University of Arkansas; Ph.D. (1975) University of Texas 
Hewitt, Charles H., 1987. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. (1951) Montana School of Mines; M.S. (1953), Ph.D. (1956) University of Michigan 
Heymann, Dieter, 1966. Professor of Geology and Geophysics and of Space Physics and 

Astronomy and Associate of Lovett College .fiT^i 

M.S. (1954). Ph.D. (1958) University of Amsterdam, Netherlands ^ '"-'■ 

Hightower, Joe W., 1967. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and 

Associate of Baker College 

B.S. (1959) Harding College; M.A. (1961), Ph.D. (1963) Johns Hopkins University '>" 
Hill, Albina Serebryakova, 1 982. Lecturer on Russian and Associate of Will Rice College 

M.A. (1959) Sverdlorsk Pedagogical Institute 
Hill, Thomas W., 1979. Distinguished Faculty Fellow in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.A. (1967), M.S. (1971), Ph.D. (1973) Rice University 
Hirasaki, George J., 1989. Professor in Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (1963) Lamar University; Ph.D. (1967) Rice University .^l< 

Hobby, William P., 1989. Radoslav A. Tsanoff Professor of Public Affairs 

B.A. ( 1953) Rice University 
Hockett, Charles F., 1991 . Adjunct Professor of Linguistics 

B.A. (1932), M.A. ( 1936) Ohio State University; Ph.D. (1939) Yale University ^^ 

Holloway, Clyde, 1977. Professor of Music 

B.Mus. (1957), M.Mus. (1959) University of Oklahoma; D.S.M. (1974) Union Theological 

Seminary 
Holt, Edward C, 1956. Professor of Civil Engineering 

S.B. (1945), S.M. (1947) Massachusetts Institue of Technology; Ph.D. (1956) Pennsyl- 
vania State University 
House, Waylon V., 1986. Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. ( 1 966) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S. (1 969), PJ),D. C,1^7£) University 

of Pittsburgh ' " " " ~"' ' 

Howard, Richard, 1991 . Adjunct Professor of English 

B.A. (1951), M.A. (1952) Columbia University ,_;.• 

Hsi, Barthotomew P., 1973. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

M.A. (1962), Ph.D. ( 1964) University of Minnesota 
Huang, Huey W., 1973. Professor of Physics gH 

B.S. (1962) National Taiwan University: Ph.D. (1967) Cornell University 
Huberman, Brian Michael, 1975. Associate Professor of Art H 

Certificate ( 1 974) National Film School of Great Britain . .iii j 

Hudspeth, C. M., 1947. Lecturer on Political Science and Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. (1940) Rice Institute; J.D. (1946) University of Texas 
Hulet, Randall G., 1987, Associate Professor of Physics and Associate of Jones College 

B.S. (1978) Standord University; Ph.D. (1984) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



- - ■ - • 33 

Huston, J. Dennis, 1969. Professor of English and Master of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1961) Wesley an University; M.A. (1964), Ph.D. (1966) Yale University 
Hutchinson, John S., 1983. Associate Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Lovett 

College 

B.S. (1977), Ph.D. (1980) University of Texas 
Hwu, Shiou-Jyh, 1988. Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Will Rice 

College 

B.S. (1978) Fu-Jen Catholic University; Ph.D. (1985) Iowa State University 
Hyman, Harold M., 1 968. William P. Hobby Professor of History and Associate of Lovett 

College 

B.A. (1948) University of California, Los Angeles; M.A. (1950), Ph.D. (1952) Columbia 

University 
lammarino, Nicholas K., 1978. Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences, 

Associate of Sid Richardson College, and Pre-med Advisor 

B.S. ( 1973) University of Dayton; M.Ed. ( 1975) Univershy of Toledo; Ph.D. ( 1978) Ohio 

State University 
Ikenberry, David L., 1990. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. (1983) Pennsylvania State University; M.M. ( 1985) Northwestern University; Ph.D. 

(1990) University of Illinois oa.'i-^ifiJ 

Ingersoll, Richard J., 1986. Assistant Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (1979) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1985) University of California, 

Berkeley q r . . ^ . . . ,. 

Isle, Walter WhitHeld, 1962. Professor of English '"'♦": ' _ ; " ," n'^iV;;^;" ■''^' 

A.B. (1955) Harvard University; M.A. (1957) University of Michigan; Ph.D. (1961) 

Stanford University 
Jaber, Thomas L, 1988. Assistant Professor of Music and Director of Choral Ensembles 

B.M.E. (1974) Arkansas State University; M.Mus. (1976) Indiana University 
Jansson, Birger, 1975. Adjunct Professor of Statistics y-A 8 ■ 

B.A.(1946), Ph.D. (1965) University of Stockholm, Sweden ' - 

Johnson, Don Herrick, 1977. Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer 

Engineering and Associate of Will Rice College 

S.B., S.M. (1970). E.E. (1971), Ph.D. (1974) Massachusetts Institute of Technology ^ 

Johnston, Dennis A„ 1974. Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics 

B .S. ( 1 965 ) Arlington State College; M.A. (1966) University of Texas; Ph.D. (197 1 ) Texas^, 
Tech University .-.--■• 

Johnston, Holly Hanson, 1990. Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.A. (1980) Westminster College; M.S. (1983), Ph.D. (1990) Carnegie Mellon University 
Jones, B, Frank, Jr., 1962. Noah Harding Professor of Mathematics 

B.A. ( 1958) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1961 ) Rice University 
Jones, Elizabeth A., 1989. Lecturer on Communication 

B.A. (1973) Wayland Baptist University; M.A. (1976) University of Houston ._^ - 
Jones, Roy G., 1967. Associate Professor of Slavic Studies , , p 

B.A. ( 1954). M.A. (1954) East Texas Stale University; Ph.D. (1965) University of Texas 
Jones, Samuel, 1973. Professor of Music and Honorary Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (1957) Millsaps College; M.A. (1958). Ph.D. (1960) Eastman School of Music,; 

University of Rochester 
Jump, J. Robert, 1 968 . Professor of Computer Science in the Department of Electrical and 

Computer Engineering 

B.S. (I960). M.S. (1962) University of Cincinnati; M.S. (1965). Ph.D. (1968) University 

of Michigan 



34 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Kamberov, George I., 1990. G.C. Evans Instructor of Mathematics 

B.A. ( 1982) University of Sofia, Bulgaria; Ph.D. (1990) University of Pennsylvania 
Kamins, Benjamin C, 1987. Artist Teacher of Bassoon 
Karff, Samuel E., 1979. Lecturer on Religious Studies 

A.B. (1949) Gratz College of Jewish Studies; A.B. (1953) Harvard College; M.A.H.L. 

(1956), D.H.L. (1961) Hebrew Union College 
Kauffmann, Robert Lane, 1976. Associate Professor of Spanish and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.A. (1970) Princeton University; Ph.D. (1981) University of California, San Diego 
Keeley, Jack W., 1980. Adjunct Professor in the Department of Environmental Science 

and Engineering 

B.S. (1957) University of Oklahoma; S.M. (1958) Harvard University 
Kehoe, John K., 1988. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.A. (1960) Northwestern University; M. A. (1964) St. Louis University; D.B.A. (1974) 

Harvard University 
Kelber, Werner H., 1973. Isla Carroll Turner and Percy E. Turner Professor of 

Religious Studies 

M.T. (1963) Princeton Theological Seminary; M.A. (1967), Ph.D. (1970) University of 

Chicago 
Kelly, Joseph L., 1991 . Lecturer on Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science 

B.A. (1954). B.S.M.E. (1955), M.S. (1961) Rice University 
Kendall, Richard P., 1 98 1 . Adjunct Professor of Computational and ^ ^l^j 

Applied Mathematics 

B.A. (1963), M.A. (1969) University of Texas; M.A. (1970), Ph.D. (1972) Rice Univer- 
sity 
Kennedy, Kenneth W., Jr., 1971. Noah Harding Professor in Mathematics in the 

Department of Computer Science 

B.A. (1967) Rice University; M.S. (1969), Ph.D. (1971) New York University 
Kim, Dae Mann, 1970. Professor in the Department of Electrical and , 

Computer Engineering 

B.S. (1960) Seoul National University, Korea; M.S. (1965), Ph.D. ( 1967) Yale University 
Kimmel, Marek, 1990. Associate Professor of Statistics 

M.S. (1977). Ph.D. ( 1980) Silesian Technical University 
Kimura, Mineo, 1988. Adjunct Associate Profes.sor in Physics 

B.S. ( 1970) Waseda University, Japan; M.Sc. (1972) University of Tokyo; Ph.D. (1981) 

University of Alberta, Canada 
King, Garry C, 1988. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology : 

B.S. ( 1980), Ph.D. (1984) University of Sydney, Australia 
Kinsey, James L., 1987. D.R. Bullard-Welch Foundation Professor of Science in 

Department of Chemistry and Dean of Natural Sciences and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

B.A. ( 1956), Ph.D. (1959) Rice University 
Kiperman, Anita, 1976. Lecturer on Spanish and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1957) Universidad Nacional de Buenos Aires; M.A. (1971) University of Houston 
Kirk, David E., 1982. Lecturer on Music, Tuba 

B.M. (1982) JuiUiard School of Music 
Klein, Anne C, 1989. Associate Professor of Religious Studies 

B.A. ( 1969) SUNY at Binghamton; M.A. ( 197 1 ) University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. (1981) 

University of Virginia _, , 



35 

Klineberg, Stephen L., 1972. Professor of Sociology and Associate of Lovett College 
B.A. (1961) Haverford College; M.A. (1963) University of Paris. France; Ph.D. (1966) 
Harvard University 

Kobayashi, Riki, 195 1 . Louis Calder Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineer- 
ing and Associate of Will Rice College tj. > 
B.S. (1944) Rice Institute; M.S.E. (1947), Ph.D. (1951) University of Michigan 

Krentel, Mark, 1 987. Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Associate of Will Rice 
College 
B.S. (1978), M.S. (1980) Clarkson University; Ph.D. (1987) Cornell 

Krishen, Kumar, 1986. Adjunct Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engi- 
neering 

B.A. (1959) Jammu & Kashmir University; M.S. (1966), Ph.D. (1969) Kansas State 
University 

Krouskop, Thomas A., 1 990. Adjunct Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Materials 
Science 
B.A. (1967), M.A. (1969), Ph.D. (1971) Carnegie Mellon University ...., , 

Kulstad, Mark, 1975. Associate Professor of Philosophy and Associate of Hanszen 
College 
B.A. (1969) Macalester College; Ph.D. (1975) University of Michigan , 

Lairson, David Robert, 1977. Adjunct Associate Professor of Economics „,^,;^p 

B.A. (1970), M.A., Ph.D. (1975) University of Kentucky .Yi!e-s<loJ 

Lam, Tsz Kin, 1990. G.C. Evans Instructor of Mathematics 

B.Sc. (1984) Chinese University of Hong Kong; Ph.D. (1990) State University of New 
York at Stony Brook , . . 

Lamb, Sydney M., 1981 . Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor of Linguistics r , ^^.^^ 

B.A. (1951) Yale University; Ph.D. (1958) University of California, Berkeley |;T| onoJ 

Lamos, Colleen R., 1989. Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. (1978) State University of New York at Binghamton; Ph.D. (1988) University of 

Pennsylvania 
Lane, David M., 1976. Associate Professor of Psychology and Statistics and Associate of 

Lovett College 

B.A. (1971) Clark University; M.A. (1973) Tufts University; Ph.D. (1977) Tulane 

University : ■n^-oH 

Lane, NealF., 1966. Professor of Physics and Provost of the University jfi:r--^/'_ mu.l 

B.S. (1960), M.S. (1962), Ph.D. (1964) University of Oklahoma , ^ ".,,,,, 

Laughery, Kenneth R., 1982. Henry R. Luce Professor of Psychology .oi^y', . *,; i i 

B.S.(1957). M.S. (1959), Ph.D. (1961) Carnegie-Mellon University . ' . . 
Laux, Lila F., 1988. Adjunct Lecturer on Psychology 

B.S. (1961) Rice University; M.S. (1979) University of Southwestern Louisiana; Ph.D. 

(1986) Rice University 
Lavenda, Richard A., 1987. Associate Professor of Theory and Composition and 

Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1977) Dartmouth College; M.Mus. ( 1979) Rice University D.M.A. ( 1983) Univer- 
sity of Michigan 
Leal, Maria Teresa, 1965. Professor of Spanish and Portuguese, and Resident Associate 

of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1946) Pontificia Universidade Catolica, Brazil; Ph.D. (1963) Universidade Federal 
Ledley, Tamara A.S., 1985. Senior Faculty Fellow in the Center for Space Physics and 

Astronomy 

B.S. (1976) University of Maryland; Ph.D. ( 1983) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



36 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Lee, Eva J., 1969 Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences, arid Associate 

of Jones College 

B.S. ( 1962) North Texas State University; M.Ed. ( 1967) Sam Houston State University, 

Ed.D. (1974) Louisiana State University 
Leeman, William P., 1977. Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.A. (1967), M.A. (1969) Rice University, Ph.D. (1974) University of Orgeon 
Levander, Alan R., 1984. Associate Professor of Geophysics and Resident Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.S. (1976) University of South Carolina: M.S. (1978), Ph.D. (1984). Stanford University 
Liang, Edison P., 1991 . Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.A. (1967). Ph.D. (1971) University of California. Berkeley 
Lindley, Juanita W.. 1986.Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences *| 

B.A.T. ( 1976) Sam Houston State University: .M.S. (1977) James Madison University . 
Lidvall, Christine .A., 1988. Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences 

S.S. (1969) Northwestern University: M.A. ( 1983) University of Houston 
Loewenheim, Francis Lippmann, 1959. Professor of History 

A.B. ( 1947), A.M. ( 1948) University of Cincinnati: Ph.D. ( 1952) Columbia University 

Logan, Marie-Rose, 1983. Associate Professor of French 

Licence en Philoloaie Classique (1966): Agregation de Philosophie et Lettres (1967) 
Universite Libre de Bruxelles: M.Ph. ( 1970). M.A. (1972). Ph.D. ( 1974) Yale University 

Lohrenz, Terry, 1992. G.C. Evans Instructor of Mathematics 

.A.B. (1984) Harvard University: Ph.D. (1991) Rutgers University 
Lombard, Jeanette, 1982. Artist Teacher of Voice 

Artists Diploma ( 1957) Teatro Lirico Sperimentale di Spoleto, Italy: Certificate ( 1958) 

Accademia di Santa Cecilia. Rome. Italy 
Long, Elizabeth, 1978. Associate Professor of Sociology and Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1966) Stanford University: M.A. (1974). Ph.D. (1979) Brandeis University 
Long, Kelly A., 1988. Assistant Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. (1982) University of Illinois: M.S. (1983) Colorado State University; Ph.D. (1988) 

Kansas University 
Longino, Helen, 1990. Associate Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. (1966) Barnard College: M.A. (1967) University of Sussex; Ph.D. (1973) Johns 

Hopkins University 
Luca, Sergiu, 1983. Dorothy Richard Starling Professor of Violin 

Artists Diploma ( 1966) Curtis Institute of Music 
Lurie, Susan, 1987. Assistant Professor of English and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. ( 1969). SUNY; M.A. ( 1972). Ph.D. (1989) University of California, Berkeley 
Lynch, Edward C, 1970. Adjunct Professor in the Biomedical Engineering Laboratory 

A.B. (1953), .M.D. (1956) University of Washington 
Maas, Michael, 1984. Associate Professor of History and Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1973) Cornell University: M.A. (1974). Ph.D. (1982) University of California. 

Berkeley 
Malone, David R., 1983. Lecturer in Music. Double Bass 

B.Mus. (1981), M.Mus. (1981) Shepherd School of Music. Rice University 
Manca, Joseph, 1989. Assistant Professor of Art and Art History 

B.A. (1978) University of Rochester; M.A. ( 1980). M.Phil. (1982), Ph.D. (1986) Colum- 
bia University 
Mandel, James P., 1986. Lecturer on Accounting 

B.S. (1967), M. B.A. (.1969), Ph.D. (1973) University of Illinois , 



- . ■ - 3r 

Marcus, George E., 1975. Professor of Anthropology and Associate of Richardson 

College 

B.A. (1968) Yale University; Ph.D. (1976) Harvard University 
Mardis, Jerlyn Leigh, 1988. Lecturer on Communication 

BA. (1973), M.B.P.M. (1982) Rice University '^^^' 

Marenchin, Leslie M., 1990. Mellon Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A. (1976) Millersville University; M.A. (1983), Ph.D. (1987) Rice University ,^ , 
Margrave, John L., 1963. E.D. Butcher Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. (1948), Ph.D. (1951) University of Kansas 
Martin, Randi C, 1982. Associate Professor of Psychology and Associate of Baker 

College 

B.A. (1971) University of Oregon; M.S. (1977), Ph.D. (1979) Johns Hopkins University 
Martin, William C, 1968. Professor of Sociology and Associate of Richardson College 

B.A. (1958), M.A. (1960) Abilene Christian College; B.D. (1963) Harvard Divinity 

School; Ph.D. (1969) Harvard University 
Massey, Richard P., 1989. Lecturer in Electrical and Computer Engineering ,,^ , ^ 

B.A. (1953), B.S. (1954) Rice University; M.S. (1962) Columbia University ^^^ .. ,j, 
Matherly, Cheryl A., 1992. Lecturer on Humanities , 

B.A. (1989) University of New Mexico; M.S. (1991) Indiana University 
Matthews, Kathleen Shive, 1972. Harry C. Wiess and Olga Keith Wiess Professor of 

Biochemistry 

B.S. (1966) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1970) University of California, Berkeley 
Matusow, Allen Joseph, 1963. William Gaines Twyman Professor of History and Dean 

of the School of Humeinities 

B.A. (1958) Ursinus College; M.A. (1959), Ph.D. (1963) Harvard University , ^ 
McCormack, John, 1989. Adjunct Professor of Administrative Science f[/ ^^j^^) / 

McDonald, Edward D., 1 990. Adjunct Professor of Administrative Science y^x 

B.S. (1962), M.S. (1964) Rice University ;"%'■■;.-' 

McEvilley, Thomas, 1969. Visiting Lecturer on Art History .^r ;,: ;-i 

B.A. (1963) University of Cincinnati; M.A. (1965) University of Washington; Ph.D. 

(1968) University of Cincinnati 
Mclntire, Larry V., 1970. E.D. Butcher Professor of Chemical and Biomedical 

Engineering 

B.Ch.E., M.S. (1966) Cornell University; M.A. (1968), Ph.D. (1970) Princeton 

University , , 

Mcintosh, Roderick J., 1980. Professor of Anthropology ''<^ ' -'f; -' 'Ai''- 

B.A. (1973) Yale University; M.Litt. (1975), Ph.D. (1979) Trinity College, University of 

Cambridge, England 
Mcintosh, Susan Keech, 1980. Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. (1975) Girton College, University of Cambridge; M.A. (1976), Ph.D. (1979) 

University of California, Santa Barbara .\ <■; 

McKee, Elysabeth Y.B., 1990. Assistant Professor of Architecture "^ .T->!til/ 

B.F.A. (1981) University of Massachusetts; M.Arch. (1984) Yale Unviersity 
McKenny, Gerald P., 1989. Assistant Professor of Religious Studies 

A. B. (1979) Wheaton; M.Div. (1982) Prmceton; Ph.D. (1989) University of Chicago 
McLellan, Rex B., 1964. Professor of Materials Science and Associate of Brown College 

B.Met. (1957) Sheffield University, England: Ph.D. (1962) Leeds University, England 
McNeil, Linda M., 1 984. Associate Professor of Education and Associate of Jones College 

B.A. (1966), Texas Tech University: M.A. (1968). Baylor University; Ph.D. (1977) 

University of Wisconsin-Madison 



38 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Meade, Andrew, J., 1989. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials 
Science 

B.S. (1982) Rice University; M.S. (1984) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. 
(1989) University of California, Berkeley 
Meakin, Christopher H., 1992. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.B.A. (1983) Texas A&M University; J.D. (1987) University of Houston; M.A. (1988) 
Rice University 
Meconi, Honey, 1987. Assistant Professor of Musicology in the Shepherd School of Music 

A.B. (1974) Pennsylvania State University; A.M. (1980) Harvard University; Ph.D. 

(1986) Harvard University 
Meixner, John, 1968. Professor of English and Associate of Sid Richardson College ''" 

B.A. (1951)City College of New York; M.A. (1953), Ph.D. (1957) Brown University 
Mellor-Crummy, John M., 1989. Faculty Fellow in Computer Science 

B.S.E. (1984) Princeton University; M.S. (1986). Ph.D. (1989) University of Rochester 
Mersereau, Rebecca, 1 99 1 . Assistant Professor of Art and Art History 

B.A. (1978) Indiana University; M.A. (1982) University of Missouri; M.A. (1986), Ph.D. 

(1 99 1 ) Bryn Mawr College 
Merwin, John E., 1955. Professor in the Department of Civil Engineering ^ , 

B.A. (1952), B.S.M.E. (1953). M.S.M.E. (1955) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1962) University 

of Cambridge. England 
Michel, F. Curtis, 1963. Andrew Hays Buchanan Professor of Astrophysics in the 

Departments of Space Physics and Astronomy and of Physics and Associate of Jones 

College 
' B.A. (1955). Ph.D. (1962) California Institute of Technology '^' 

Michie, Helena, 1990. Associate Professor of English 

B.A. (1979) Princeton University; Ph.D. (1984) University of Pennsylvania 
Miele, Angelo, 1964. Professor of Aerospace Sciences and Mathematical Sciences ' ' 

Dr. C.E. (1944), Dr. A. E. (1946) University of Rome, Italy 
Mieszkowski, Peter, 1981. Allyn R. and Gladys M. Cline Professor of Economics and 

Finance *"' 

B.S. (1957). M.A. (1959) McGill University; Ph.D. (1963) Johns Hopkins University 
Miettinen, Hannu E., 1977. Associate Professor of Physics 

Fil. Kand. ( 1 967), Fil. Lie. ( 1 97 1 ) University of Helsinki. Finland; Ph.D. ( 1 975) University 

of Michigan 
Mikos, Antonios G., 1991. Assistant Professor in Chemical Engineering 

Diploma (1983) Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece; M.S. ( 1985), Ph.D. (1988) 

Purdue University \f. 

Milburn, Ellsworth, 1975. Professor of Music and Associate of Baker College 

A.B. (1962) University of California, Los Angeles; M.A. (1968) Mills College; D.M.A. 

College-Conservatory of Music, University of Cincinnati 
Miller, Christopher M., 1991. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science 

B.A. (1982), M.S. (1983) University of Santa Cruz; Ph.D. (1990) University of Oregon 
Miller, Clarence A., 1981. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and 

Associate of Baker College 

B.A., B.S. (1961) Rice University; Ph.D. (1969) University of Minnesota 
Miller, Mindi, 1989. Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. (1973) Southern Missionary College; M.S. (1976) University of Florida; M.A. 

(1980) University of New Mexico; Ph.D. (1985) Rice University 
Milun, Kathryn, 1991. Assistant Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. (1978), M.A. (1988), Ph.D- (1991) University of Minnesota 

fiogibeM-nif!no3<;i ' 



Minter, David, 1990. Libbie Sheam Moody Professor of English and Master of Jones 

College 

B.A. (1957), M.A. (1959) North Texas State University: B.D. (1961). Ph.D. (1965) Yale 

University 
Mitchell, E. Douglas, 1981 . Adjunct Professor of Linguistics and Semiotics 

B.A. (1952) Baylor University; Ph.D. (1966) University of Texas 
Moorhead, Louise C, 1986. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.A. (1969) University of South Florida; M.D. (1973) Univ. of Florida, Gainesville 
Morgan, T. Clifton, 1987. Associate Professor of Political Science and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

B.A. (1978) University of Oklahoma; M.A. (1980), Ph.D. (1986) University of Texas at 

Austin „.. ... , 

Morris, Wesley Abram, 1968. Professor of Enghsh \ ■ -^ ' ^ '■ - -'-^ "..,.- .r 

B.A. (1961), M.A. (1963) University of Kentucky; Ph.D. (1968) University of Iowa 
Morrison, Donald Ray, 1988. Assistant Professor of Philosophy and Resident Associate 

of Richardson College 

B.A. (1977) Carleton College; Ph.D. (1983) Princeton University 
Morshedi, A. Michael, 1987. Adjunct Professor of Computational and Applied 

Mathematics .'- • 

B.S. (1969), M.S. (1971), Ph.D. (1973) university of Missouri " -v. , 

Murphree, Dennis E., 1992. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.A. (1969) Southern Methodist University; M.B.A. (1971) University of Pennsylvania 
Murray, Russell, 1990. Visiting Assistant Professor of Music History and Musicology 

B.A., B.M.E. (1978), University of Redlands; M.M.E. ( 1980), Ph.D. (1989) University of 

North Texas 
Murray, William B., 1992. Associate J*rofessor of Voice 

B.A. (1956) Adelphi University; Certificate (1958) Universita de Perugia; Certificate 

(1958) Yale University School of Languages; Certificate (1960) Goethe Institut, 

Blaubeuren, Germany 
Mutchler, Gordons., 1968. Professor of Physics „_ ,, 

B.S. (1960), Ph.D. (1966) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Napier, H. Albert, 1983. Associate Professor of Administrative Science and Psychology 

B.A. (1966), M.B.A. (1968), Ph.D. (1971) University of Texas at Austin 
Nelson, Deborah Hubbard, 1974. Professor of French and Associate of Brown College 

B.A. (1960) Wittenberg University; Certificat d'etudes Francaises, ler Degre (1961) 

University of Grenoble, France; M.A. (1964), Ph.D. (1970) Ohio State University 
Newman, James H., 1 985. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.A. (1978) Dartmouth College; M.A. (1982), Ph.D. (1984) Rice University 
Newton, Norma, 1982. Artist Teacher of Voice , ^ 

B.Mus. (1958) Syracuse University; M.Mus (1962) University of Texas '. n v ■'•.' 
Nirenberg, David, 1992. Assistant Professor of History Ti^- 

B.A. (1986) Yale University; M.A. (1989), Ph.D. (1992) Princeton University 
Noble, Stephen T., 1986. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1980) Florida Institute of Technology; M.S. (1983), Ph.D. (1985) Rice University 
Nordgren, Ronald P., 1989. Herman and George R. Brown Professor of Civil 

Engineering and Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Associate of 

Will Rice College 

B.S. (1957), M.S. (1958) University of Michigan; Ph.D. (1962) University of California, 

Berkeley 



40 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Norlander, Peter, 1989. Assistant Professor of Physics " " ' ".r j ^ .: 'r-IT." 

B.A. (1977) Swedish Cavalry Officers School; M.S. (1980), Ph.D. (1985) Chalmers 

University of Technology, Gothemburg, Sweden 
O'Dell, Charles Robert, 1982. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S.Ed. (1959) Illinois State University; Ph.D. (1962) University of Wisconsin 
Odhiambo, Atieno, 1988. Professor of History 

B.A. (1970) Makerere University College; Ph.D. (1973) University of Nairobi 
Oldow, John Steven, 1978. Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1972) University of Washington; Ph.D. (1978) Northwestern University 
Olson, John Steven, 1973. Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.S. (1968) University of Illinois; Ph.D. (1972) Cornell University 
Overall, John E., 1983. Adjunct Professor of Psychology ^ 

B.S. (1954) Trinity University; M.A. (1956), Ph.D. (1958) University of Texas, Austin 
Page, Paula, 1985. Artist Teacher, Harp 

B.Mus. (1969) Cleveland Institute of Music 
Palmer, Graham A., 1 974. Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Associate of 

Sid Richardson College 

B.S. (1957), Ph n. (1962) University of Sheffield. England 
Parry, Ronald J., 1978. Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. (1964) Occidental College; Ph.D. (1968) Brandeis University 
Parsons, Spencer W., 1969. Associate Professor of Architecture 

B.A. (1953) University of Michigan; M.Arch. (1963) Harvard University ^* 

Paslay, Paul R., 1991. Adjunct Professor in Mechanical Engineering and 
Materials Science 

B.S. (1950) Louisiana State University; M.S. (1952) Rice University; Sc.D. (1955) 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Patten, Robert L., 1969. Professor of English 

B.A. (1960) Swarthmore College; M.A. (1962), Ph.D. (1965) Princeton University 
Peaceman, Donald W., 1983. Adjunct Professor of Computational and Applied Math- 
ematics j^« 
" B.Ch.E. (1947) College of the City of New York; Sc.D. (1952) Massachusetts Institute of' 

Technology 
Pearson, James Boyd, Jr., 1965. J.S. Abercrombie Professor in the Department of 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S.E.E. ( 1 958). M.S.E.E. (1959) University of Arkansas; Ph.D. (1962) Purdue University 
Perez, J. Bernardo, 1 979. Associate Professor of Spanish and Associate of Sid Richardson 

College 

Licenciatura (1972) Universidad de Granada, Spain; M.A. (1974). Ph.D. (1982) Univer- 
sity of Iowa 
Perry, John, 1983. Artist Teacher, Piano 

B.Mus. (1956). M.Mus. (1957) Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester 
Peters, Albert W., 1983. Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences 
Pfeiffer, Paul E., 1947. Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics and 
,^ ... Associate of Brown College 

B.S.E.E. (1938) Rice Institute; B.D. (1943) Southern Methodist University; M.S.E.E. 

(1948). Ph.D. (1952) Rice Institute 
Pharr, George M., 1980. Professor of Materials Science and Master of Wiess College 

B.S.M.E. (1975) Rice University; M.S.M.S. (1977). Ph.D. (1979) Stanford University 



- .,...^.^J 

Phenix, Linda G., 1981 . Instructor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 2^' 

B.F.A. (1977) University of Texas; M.A. (1978) Sam Houston State University 
Phillips, Jr., George N., 1987. Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1974). Ph.D. ( 1976) Rice University onr,'G^ 

Philpott, Charles William, 1964. Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and 

Master of Wiess College 

B. A. (1957), M.S. (1958) Texas Technological College; Ph.D. (1962) Tulane University 
Pier, Stanley M., 1974. Adjunct Associate Professor of Environmental Science 

B.S. (1948) Brooklyn College; Ph.D. (12952) Purdue University * ■^^""'' 

Piper, William Bowman, 1969. Professor of English B.A. (1951) Harvard University; 

M.A. (1952) Columbia University; Ph.D. (1958) University of Wisconsin 
Poindexter, Hally Beth W., 1965. Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

and Associate of Jones College 

B.A. ( 1947) Rice Institute; B.S. (1949) University of Houston; M.A. (1950) University of 

Northern Colorado; Ed.D. (1957) Columbia University 
Polanyi, Livia, 1988. Associate Professor of Linguistics and Semiotics 

B.A. (1969) Goddard College; M.A. (1975). Ph.D. (1978) University of Michigan 
Polking, John C, 1968. Professor of Mathematics and Associate of Baker College 

B.S. ( 1956) University of Notre Dame; M.S. ( 1961 ), Ph.D.. (1966) University of Chicago 
Pomerantz, James R., 1988. Elma W. Schneider Professor of Psychology, Dean of the 

School of Social Sciences and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (1968) University of Michigan; Ph.D. (1974) Yale University ,^. • , ..^ 
Pope, Albert H., 1986. Associate Professor of Architecture '" ■ -- - ' 

B.Arch. (1978) Southern California Institute of Architecture; M.Arch. (1986) Princeton 

University 
Poulos, Basilios N., 1975. Professor of Art and Associate of Brown College -'•". 

B.F.A. (1965) Atlanta School of Art; M.F.A. (1968) Tulane University ^^m^^i 

Pyung-Soo, Kim, 1981 . Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences ^('"^ 

B.A. (1963) Han Kuk University. Korea 
Queller, David C, 1989. Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology "'' ' 

B.A.(1976)UniversityofIllinois;M.S.(1978). Ph.D. (1982) University of Michigan 
Quillen, Carol E., 1989. Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. (1983) University of Chicago; Ph.D. ( 1991) Princeton University "•■"^'^' 
Quiocho, Florante A., 1972. Adjunct Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. ( 1959) Central Philippine University; M.S. ( 1961 ) Howard University; Ph.D. (1966) 

Yale University 
Rabson, Thomas Avelyn, 1959. Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering ■ '**' 

B.A. (1954), B.S.E.E. (1955), M.A. (1957), Ph.D. (1959) Rice Institute 
Rachleff, Larry, 1991. Associate Professor of Conducting 

B.S. (1977) University of Connecticut; M.M. (1979) University of Michigan ''^ '^''"^ 
Ramaswamy, Balasubramaniam, 1989. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

and Materials Science 

B.S. (1980) Universitv of Madras; M.S. (1982) Indian Institute of Technology; Ph.D. 

( 1987) Chuo University 
Rankine, Graeme, 1990. Assistant Professor of Accounting and Associate of Brown 

College 

B.Ec. (1975) Australian National University; Ph.D. (1987) University of Washington 
Rau, Carl, 1983. Professor of Physics 

Diplom-Physiker (1967), Dr.rer.nat. (1970) Technical University, Munich, Germany 



42 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Rau, Hsiu-hua, 1992. Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. (1977), M.A. (1979) National Taiwan University; M.A. (1984), M.Ph. (1989), Ph.D. 

(1992) Yale University 
Raymond, Richard L., 1986. Adjunct Professor of Environmental Science 

B.S. (1947), M.S. (1951) University of Illinois 
Rea, Joan, 1968. Associate Professor of Spanish and Portuguese 

B.A. (1954) New York University; M.A. (1964) University of Houston; Ph.D. (1970) 

University of Texas 
Reiff, Patricia H., 1992. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1971) Oklahoma State University; M.S. (1974), Ph.D. (1975) Rice University 
Reiner, Martin A., 1985. Lecturer on Architecture 
_ . B.A. ( 1966) City College of City University of New York; M.P.A. (1968) Ph.D. ( 1973) 

Maxwell School, Syracuse University 
Reiser, Stanley J., 1983. Adjunct Professor of Religious Studies 

A.B. (1959) Columbia University; M.D. (1963) State University of New York Downstate 

Medical Center; M.P.A. (1966) John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard 

University; Ph.D. (1970) Harvard University 
Reuben, Jeffrey D., 1988. AdjunctAssistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering and 

Materials Science 

B.S.M.E. (1973) Lehigh University; M.D., Ph.D. (1973-1981) Case-Western Reserve 

University 
Riese, W.C. Rusty, 1985. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S.(1973)NewMexicoInstituteofMiningandTechnology;M.S. (1977), Ph.D. (1980) 

University of New Mexico 
Risser, William L., 1988. AdjunctProfessor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.A. (1960) Harvard College; M.A. (1968) Harvard University; M.D. (1972) Yale 

Medical School '^" ' 

Robert, Mark A. 1984. Professor of Chemical Engineering 

Dip. (1975) Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich; Ph.D. (1980) Swiss Federal 

Institute of Technology, Lausanne 
Roberts, Jabus B., Jr., 1975. Professor of Physics li < 

B.A. (1965) Columbia University; Ph.D. (1969) University of Pennsylvania 
Rodarte, Joseph R., 1990. Adjunct Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Materials 

Science 

B.A. (1960) Rice Institute; M.D. (1964) Harvard Medical School u^ 

Roediger, Henry L., 1988. Lynette S. Autrey Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (1969) Washington & Lee University; Ph.D. (1973) Yale University 
Rorschach, Harold E., 1952. Sam and Helen Worden Professor of Physics and Associate 

of Will Rice College 

S.B. (1949), S.M. (1950), Ph.D. (1952) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Rose, Beatrice S., 1977. Lecturer on Music, Harp 
Ross, David, HI, 1979. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.A. (1962) Yale University; M.B.A. (1970) Harvard University 
Roux, Robert, 1990. Associate Professor of Piano and Chairperson, Keyboard 

B.Mus. ( 1970) Loyola University; M.Mus. (1978), D.M.A. (1980) University of Texas at 

Austin 
Rudolph, Frederick B., 1972. Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1966) University of Missouri; Ph.D. (1971) Iowa State University 
Rupp, George, 1985. President and Professor of Religious Studies 

A.B. (1964) Princeton University; B.D. (1967) Yale University; Ph.D. (1972) Harvard 

University 



^qAT?ni/A'/ioiTAHT2lv^-IMaA m, 

Samuels, Danny M., 1981. Visiting Professor of Architecture -'■ l'''Of s-^ntijl, .,>^slbr'. 

B.Arch. (1971) Rice University 
San, Ka-Yiu, 1984. Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (1978) Rice; Ph.D. (1984) California Institute of Technology ^'•'^ 

Sanborn, Hugh W., 1973. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Religious Studies 

A.B. (1962) Muhlenberg College; B.D. (1967) Andover Newton Theological Seminary; 

Ph.D. (1975) University of Iowa 
Sanborn, Robert D., 1989. Lecturer on Humanities ■'? 

B.A. (1980) Florida Slate University; M.S. (1985) Northern Illinois University 
Sanders, Paula, 1987. Associate Professor of History 

B.A. (1977) Northwestern University; M.A. (1981), Ph.D. (1984) Princeton University 
Sass, Ronald L., 1958. Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Chemistry, 

Honorary Associate of Hanszen College, and Associate of Jones College 

A.B. (1954) Augustana College; Ph.D. (1957) University of Southern California 
Sauerbrey, Roland, 1985. Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Dip. (1978); Ph.D. (1981) University Wuerzburg, West Germany i..;'; ■■ 
Savit, Carl H., 1988. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1942), M.S. (1943) California Institute of Technology vyi'tti^ 

Sawyer, Dale S., 1988. Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1976) Purdue University; Ph.D. (1982) M.I.T. 
Schaezler, Donald J., 1979. Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Environ- 
mental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering 

B.A. (1966), B.S. (1967). Ph.D. (1970) Rice University ^^ 

Schaffer, Alejandro A., 1988. Assistant Professor in Computer Science .^"^iMoic 

B.S. (1983), M.S. (1983) Carnegie-Mellon; Ph.D. (1988) Stanford University ' ^ 
Schneider, David J., 1989. Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (1962) Wabash College; Ph.D. (1966) Stanford University ''"^' 

Schnoebelen, Anne, 1974. Joseph and Ida Kirkland Mullen Professor of Music 

B.A. (1958) Rosary College; M.Mus. (1960), Ph.D. (1966) University of Illinois . 
Schreiber, Janet M., 1 976. Adjunct Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. ( 1 968) University of California, Los Angeles; M.A. (1970), Ph.D. ( 1 973) University 

of California. Berkeley 
Schroepfer, George J., Jr., 1972. Ralph and Dorothy Looney Professor of Biochemistry 

and Cell Biology and Chemistry 

B.S. (1955), M.D. (1957). Ph.D. (1961) University of Minnesota T.-^ -(.«>* ,5^BiS«i 
Schuler, Douglas A., 1992. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. (1985) University of California-Berkeley; Ph.D. (1992) University of Minnesota 
Scott, David W., 1979. Professor of Statistics i^Fumiiuti^^r. (r.y. , , ,^.ti 

B.A. (1972), M.A.. Ph.D. (1976) Rice University -""1 ,.3 bfidoi^' Sj.nibf.wM 

Scuseria, Gustavo E., 1989. Assistant Professor of Chemistry -^'^/inlJ (£^P' ) .? 1 

M.S. (1979), Ph.D. ( 1983) University of Buenos Aires •■•.-- -' ./siJEmfi 

Sears, David A., 1983. Adjunct Professor in Biomedical Engineering '^''^ 

B.S. (1953) Yale University; M.S. (1958), M.D. (1959) University of Portland Medical 

School 
Sedlak, John M., 1990. Lecturer in Civil Engineering 

B.A. (1973). M.S. (1974) Pennsylvania State University- •'• • >^ '«^'- 

Seed, Patricia, 1982. Associate Professor of History loneiH n^? rQ^i 

B.A. (1971) Fordham University; M.A. (1975) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1980) 

University of Wisconsin 



44 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Sellers, James, 1971. David Rice Professor of Ethics ^' '**^' *' ^rnrH '-^•■t:' 

B.E.E. (1947) Georgia Institute of Technology; M.S. (1952) Florida State University; 

Ph.D. (1958) Vanderbilt University 
Semmes, Stephen W., 1987. Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (1980) Armstrong State College; Ph.D. (1983) Washington University 
Shaddix, Mallory Campbell, 1991. Lecturer on Administrative Science 

B.A. (1972); M.B.A. (1975) University of Texas at Austin 
Shank, C. Dean, Jr. 1984. Artist Teacher of Secondary Piano and Piano Technology 

B.Mus. (1968), M.Mus. (1971) North Texas State University 
Shanks, Jacqueline V., 1988. Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (1983) Iowa State University; Ph.D. (1989) California Institute of Technology 
Sher, George, 1991. Herbert S. Autrey Professor of (Humanities) Philosophy 

B.A. (1964) Brandeis University; Ph.D. (1972) Columbia University 
Sherman, Daniel J., 1990. Assistant Professor of French and History 

A.B. (1980) Harvard University; M.A. (1981), Ph.D. (1985) Yale University 
Sherman, William H., 1986. Associate Professor of Architecture 

A.B. (1977) Princeton University; M.Arch. (1982) Yale University 
Shirley, Dennis L., 1988. Associate Professor of Education and Master of Will Rice 

College 

B. A. ( 1 977) University of Virginia; M.A. (1981) New School for Social Research; Ed.D. 

(1988) Harvard University 
Shockley, Richard L., Jr., 1992. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. (1984) University of Virginia; Ph.D. (1992) University of Indiana 
Sickles, Robin, 1985. Professor of Economics and Statistics 

B.S. (1972) Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D. (1976) University of North Carolina, 

Chapel Hill 
Silverstein, Gordon, 1992. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science and Political 

Science 

B.A. (1981) Cornell University; Ph.D. (1991) Harvard University 
Sinclair, James B., 1978. Associate Professor of Computer Science in the Department of 

Computer and Electrical Engineering and Associate of Brown College 

B.S.E.E. (1973), M.E.E. (1974), Ph.D. (1979) Rice University 
Sisson, Virginia B., 1 992 Assistant Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

A.B. (1979) BrynMawr: M.A. (1981); Ph.D. (1985) Princeton University 
Skaggs, Ray H., 1972. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.A. (1942) Rice Institute; M.D. (1945) University of Texas 
Skura, Meredith, 1978. Professor of English 

B.A. (1965) Swarthmore College; Ph.D. (1971) Yale University 
Smayling, Michael C, 1989. Lecturer on Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S. (1972) University of Minnesota; M.S. (1975), Ph.D. (1981) Rice University 
Smalley, Richard E., 1976. Norman and Gene Hackerman Professor of Chemistry and 

Professor of Physics 

B.S. (1965) University of Michigan; M.A. (1971), Ph.D. (1973) Princeton University 
Smith, David P., 1982. Adjunct Professor of Sociology 

B.A. (1962) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1979) Harvard University 
Smith, George, 1981. Associate Professor of Art 

B.F.A. (1969) San Francisco Art Institute; M.A. (1972) Hunter College 
Smith, Gordon W., 1968. Professor of Economics 

A.B. (1956) Washington University; Ph.D. (1966) Harvard University 



Smith, Ken A., 1975. Distinguished Faculty Fellow in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.A. (1970), M.S. (1973), Ph.D. (1975) Rice University 
Smith, Richard J., 1973. Professor of History and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1965), M.A. (1968). Ph.D. (1972) University of California, Davis '^''^ 

Snow, Edward A., 1981. Professor of English and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1964) Rice University; M.A. (1966) University of California, Riverside; Ph.D. 

(1969) State University of New York, Buffalo 
Soligo, Ronald, 1967. Professor of Economics and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A. (1958) University of British Columbia, Canada; Ph.D. (1964) Yale University 
Sorensen, Danny C, 1989. Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics 

B.S. (1972) University of California, Davis; M.A. (1975). Ph.D. (1977) University of 
California, San Diego 
Spanos, Pol D., 1984. Lewis B. Ryon I*rofessor of Mechanical Engineering and Civil 
Engineering 

Dip. (1973) National Technical University (Greece); M.S. ( 1 974 ); Ph.D. ( 1 976) California 

Institute of Technology 
Sparagana, John, 1 989. Assistant Professor of Art 

B.G.S. (1980) University of Michigan; M.F.A. (1987) Stanford University " .- - : 
Spence, Dale W., 1963. Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. (1956) Rice Institute; M.S. (1959) North Texas State University; Ed.D. (1966) 
Louisiana State University ,, . , ,^l> : a 

Starr, Edith, 1992. G.C. Evans Instructor of Mathematics' 'n.'i 

B.S. (1986) Harvard University; Ph.D. (1992) University of California-Berkeley 

Stebbings, Ronald F., 1968. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy and of Physics, 
Vice-President for Student Affairs and Associate of Jones College 
B.Sc. (1952), Ph.D. (1956) University College, London, England 

Stein, Robert M., 1979. Associate Professor of Political Science and Associate of Jones 
College 

B.A. (1972) Ohio Wesleyan University; M.A. (1974). Ph.D. (1977) University of 

Wisconsin at Milwaukee 
Stern, Michael, 1991. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1978) Stanford University; Ph.D. (1985) University of California. San Francisco 
Stevenson, Paul M., 1 984. Associate Professor of Physics and Associate of Brown College 

B.A. ( 1976) Cambridge; Ph.D. (1979) Imperial College, London 
Stewart, Charles R., 1969. Professor of Biochemistry and Cell Biology and Associate of 

Jones College 

B.S. (1962) University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. (1967) Stanford University „,.l i.^-'l 
Stice, Earl K., 1990. Assistant Professor of Accounting 

B.S. ( 1981 ). M.A. ( 1982) Brigham Young University; M.S. (1986). Ph.D. (1988) Cornell 

University 
Stokes, Gale, 1968. Professor of History ~ 

B.A. (1954) Colgate University; M.A. (1965), Ph.D. ( 1970) Indiana University 
Stoll, Richard J., 1979. Professor of Political Science and Associate of Jones College 

A.B. (1974) University of Rochester; Ph.D. (1979) University of Michigan 
Stormer, John C, Jr., 1983. Croneis Professor of Geology 

A.B. (1963) Dartmouth College; Ph.D. ( 1971 ) University of California. Berkeley " . ^ 
Strassmann, Joan E., 1980. Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 

and Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. (1974) University of Michigan; Ph.D. (1979) University of Texas 



46 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Stroup, John M., 1988. Harry and Hazel Chavanne Professor of Religious Studies 

A.B. ( 1968) Washington University; M.Div. (1972) Concordia Seminary; M.Phil. (1975), 

Ph.D. (1980) Yale University 
Subtelny, Stephen, 1968. Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Associate 

of Brown College 

B.A. (1949) Hobart College; M.A. (1952), Ph.D. (1955) University of Missouri 
Sullivan, Sonja Rebecca, 1990. Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

A.B. (1981) Dartmouth College; M.A. (1985), Ph.D. (1991) Yale University 
Sutton, Neal S., 1989. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.A. (1969), J.D. (1972) University of Houston 
Swint, John Michael, 1977. Adjunct Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A. ( 1968) California State University at Humboldt; M.A., Ph.D. ( 1 972) Rice University 
Symes, William W., 1984. Professor of Computational and Applied Mathematics 

B.A. ( 197 1 ) University of California at Berkeley; M.A.. Ph.D. (1975) Harvard University 
Talwani, Manik, 1985. Schlumberger Professor of Geophysics 

B.Sc.Hons. (1951). M.Sc.(1953) Delhi University; Ph.D. (1959) Ci)lumbia University; 

Ph.D. (Honoris Causa) (1981)Oslo University 
Taner, M. Turhan, 1988. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

M.S. (1950) Technical University of Istanbul 
Tapia, Richard A., 1970. Noah Harding Professor of Applied Mathematics 

B.A. (1961), M.A. (1966), Ph.D. (1967) University of California, Los Angeles 
Taylor, Julie M., 1981. Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. (1966) Harvard University; Diploma (1969), Ph.D. (1973) Oxford University 
Taylor, Ronald N., 1983. George R. Brown Professor of Administration, Professor of 

Psychology and Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1960) Westminster College; M.A. (1964) University of Nebraska; Ph.D. (1970) 

University of University of Minnesota 
Taylor, William M., 1988. Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. (1961), M.S. (1962), Ph.D. (1979) University of Chicago 
Temkin, Larry S., 1980. Associate Professor of Philosophy and Associate of Jones 

College 

B.A. (1975) University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. (1981) Princeton University 
Thames, Howard D., Jr., 1975. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A. (1963), Ph.D. (1970) Rice University 
Thomas, David Q., 1 990. Assistant Professor of Human Performance and Health Sciences 

B.S. (1980) Pennsylvania State University; M.S. (1982), Ph.D. (1985) Arizona State 

University 
Thompson, Ewa M., 1970. Professor of Slavic Studies 

B.A. (1963) University of Warsaw, Poland; M.F.A. (1963)SopotConservatory of Music, 

Poland; Ph.D. (1967) Vanderbilt University 
Thompson, James R., 1970. Professor of Statistics and Associate of Lovett College 

B.Eng. (1960) Vanderbilt University; M.A. (1963), Ph.D. (1965) Princeton University 
Tittel, Frank K., 1 967. J.S. Abercrombie Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineer- 
ing and Associate of Hanszen College 

B.A. (1955), M.A., Ph.D. (1959) Oxford University, England 
Tobin, Mary L., 1979. Lecturer on English 

B.A. (1963) Carleton College; M.A. (1966) Columbia University; Ph.D. (1973) Rice 

University 



47 

Tomson, Mason B., 1977. Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering 

B.S. (1967) Southwestern State College; Ph.D. ( 1972) Oklahoma State University ^J'' 
Torczon, Linda M.,1985. Faculty Fellow in Computer Science and Associate of Brown 

College 

B.S. (1980). M.S. (1984), Ph.D. (1985) Rice University : '\ .^r.f» T' in^T^.o-N- / 
Trammell, George T., 1961 . Professor of Physics -^' "-■' "' 

B.A. (1944) Rice Institute: Ph.D. (1950) Cornell University •■»' m?^ ' ■<!: 1 

Traweek, Sharon, 1987. Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A. (1964) University of California at Berkeley; M.A. (1966) California State Univer- 
sity; Ph.D. ( 1982) University of California at Santa Cruz 
Trepel, Shirley, 1975. Professor of Music 

B.Mus. (1945) Curtis Institute of Music 
Tsuchitani, Chiyeko, 1986. Adjunct Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.A. ( 1961 ) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. (1966) University of Louisville 
Tyler, Stephen A., 1970. Herbert S. Autrey Professor of Anthropology and Linguistics 

B.A. (1957) Simpson College; M.A. (1962). Ph.D. (1964) Stanford University 
Udden, Mark M., 1983. Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Biomedical Engineering 

Laboratory 

M.A., S.B. (1973) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.D. (1977) Southwestern 

Medical School, University of Texas, Dallas 
Uecker, Wilfred C, 1984. Harmon Whittington Professor of Accounting, Associate Dean 

for Academic Affairs of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration, and 

Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1968), M.B.A. (1970), Ph.D. (1973) University of Texas at Austin 
Urrutibeheity, Hector N., 1967. Associate Professor of Spanish and Linguistics 

Profesorado (1956) La Plata National University, Argentina; Ph.D. (1968) Stanford 

University 
Vail, Peter R., 1986. W. Maurice Ewing Professor of Oceanography 

A.B. (1952) Dartmouth College; M.S. (1953), Ph.D. (1959) Northwestern University 
Valenzuela, Angela, 1990. Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.A. ( 198 1 ) San Angelo State University; M.A. (1983) University of Texas, Austin; M.A. 

(1985), Ph.D. (1990) Stanford University 
Vandaveer, Vicki V., 1989. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology bi.nj^n f- ., ff 

B.A. (1975), M.A. (1981), Ph.D. ( 1981) University of Houston 
Vandenberg, Kristy, 1989. Lecturer on Human Performance and Health Sciences u ' 

B.S. University of Michigan <! ji>i 

Van Helden, Albert, 1970. Lynette S. Autrey Professor of History 

B.Eng. (1962), M.S. (1964) Stevens Institute of Technology; M.A. (1967) University of 

Michigan; Ph.D. (1970) London University. England 
Varman, Peter J. 1983. Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.Tech. (1978) Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur; M.S.E.E. (1980); Ph.D. (1983) 

University of Texas, Austin 
Vella, Francis G. M., 1990. Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.A. (1983) University of Sydney; M.A. (1985) Australian National University; Ph.D. 

( 1990) University of Rochester 
Veech, William A., 1969. Milton B. Porter Professor of Mathematics 

A.B. (1960) Dartmouth College; Ph.D. (1963) Princeton University 
Veletsos, Anestis S., 1964. Brown and Root Professor. Department of Civil Engineering 

B.S. (1948) Robert College, Turkey; M.S. (1950), Ph.D. (1953) University of Illinois 



48 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

VerMuelen,Williaiii., 1990. Artist Teacher of Horn ^^ ' ■ " --^-rr.. t 

Viebig, V. Richard, Jr., 1969. Lecturer on Accounting 

B.A. (1962), Master of Accounting (1977) Rice University 
Visser, Pieter A., 1979. Adjunct Lecturer on Music 
Voigt, Gerd-Hannes, 1 980. Distinguished Faculty Fellow in the Center for Space Physics 

and Astronomy 

Deploma of Physics and Geophysics (1970), Ph.D. (1975)University of Braunshweig, 

Germany 
von der Mehden, Fred R., 1 968. Albert Thomas Professor of Political Science, Professor 

of Administrative Science and Associate of Wiess College 

B.A. (1948) University of the Pacific; M.A. (1950) Claremont Graduate School; Ph.D. 

(1957) University of California, Berkeley 
Waldman, Peter D., 1981. Professor of Architecture 

B.A. ( 1965), M.F.A. ( 1967) Princeton University 
Walker, Ian D., 1989. Assistant Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering and 

Associate of Jones College 

B.S. ( 1983) University of Hull, England; M.S. (1985), Ph.D.. (1989) University of Texas 
Wallace, Kristine Gilmartin, 1966. Associate Professor of Classics 

B.A. (1963) Bryn Mawr College; M.A.(1965), Ph.D. (1967) Stanford 
Wallace, Stephen, 1990. Adjunct Professor of Linguistics and Semiotics 

B.A. (1968) Rice University; M.A. (1974), Ph.D. (1976) Cornell University 
Walters, G. King, 1963. Professor of Physics and of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.A. (1953) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1956) Duke University 
Wamble, Mark, 1991. Assistant Professor of Architecture 

B.S. (1983) Texas A&M University; M.A. (1988) Harvard University 
Wang, Chao-Cheng, 1 968. Noah Harding Professor of Applied Mathematics and Profes- 
sor of Mechanical Engineering 

B.S. (1959) National Taiwan University; Ph.D. (1965) Johns Hopkins University 
Ward, Calvin H., 1 966. Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and 
Environmental Science 

B.S. ( 1955) New Mexico State University; M.S. (1958), Ph.D. (1960) Cornell University; 

M.P.H. ( 1978) University of Texas School of Public Health 
Ward, Daniel S., 1990. Assistant Professor of Political Science 

B.A. (1984) Purdue University; M.A. (1986). Ph.D. (1989) New York University 
Warren, Joe D., 1 986. Associate Professor of Computer Science and Associate of Sid 

Richardson College 

B.A. (1983), M.S. (1985) Rice University; Ph.D. (1986) Cornell University 
Warren, Scott K., 1979. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Computer Science 

B.A. (1972), M.A. (1974), Ph.D. (1976) Rice University 
Waters, David L., 1976. Artist Teacher of Trombone 

B.M.E. (1962) University of Houston; M.Mus. (1964) University of Texas 
Watkins, Michael J., 1980. Professor of Psychology 

B.Sc. (1965, 1969), Ph.D. (1972) University of London, England 
Wedemeyer, Phil D., 1990. Adjunct Associate Professor of Accounting 

B.B.A. (1971) Baylor University 
Weinberg, Armin D., 1980. Adjunct Professor of Human Performance and Health 

Sciences 

B.A. (1966), Ph.D. (1971) Ohio State 



"'^ *-T"^ ^'^ - '^'^n\Aj=(T2i{/[iMaA ^ 

Weisheit, Jon C, 1988. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy ' ' ^- -^^nf 

B.S. (1966) University of Texas-El Paso; M.S. (1969) Ph.D. (1970) Rice University 

Weisman, R. Bruce, 1979. Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.A. (1971) Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D. (1977) 

Weissenberger, Klaus H.M., 197 1 . Professor of German and Associate of Sid Richardson 
College 

B.A. (1959), M.A. (1965) University of Hamburg, Germany; Ph.D. (1967) University of 

Southern California 
Wells, Raymond O., Jr., 1965. Professor of Mathematics and Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1962) Rice University; M.S. (1964), Ph.D. (1965) New York University 
Wendt, Richard Ernest, 1991 . Lecturer on Electrical and Computer Engineering '''«"'' 

A.B. (1976), M.B.A. (1977) University of Chicago; M.S. (1980), Ph.D. (1982) Rice 

University 
Westbrook, Robert A., 1989. William Alexander Kirkland Professor of Administration 

A.B. (1969), M.B.A. (1971), Ph.D. (1975) University of Michigan 
Westheimer, Alan D., 1983. Lecturer on Accounting -^ '^ 

B.S.E. (1965) University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A. (1966) University of California, 
' Berkeley 
Wheeler, Mary Fanett, 1974. Noah Harding Professor of Applied Mathematics 

B.A., B.S. (1960), M.A. (1963) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1971) Rice University 
White, Frank S., 1982. Lecturer on Architecmre : 1 uo ■ ,nnA 'a-vj .itamsL ji.-f < 

B.S. (1977) Rochester Institute of Technology '-^^,ailA.t 

White, Robert A., 1981. Adjunct Associate Professor of Statistics '^^3 .M'^jiuH 

B.A. (1966) New Mexico State University; Ph.D. (1970) University of Chicago 
Whitmire, Kathryn J., 1992. Tsanoff Lecturer on Public Affairs and Director of the Rice 

Institute for Policy Analysis 

B.B.A. (1968), M.S. (1970) University of Houston 
Whitmire, Kenton H., 1982. Associate Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Brown 

College .^ g 

B.S. (1977) Roanoke College; Ph.D. (1982) Northwestern University 
Widrig, Walter M., 1969. Associate Professor of Art History 

B.A. ( 1951) Yale University; M.A. (1956) Columbia University; Ph.D. (1975) New York 

University ' ' 

Wiener, Martin J., 1967. Mary Gibbs Jones Professor of History .^ 

B.A. (1962) Brandeis University; M.A. (1963), Ph.D. (1967) Harvard University ''^^^ 
Wiesner, Mark R., 1988. Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering 

B.A. (1978) Coe College; M.S. (1980) University of Iowa; Ph.D. (1985) The Johns 
Hopkins University --- 

Wilford, Michael, 1978. Visiting Professor of Architecmre 

Honors Diploma ( 1 960) Northern Polytechnic School of Architecture, England; Diploma 
( 1967) Regent Street Polytechnic Planning School 
Wilkinson, Harry E., 1990. Visiting Professor of Administrative Science 

B.A. ( 1 952) Princeton University; M.B.A. ( 1 957) Washington University; D.B.A. (1960) 
Harvard University 
Williams, Donald L., 1988. Adjunct Associate Professor of Administrative Science 

B.S. ( 1957) University of Kentucky; B.Arch. (1962) University of Illinois at Champaign/ 
Urbana; M.S. (1971) University of Louisville 
Williams, Edward E., 1978. Henry Gardiner Symonds Professor of Administrative 
Science and Associate of Richardson College ^[^Y 

B.S. (1966) University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. (1968) University of Texas 



50 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Wilson, James L., 1966. Adjunct Professor of Geology and Geophysics ^^ ;•'.:< 
B.A. (1942), M.A. (1944) University of Texas; Ph.D. (1949) Yale University 

Wilson, John T., 1980. Adjunct Associate Professor of Environmental Science and 
Engineering 

B.S. (1969) Baylor University; M.A. (1971) University of California, Berkeley; Ph.D. 

(1978) Cornell University 
Wilson, Joseph B., 1954. Professor of German 

B.A. (1950), M.A. (1953) Rice Institute; Ph.D. (1960) Stanford University 
Wilson, Lon J., 1973. Professor of Chemistry and Associate of Richardson College 

B.A. (1966) Iowa State University; Ph.D. (1971) 
Wilson, Richard L., 1985. Associate Professor of Art History and Associate of Hanszen 

College 

B.A. (1981) Franklin and Marshall College; M.A. (1981), Ph.D. (1985) University of 
Kansas 

Wilson, Rick K., 1983. Associate Professor of Political Science and Statistics and 

Associate of Sid Richardson College 

B.A. (1975), M.A. (1977) Creighton University; Ph.D. (1982) Indiana University 
Wilson, William L. Jr., 1972. Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and 

Resident Associate of Wiess College 

B.S. (1965), M.S. (1966), Ph.D. (1972) Cornell University 
Wilt, James, 1990. Artist Teacher, Trumpet 

B.Mus. (1984) University of Cincinnati; M.Mus (1990) Eastman School of Music 
Wincenc, Carol, 1990. Visiting Professor of Flute 

Diplomas of Honor (1966 and 1977) Accademiadi Santa Cecila (Italy); Diploma (1968) 
Chigiana Conservatory (Italy); B.Mus. (1971) Manhattan School of Music; M.Mus. 
(1972) Juilliard School of Music 

Windsor, Duane, 1977. Lynette S. Autrey Professor of Management, Associate Dean for 

Student Affairs of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration, and 

Associate of Will Rice College 

B.A. (1969) Rice University; A.M. (1973), Ph.D. (1978) Harvard University 
Winkler, Kathleen, 1992. Associate Professor of Violin 

B.Mus. (1972) Indiana University; M.Mus. (1974) University of Michigan 
Winkler, Michael, 1967. Professor of German and Associate of Richardson College 

B.A. (1961) St. Benedict's College; M.A. (1963), Ph.D. (1966) University of Colorado 
Winningham, Geoffrey L., 1969. Professor of Art and Honorary Associate of Wiess 

College 

B.A. (1965) Rice University; M.S. (1968) Illinois Institute of Technology 
Wittenberg, Gordon G., Jr., 1979. Associate Professor of Architecture and Master of 

Richardson College 

B.F.A. (1968) Trinity College, Connecticut; M.Arch. (1972) Washington University 
Wolf, Michael, 1988. Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. (1981) Yale University; Ph.D. (1986) Stanford University 
Wolf, Richard A., 1967. Professor of Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.Eng.Phys. (1962) Cornell University: Ph.D. (1966) California Institute of Technology 
Wolin, Richard, 1984. Professor of History 

B.A. (1974) Reed College; M.A. (1976), Ph.D. (1980) York University 

Wood, Philip R., 1990. Associate Professor of French 

B.A. (1974) University of Cape Town; M.A. (1980) University of York; Ph.D. (1988) 
Yale University 



1HAT8 QMA HOITA5IT2r/IIMaA SI 

Wood, Susan, 1981. Professor of English and Master of Lovett College 

B.A. (1968) East Texas State University; M.A. (1970) University of Texas. Arlington 

Wright, Anthony A., 1980. Adjunct Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A. (1965) Stanford University; M.A. (1970), Ph.D. (1971) Columbia University 

Wright, James E., 1989. Associate Professor of Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1971) Clemson University; M.S. (1974) Virginia Polytechnic Institute; Ph.D. 
- ( 1980) University of California 
Wu, Kenneth K. 1984. Adjunct Professor in the Biomedical Engineering Laboratory 

M.D. (1966) National Taiwan University; M.S. (1968) Yale 
Wunder, R. Stephen, 1984. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Psychology .,^fi/ ? .r'pfT 

B.A. (1970) Creighton University. M.A. (1976), Ph.D. (1979) Wayne State University 
Wyschogrod, Edith, 1992. J. Newton Rayzor Professor of Philosophy and Religious 

Thought 

A.B. (1957) Hunter College; Ph.D. (1970) Columbia University 
Yamal, Ricardo, 1986. Associate Professor of Spanish and Associate of Jones College 

B.A. (1979) Universidad Catolica. Chile; M.A. (1978). Ph.D. (1982) University of 

Pittsburgh 
Yatsu, Frank M., 1984. Adjunct Professor in the Biomedical Engineering Laboratory 

A.B. (1955) Brown University; M.D. (1959) Case-Western Reserve University 
Yi, Kei-Mu, 1990. Assistant Professor of Economics 

B.S. (1983) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A. (1985). Ph.D. (1989) University 

ofChicago 
Yim, Bennett C.K., 1989. Assistant Professor of Administrative Science 

B.B.A. (1983) Chinese University of Hong Kong; Ph.D. (1989) Purdue University '^ ' 

Young, James F., 1990. Associate Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.S. (1965). M.S. (1966) Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D. (1970) Stanford 
University 

Yunis, Harvey E., 1987. Associate Professor of Ancient Studies 

B.A. (1978) Dartmouth College; B.A. (1982) M.A. (1985) University of Cambridge: 
Ph.D. (1987) Harvard University 
Zeff, Stephen A., 1978. Herbert S. Autrey Professor of Accounting and Executive 
Associate of Richardson College 

B.S. ( 1955 ). M.S. ( 1957 ) University of Colorado; M.B.A. (1960). Ph.D. ( 1962) University 
of Michigan: Dr. Econ. ( 1990) Turku School of Economics and Business Administration. 
Finland (hon.) 

Zhang, Jian-nan, 1991. Adjunct Lecturer on Linguistics and Semiotics 

B.A. (1978) Shandong University, China; M.A. ( 1986) Beijing University; Ph.D. (1991) 

Rice University .DU«..J,un^ 

Zimmerman, Stuart D., 1971. Adjunct Professor of Statistics 

B.A. ( 1955), Ph.D. (1961) University of Chicago 
Zodrow, George, 1979. Professor of Economics and Associate of Lovett College 

B.A., M.M.E. (1973) Rice University: M.A. (1977) Ph.D. (1980) Princeton University 
Zwaenepoel, Willy E., 1984. Associate Professor of Computer Science and Associate of 

Lovett College 

B.S. (1979) Ghent, Belgium; M.S. (1980), Ph.D. (1984) Stanford 
Zygourakis, Kyriacos, 1980. Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering and 

Associate of Jones College 

Diploma ofChemical Engineering (1975) National Technical University of Athens; Ph.D. 
(1981) University of Minnesota 

B.i>. (1V82; Bc-'o,-> College. MS : IV^r t^li ;> ( .•}>,[)) K/..' <- ivl-t,.;v 



52 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Professional Research Staff 

Alford, John M., 1991. Research Associate in Chemistry 
B.S. (1985); M.S. (1989); Ph.D. (1990) Rice University 
Armilli, Murty, 1990. Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. (1978) Andhra University, India; M.S. ( 1 98 1 ) University of Roorkee, India; M. Phil. 

(1982), Ph.D. (1988) University of Hyderabad, India 
Balshaw-Biddle, Katherine, 1990. Research Associate in Environmental Science and 

Engineering 

B.S. (1974); M.S. (1977) Michigan State University; Ph.D. (1981) Rice University 
Barnes, Marguerite Johnston, 1986. Complimentary Research Associate in History 

A.B. (1938) Birmingham Southern College 
Bartos, Milan, 1991. Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

M.S. (1985); Ph.D. (1989) Prague Institute of Chemical Technology, Prague 
Bonnell, Linda M., 1 99 1 . Complimentary Research Associate in Geology and Geophysics 

B.A. (1973); M.S. (1980), Ph.D. (1990) University of Illinois 
Buchanan, J. A., 1961. Senior Research Scientist in Physics 

B.S. (1970) University of Houston 
Bussian, Alfred E., 1991. Complimentary Senior Research Associate in Physics 

B.A. (1955) Ripon College; Ph.D. (1964) University of Colorado 
Cao, Xiaoyun, 1989. Research Associate in Environmental Science and Engineering 

B.S. (1980); M.S. (1982); Nanjing University, PRC; M.A. (1985) Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity; Ph.D. (1989) Iowa State University 
Carbonell, Ramon, 1992. Complimentary Research Associate in Geology and Geophys- 
ics 
Carle, Alan, 1991. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.A. (1984), M.S. (1989), Ph.D. (1991) Rice University 
Chakerian, Artemis E., 1988. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1977) University of New Mexico; Ph.D. (1987) Rice University 
Chandrasekhariah, M.S., 1990. Complimentary Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. (1951), M.S. (1955) Myoore University, India; Ph.D. (1958) University of Wiscon- 
sin at Madison 
Chaplin, David, 1991. Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.A. (1987) Cambridge University, United Kingdom; Ph.D. ( 1991) Warwick University, 

United Kingdom 
Chow, Thomas Wing-Yuk, 1984. Research Associate in Biomedical Engineering 

B.S. (1978) Rice University; Ph.D. (1984) Rice University 
Chu, C. Judith, 1989. Complimentary Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.A. (1971) University of Michigan; Ph.D. (1976) University of Pennsylvania 
Clarage III, James B., 1991 . NIH Research Fellow in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.A. (1985) Illinois Wesleyan University; Ph.D. (1990) Brandeis University 
Clement, J.M., Jr. 1974. Research Scientist in Physics 

B.S. (1965), M.S. (1966) Cornell University; Ph.D. (1972) Renssalaer Polytechnic 

Institute 
da Silva, Jose Roberto G., 1990. Postdoctoral Fellow in Mechanical Engineering and 

Materials Science 

B.S. (1970) University S. Paulo at Sao Carlos; Ph.D. (1976) Rice University 
Dean, Vicky R., 1986. Network Manager in Computer Science 

B.A. (1978) State University of New York, Albany 



^lATE aVlA 'AOUASmmiMGA 5§ 

Delany, Joan M., 1 990. Research Scientist in Chemistry 

B.A. (1974): M.A. ( 1976) University of California. Berkeley; Ph.D. (1981) University of 
California, Los Angeles 

Donelick, Raymond A., 1991. Complimentary Research Associate in Geology and 
Geophysics. 

B.S. (1983) University of Miami: M.S. (1986). Ph.D. (1988) Rensselaer Polytechnic 

Institute. 
Duba, Bruce, F., 1989. Research Associate in Computer Science 

B.S. (1983) State University of New York. Plattsburgh: M.S. (1985) Indiana University 
Dutta, Chizuko, 1989. Research Associate in Physics 

Ph.D. (1969) University of California ^- ' 

Ertan, Inci, 1992. Complimentary Research Associate in Geology and Geophysics 

B.S.. Ph.D. (1971) University of Vienna. Austria 
Espejo, Irene, 1991. Complimentary Research Associate in Geology and Geophysics 

Ph.D. ( 1990) University of Buenos Aires 
Fabian, Marian, 1991. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology '''**^- 

B.A. (1974) University of Prague: Ph.D. (1981) Moscow State University 
Pagan, Michael W., 1990. Research Associate in Computer Science '^^'^ 

B.A./B.S. (1977), M.S. (1987), Ph.D. (1991) Rice University -!QI).A 8 

Fredin. Leif, 1989. Complimentary Research Associate in Chemistry " ' -^""i. 

B.S. ( 1968): Ph.D. ( 1973) University of Lund. Sweden '^ 8 

Galezowski, Wlodzimierz. 1 990. Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

M.S. (1979), Ph.D. ( 1988) Mickiewicz University, Pozan 
Gao, Ru-Shan, 1988. Research Associate in Space Physics and Astronomy *iBA 

B.S. (1982): M.A. (I985i: Ph.D. ( 1987) Rice University 
Gerst, Nicolas, 1990. Visiting Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1984): Ph.D. (1988) Strasbourg University 
Gordon, Mark B., 1992. Research Associate in Geology and Geophysics 

B.A. ( 1984) Carleton College; Ph.D. (1990) University of Texas at Austin ""'"^ 
Gordy, Virginia R., 1986. Research Scientist in Environmental Science & Engineering 

B.S. (1963) Abilene Christian University: M.A. (1969) University of Colorado; Ph.D. 
( 1972) University of Houston 
Griffin, Alfred J., 1 99 1 . Postdoctoral Fellow in Mechanical Engineering and Materials 
Science 

B.S. (1984) University of Texas at El Paso; M.S. (1986) Rice University: Ph.D. (1991) 
Rice University 

Haridas, Kochat, 1989. Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

B.S. ( 1980). M.S. (1982) University of Kerala: Ph.D. (1987) Maharaja Sayajirao Univer- 
sity _:._ 

Harry, Dennis L., 1 989. Research Associate in Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1981). M.S. (1983) Texas A&M Universitv: Ph.D. (1989) University of Texas at 
Dallas 

Hawath, Jack, 1992. Complimentary Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell 

Biology 
He, Jing-Jiu. 1 989. Complimentary Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. ( 1985) Beijing Agricultural University 
Henry, Sam S., 1 989. Department Administrator in Computer Science 

B.A. ( 1966): M.A. (1973) Texas A&M University >t.>i 

Hilmer, Robert V., 1 989. Research Associate in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1982) Boston College: M.S. ( 1986); Ph.D. (1989) Rice University 



54 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Hitti, Bassam, 1991 . Research Associate in Physics 

B.S. ( 198 1) American University of Beinit; M.S. ( 1 984), Ph.D. (1986) College of William 

and Mary 
HofTman, Marvin, 1988. Clinical Professor of Education and Director, School Writing 

Project 

B.S. (1960) College of the City of New York; Ph.D. (1965) Harvard University 
Holliger, Klaus, 1991. Research Associate in Geology and Geophysics 

Degree in Sciences (1987) ETH, Switzerland 
Jain, Ambar, 1990. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1984), M.S. (1986), Ph.D. (1990) APS Rewa 
Jaspars, Marcel, 1992. Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.A. (1987) Cambridge University, United Kingdom; Ph.D. (1991) Trinity College, 

Dublin 
Jiricek, Ivo, 1991. Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

B.S. (1980); M.S. (1985); Ph.D. (1991) Institute of Chemical Technology 
Johnson, Bruce, 1988. Senior Research Scientist in Chemistry 

B.A. (1975) University of Minnesota; Ph.D. (1981) University of Wisconsin 
Johnson, David B., 1990. Research Associate in Computer Science 

B.A. (1982); M.S. (1985); Ph.D. (1990) Rice University 
Jones, Carloyn, 1990. Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. (1985) Central Washington University; Ph.D. (1990) University of Washington 
Kamath, Purnima, 1990. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1980) Mysore University; M.S. (1985), Ph.D. (1990) Mangalore University 
Kamensky, Yury, 1990. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1972), Ph.D. (1980) Moscow State University 
Kan, Amy T., 1985. Research Associate in Environmental Science and Engineering 

B.Sc. (1975) Fu-Jen Catholic University, Taipei, Taiwan; M.S. (1978); Ph.D. (1982) 

Cornell University 
Kapusta, Sergio, 1988. Complimentary Research Associate in Chemistry 

M.S. (1975) University of Buenos Aires; Ph.D. (1975) Rice University 
Khabashesku, Olga, 1992. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1978); Ph.D. (1983) Moscow State University 
Khabashesku, Valery, 1991. Visiting Scholar in Chemistry 

B.S. (1973) Moscow State University; Ph.D. (1979) N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic 

Chemistry, USSR 
Kisic, A., 1973. Senior Research Scientist and Departmental Administrator in 
Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1954); Ph.D. (1961) University of Zagreb, Croatia 
Kittrell, Carter, 1988. Senior Research Scientist in Chemistry 

B.S. (1971) Allegheny College 
Knox, Robert, 1990. Complimentary Senior Research Associate in Ecology and 

Evolutionary Biology , , 

B.A. (1978) Princeton University; Ph.S. (1987) University of North Carolina 
Ko, Chi-Ren C, 1980. Research Associate in Mechanical Engineering & Materials 

Science 

B.S. (1968) National Taiwan Normal University; M.S. (1975) Texas A & M; Ph.D. (1980) 
University of Houston 
Kook, Alan Mark, 1985. NMR Manager in Chemistry 

B.S. (1974) SUNY at Stonybrook; Ph.D. (1984) University of Kentucky 



'A"^01T7.«T>i/!lWGA 5^ 

Kulkarni, Anil D., 1988. Complimentary Senior Research Associate in Biochemistry and 

Cell Biology 

B.S. (1963); M.S. (1970) University of Bombay 
Kulmacz, Richard J., 1 990. Complimentary Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell 

Biology 

B.A. (1972) Central Connecticut State College; Ph.D. (1978) Rice University 
Lanius, Cynthia, 1991. Complimentary Visiting Scholar in Mathematics 

B.S. (1986) Middle Tennessee State University " •''' 

Lewis, Robert M., 1989. Research Associate in Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. (1982). M.A. (1988). Ph.D. (1989) Rice University '^^^ 

Li, Guangye, 1990. Senior Research Associate in Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. (1968). M.S. (1981) Jilin University, PRC: Ph.D. (1986) Rice University '''^■ 

Li, Tiansheng, 1992. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1985) Peking University, Beijing; Ph.D. (1992) University of Missouri -^^'^^'^^^ 
Li, Wenbao, 1990. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1984), M.S. (1987) Shangdong University; Ph.D. (1990) Academia Sinica, China 
Li, Yan, 1991. Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. (1986) Fudan University; Ph.D. (1991) Rice University 
Liao, Quang-ling, 1986. Visiting Scholar in Biochemistry and Cell Biology ^ ' 

M.S. (1983) Chinese Academy of Sciences; B.S. (1986) Peking University 
Lief, Eugene, 1992. Research Associate in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1977); M.S. (1979) Leningrad State University; Ph.D. ( 1987) Leningrad Polytech- 
nic University and Lenigrad Institute of Nuclear Physics, USSR 
Lin, Shuo-Liang, 1990. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1982) Zhongshan University; M.S. (1984) New York University; Ph.D. (1988) 

University of Illinois 
Lindsay, Bernard G., 1987. Research Associate in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1984); Ph.D. (1987) Queen's University of Belfast. England 
Linsley, Braddock K., 1991. Research Associate in Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1982) St. Lawrence University; M.S. (1984) University of South Carolina; Ph.D. 

(1990) University of New Mexico 
Liu, Yuan-Ching, 1 99 1 . Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Biochemistry and Cell 

Biology 

B.S. (1983) Wuhan University; M.S. (1978) University of Toronto; Ph.D. (1991) Rice 

University 
Lou. Liang, 1990. Research Associate in Physics 

h.S. (1982) Fudan University. PRC; Ph.D. (1987) Indiana University 
I owe, Mark, 1991. Research Associate in Physics ^^ 

B.S. (1986) Michigan State University; Ph.D. (1991) University of Minnesota 
Lu. Ming, 1987. Research Associate in Physics 

B.S.( 1968) Science and Technology University of Shanghai; M.A. ( 1987) Shanghai Jiao- 

Tong University 
I no. Weimei, 1991. Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistr>' 

I-. .'s '.08?^: M.S. ( 1986>; Ph.D. ( 1989) East China Lniversitv ol Chemicai Technology, 

Si a'lgiiai 
I >(tns. Philip. 1991 . CompiimentarvResearch Associate in Biochemisty and Cell Biology 

h S •':'~8' Stephen F Austin State I'niversiiy: M.S '1981 Texas A&M Univer^in • 

PI: D. /! 985 ) lni\ ersiiy of Georgia 
Magahaddas, Shadi, 1992. Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow m Chemistrx' 

B S '1987); M.S. (1988) Pittsbure Stale Lniversitv; Ph D. ' .99: ■ Ker:: State l'n)\ersit\ 



56 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Marriott, Terry D., 1978. Scientist and Instrument Manager in Chemistry 

B.S. (1969), Ph.D. (1976) Oklahoma State University 
Mazina, Mark, 1991. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.A. (1973); Ph.D. ( 1991 ) University of California at San Diego 
McKay, Colin, B., 1988. Research Scientist III in Biomedical Engineering 

B.S. (1973) University of Strathclyde, Scotland; Ph.D. (1980) University of Compiegne, 

France I 

Mhaskar, Sunil, 1989. Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. (1979): M.S. ( 1981 ) University of Poona; Ph.D. ( 1988) Malti-Chem Research Centre 
Miller, Charles, 1991. Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

B.S. (1986) Duke University; Ph.D. (1991) University of California at Berkeley 
Miyazaki, Kiminori, 1992. Complimentary Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.Eng. (1985); M.Eng. (1987) Nagasaki University, Japan 
Moore, Douglas, 1989. Research Associate in Computer Science and Associate of Jones 

College 

B.A. (1983) Rice University; M.A. (1987) Cornell University 
Morter, Cheryl, 1990. Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Chemistry 

B.S. (1981) Carnegie-Mellon University; Ph.D. (1988) University of Chicago 
Muthukrishnan, Kamalam, 1987. Senior Research Assistant in Biochemistry and Cell 

Biology 

B.Sc. (1973), M.Sc. ( 1975) University of Madras, India; Ph.D. ( 1981 ) Indian Institute of 

Technology, Madras, India 
Nollert, Matthias U., 1987. Research Associate in Biomedical Engineering 

B.S. (1981) University of Virginia; Ph.D. (1986) Cornell University 
Norem, Nathan, 1990. Complimentary Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. (1979) Augustana College; M.S. ( 1986); Ph.S. ( 1989) Rice University 
Oddo, John E., 1988. Senior Research Associate in Environmental Science and 

Engineering 

B.S. (1969) University of Akron; M.S. (1971) University of Toledo; Ph.D. (1980) Rice 

University 
Ortiz, Luis, 1 992. Complimentary Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. Instituto Jorge Robbdo, Columbia; M.S. Universidad Pontificia Bolivarians, Colum- 
bia; Ph.D. Tulane University; Ph.D. University of Texas Health Science Center 
Pal, Biman, 1990. Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. ( 1978); M.S. (1980) University of Bombay; M.S. (1984) Clarkson University; Ph.D. 

( 1989) University of Akron 
Palchuru, Siva, 1991. Complimentary Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. ( 1983) J.B. College, Kavali; M.S. (1985); Ph.D. (1988) Sri Venkateswara, Kavali 
Pandit, Amit, 1990. Research Associate in Chemical Engineering 

B.Tech. (1982). M.Tech. (1984) University of Calcutta; Ph.D. (1986) University of 
Bombay 
Pan, Tsorng-Whay, 1991. Complimentary Visitng Scholar in Mathematics 

B.S. (1980) National Taiwan University; Ph.D. (1990) University of Minnesota at 

Minneapolis 
Papakonstantinou, Anne, 1991 . Complimentary Visiting Scholar in Mathematics 

B.A. (1969); M.A. ( 1971) Rice University 

Patterson, Donald E., 1 990. Research Scientist in Chemistry 

B.A. (1982), M.S. (1984) The University of Texas at El Paso; M.A. (1987). Ph.D. (1989) 
Rice University 



Payandeh, Behnaz, 1987. Senior Research Associate in Chemical Engineering 

Diploma (1973); Ph.D. (1978) Swiss Federal Institute of Technology 
Peariman, Michael D., 1986. System Manager in Mathematical Sciences 

B.Sc. (1975) Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada; M.S. (1978) Cornell University 
Pinkerton, Frederick D., 1989. Senior Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell 

Biology 

B.S. (1969) Eastern Montana College; Ph.D. (1976) Montana State University j 
Price, Maureen G. 1988. Senior Research Scientist in Biochemistry and Cell Biology and 

Member, Institute for Biosciences and Bioengineering 

B.A. (1973) Goucher College; Ph.D. (1980) University of Pennsylvania f 

Quintero, Lirio, 1990. Complimentary Research Associate in Chemical Engineering 

B.S. (1979) University of Anoles (Venezuela); M.S. (1981). Ph.D. (1983) University of 

Paris VliPierre et Marie Curie (France) 
Raghavachari, Ramesh, 1991. Research Associate in Chemistry - i 

B.S. National College, Bangalore; M.S. University of Delhi, Delhi; Ph.D. Temple 

University 
Rifai, Hanadi S., 1989. Research Associate in Environmental Science and Engineering 

B.E. (1982) American University of Beirut, Lebanon; M.S. (1985); Ph.D. (1989) Rice 

University 
Saha, Bidhan Chandra, 1989. Welch Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow in Physics 

M.S. (1969; Rajshahi University, Bangladesh; Ph.D. (1976) Calcutta University, India 
Schubert, Frank D., 1988. Kennedy Research Associate in Religious Studies 

B.S. (1981) University of San Francisco; D.Th. (1983) Oxford; Ph.D. (1987) Boston 

University • « > - ■ - •-- 

Shukia, Keshawa, 1989. Research Associate in Chemical Engineering • ~"t( P 

B.S. (1971), M.S. (1973), Ph.D. (1978) Banaras University 
Siddiqui, Abdul, 1989. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1979) Osmania University, Hyderabad, India; M.S. (1981) Aligarh University,'' 

India; Ph.D. (1989) Osmania University, Hyderabad. India ' 

Skeens, John D., 1990. Research Associate in Physics *' '" •?!•"-■ -^8 

B.A. (1983) Wartburg College; Ph.D. (1989) Iowa State University 
Soitero, Luis, 1991. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.A. (1981), M.C.S. (1985), Ph.D. (1990) Rice University -.^ - ■'>*i'^ 

Song, Kyoo Y., 1978. Senior Research Associate in Chemical Engineering 

B.S. ( 1971 ) Han Yang University; M.S. ( 1973) University of New Mexico; Ph.D. ( 1978) 

Clemson University 
Spann, Timothy, 1991. Complimentary Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell 

Biology 

B.S. (1982); M.S. (1983) University of California at Davis; Ph.D. ( 1991) University of 

California at San Diego 
Spiro, Robert W., 1978. Senior Research Scientist in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.A. (1968) University of Dallas; Ph.D. (1978) University of Texas— Dallas 
Stancu, Ion, 1990. Research Associate in Physics 

Diplom-Physiker( 1987) University of Deusseldorf, Germany; M.A. (1988), Ph.D. (1990) 

Rice University -; 

Stim, Kathleen P., 1989. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1983) Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Ph.D. (1989) Florida 

State University. Tallahassee 
Swaminathan, Shankar, 1989. Research Associate in Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

M.S. ( 1980) University of Poona. India; Ph.D. (1985) University of Baroda, India 



58 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Thomas, J. Michele, 1984. Research Associate in Environmental Science and 

Engineering 

B.S. (1976) American University; M.S. (1980); Ph.D. (1983) Cornell University 
Toffoletto, Frank R., 1987. Senior Research Associate in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.Sc. (1981) Latrobe University, Melbourne, Australia; Ph.D. (1987) Rice University 
Torczon, Virginia, 1989. Research Associate in Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. (1978) Wesleyan University; M.A. (1988), Ph.D. (1989) Rice University 
Toshkov, Stoyan, 1990. Research Associate in Physics 

Ph.D. (1969) University of Sofia 
Van Buren, Charles T., 1985. Complimentary Senior Research Associate in Biochemis- 
try and Cell Biology 

B.S. (1968) College of Wooster; M.D. (1972) University of Pennsylvania 
Wang, Lai-Sheng, 1990. Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. (1982) Wahan University; Ph.D. (1990) University of California at Berkeley 
Wang, Tong, 1985. Senior Research Scientist in Mechanical Engineering 

Ph.D. (1985) Rice University 
Weiser, Alan, 1989. Research Associate in Mathematical Sciences 

B.A. (1976) Rice University; Ph.D. (1981) Yale University 
Weiss, Loretta, 1992. Postdoctoral Fellow in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1984) University of Texas at Austin; M.S. (1988); Ph.D. (1992) Rice University 
Wellington, Gerard M., 1990. Complimentary Research Associate in Geology and 

Geophysics 

B.A. (1971) San Jose State University; Ph.D. (1981) University of California at Santa 

Barbara. 
White, David, 1992. Complimentary Visitng Scholar in Chemistry 

B.A. (1962) St. John's University; Ph.D. (1966) University of Wisconsin 
Wilhelm, Mark, 1987. Complimentary Research Associate in Chemistry 
Williamson, Karen, 1989. Research Associate in Mathematical Sciences 

B.S. (1983), M.A. (1988), Ph.D. (1988) Rice University 
Wilson, William K., 1982. Assistant Director of Laboratory of Basic Medical Sciences 

B.A. (1970) Earlham College; Ph.D. (1982) University of New Mexico 
Wise, J.D., 1978. Research Engineer in Electrical and Computer Engineering 

B.A. (1970). M.E.E. (1971), Ph.D. (1977) Rice University 
Wyld, Sandra, 1991. Complimentary Research Associate in Geology and Geophysics 

B.S. (1982) University of Illinois; M.S. (1985) University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D. 

(1992) Stanford University 
Xiao. Zhenglong, 1991. Postdoctoral Research Associate in Chemistry 

B.S. (1982) Nankai University, China; M.S. (1991), Ph.D. ( 1991 ) Rice University 
Vang, Yong-Shiang, 1992. Research Associate in Space Physics and Astronomy 

B.S. (1984) Yunnan University, China; M.S. (1989); Ph.D. (1992) Rice University 
Zhang, Xia, 1990. Research Associate in Physics 

B.S. (1985) Peking University; M.A. (1988), Ph.D. (1991 ) Rice University •" ' 

Zheng, Nanjiu, 1990. Research Associate in Physics 

B.A. (1982) Fudan University. Shanghai; Ph.D. (1990) Arizona State University 
Zhou, Xiadong, 1991. Research Associate in Mathematics 



59 

School of Continuing Studies Program Development Staff 

Carlson-Abbey, Edith, 1978. Assistant Dean, Director of Programs 

B.S. (1976) Georgia Tech . . V'"^- • . 

Hsu, Laura, 1980. Assistant Dean, Director of Programs > 

Ph.D. (1980) University of Miami ' ' '" 

Mclntire, Mary, 1975. Dean " ' *^' ' '' 

Ph.D. (1975) Rice University . • 

Sayers, Kathleen, 1983. Associate Dean, Director of Language Programs 

Ph.D. (1981) University of Texas ».-.<'«». 

Valhonrat, Susan, 1989. Program Director '^^.^ f -. t.i :'.;./uj ,^':-': AH 

M.B.A. (1990) University of Houston ' '"■''^^ -*H^if.«J ;*'« - !><<•" -wun- 

; ::j -ijirijiA bn/' iiA .PTf i .^tiielV: Hi fSKiv^Sm^iS 

J I y H/ • .. , : • : ... . c -,. t ?r,.,, , , ... , .^ . ^,,,.1;. _, , ,.-<.,_,,/ '"O: ) a, Q 

Professional Staff of the Fondren Library "' ^ 

Baber, Elizabeth Ann, 1965. Director, Data Base Management vjosiy 

B.A. (1960) Rice University; M.L.S. (1961) University of California at Berkeley 

Boothe, Nancy L., 1 965. Director, Woodson Research Center and University Associate of 
Brown College 

B.A. (1952) Rice Institute; M.S. L.S.( 1965) Catholic University of America; M. A. (1979) 
Rice University 
Burgett, Mary L., 1989. Director, Department of Processing Services 

B.S. (1974) University of Wisconsin at Whitewater; M.L.S. (1975) University of Ken- 
tucky 
Caswell, Jean L., 1986. Automation Librarian 

B.A. (1974) New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; M.A.L.S. (1976) Northern 

Illinois University . ii-. 

Charles, Elizabeth D., 1983. Executive Director, Friends of Fondren ■"'f'" » ' ^^3 

B.A. (1963) University of Texas ..;,-.,/ .^^ '"q " ' .^- 

Edwards, Sandra E., 1985. Head of Satellite Collections ' '" ' - "-"^ " *"- - 

B.A. (1980) Grinnell College; M.A. (1982), M.A.L.S. (1984) University of Missouri 
Flowers, Kay A., 1978. Assistant University Librarian for Automated Services .^ i 

B.A. (1977) Rice University; M.S. (1984) University of Illinois ^ 

Gourlay, Una M., 1986. Director, Department of Community Services ., , .- ^, " ,^^v 

B.Sc. (1958) University of Glasgow • >^^ff^ 

Halbert, Martin D., 1988. Automation and Reference Librarian , ^ ^ 

B.A. (1984) Rice University; M.L.I.S. (1987) University of Texas 
Hatfield, Joseph W., 1984. Assistant to the University Librarian for Building Services 

A. A. (1966) Lon Morris College 3 ;<;;.; I y^\f\tl?, ,hsiiff^ 

Hunter, John H., 1990. Science Librarian 

B.S. (1972) Wiley College; M.L.S. (1974) Indiana University 
Hyman, Feme B., 1968. Assistant University Librarian for Special Services and Univer- 
sity Associate of Baker College 

B.A. (1948) University of California at Los Angeles; M.A. (1969) Loyola University of 

Los Angeles; M.S.L.S. (1969) University of Illinois 
Keck, Kerry A.. 1985. Coordinator. Collection Development and Electronic Information 

Resources 

B.A. (1980) University of Colorado; M.S.L.S. (1982) University of Illinois 



60 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Kile, Barbara, 1971. Director, Department of Government f*ublications and Special 
Resources and Assistant to the University Librarian for Public Relations/Develop- 
ment 
B.A. ( 1967), M.S.L.S. (1968) University of Illinois • t 

Kuo, Jiun-Huei Chern, 1985. Catalog Librarian 

B.A. (1978) National Taiwan University; A.M.L.S. (1982) University of Michigan . , , 

Lowman, Sara, 1985. Head of Reference 

B.A. (1984) Carleton College. M.A.L.I.S. (1985) University of Iowa 

Marsales, Rita, 1973. Catalog Maintenance Librarian 

B.A. ( 1957) Louisiana State University; M.L.S. ( 1973) University of Texas 

Orkiszewski. Paul T., 1992. Music Librarian 

B.A./M.A. (1988) Rice University: M.L.I. S. ( 1989) University of Texas at Austin 

Prendeville, Jet Marie, 1979. Art and Architecture Librarian 

B.A. ( 1972) Memphis State University; M.A. ( 1975) University of Michigan; M.S.L.S. 

( 1979) University of Illinois 
Reagor, Melinda A., 1992. Director, Cataloging Department 

A.B. (1977) Wellesley College; M. Div. (1980) Yale Divinity School; M.L.I.S. (1982) 

University of Texas at Austin 
Sabin, Robert G., 1988. Science and Engineering Librarian and University Associate of 

Hanszen College 

B.S. (1967) University of North Dakota; M.S.L.S. (1968) Clarion University 
Schwartz, Charles A., 1987. Social Sciences Librarian 

B.A. (1968) Denison University; Ph.D. (1972) University of Virginia; M.L.S. (1985) 

Indiana University 
Segal, Jane D., 1990. User Education Librarian 

B.A. (1970) Kalamazoo College; M.L.S. (1977) Western Michigan University 
Shapiro, Beth J., 1991. University Librarian 

B.S. ( 1968) Michigan State University; M.A. (1972) Michigan State University; M.S.L. 

( 1974) Western Michigan University; Ph.D. (1982) Michigan State University 
Shaw, Peggy A., 1986. Business Librarian 

B.A. ( 1970), B.S. (1972) Louisiana State University; M.L.S. (1982) North Texas State 
University 

Silversteen, Sophy, 1965. Catalog Librarian 

B.A. (1952) Rice Institute; M.S.S.W. (1954), M.L.S. (1965) University of Texas 

Stewart, Barbara C, 1991. Government Publications/Reference Collection Develop- 
ment Librarian 
B.A. (1981) Texas Woman's University; (1991) M.L.S. University of North Texas 

Tibbits, Randolph K., 1987. Information Librarian 

B.A. (1970); M.A. ( 1977) Washington University; M.L.S. ( 1980) University of Texas 

Wetzel, Shirley, 1983. Cataloging Librarian 

A. A. (1960) Navarro College; B.A. (1968) Texas Technological College; M.A. (1980) 
Rice University 



zioo'iii to YJikrjsvinU {t%vi} .2.J.8.M robsTOloJ to \(li8n3winU 



Emeritus -nj^i 

Adier, Marianne G., 1974. Director Emerita, Division of Processing Services 

B.A. (1973) Rice University; M.L.S. (1974) University of Texas; M.A. (1977) Rice 
University 

Perrine, Richard H., 1960. Assistant University Librarian for Planning and Adjunct 

Associate Professor of Architecture, Emeritus 

B.F.A. (1940) Yale University; M.L.S. (1961) University of Texas 
Redmon, Alice Jane, 1962. Special Processing Librarian Emerita .(j .zihoA 

B.A. (1937) University of Denver , . ,,,. ; .(i ,nBil JJ 

Zingler, Gilberta, 1953. Acquisitions Librarian Emerita ^ .,, ,, ,,.,,!«' i cfyw'i ; z it 

A.B. (1932) Butler University: B.L.S. (1935) University of Illinois - ,jio5gniJ 

. / 3 

Wii'e. <: Professional Staff of Information Systems ^''■^ 

Boyes, David E., 1989. Systems Programmer 

B.A. (1988), M.A. (1988) University of Oregon . 

Campbell, Jay A., 1979. Technical Support Specialist ;:^' ;''r' '':''' ^"'V'^^ ... 
Chien,Jien-Cheng, 1989. Computer Operator . '! 'J. 

B.S.( 1972) Chung-Hsing University ', . 

Cohn, Sheldon, 1973. Computer Operator ' ' ""^^ /"' ° ^ ^ 

Cortes, Alexander F., 1990. Technical Support Specialist ■ -.,. -^ c^!-^^-.»'vt»-. 

A.S. (1989) Houston Community College "' ' ,? i.,'^ ^ .^ . ., , 

Cosgriff, Carolyn E., 1991. Microcomputing/Documentation Specialist ^' '„</,; '. ,- 

B.A. (1988) University of Texas at Austin 
Deuel, John R., 1987. Systems Programmer ^^ a^ y 

B.A. (1990) Rice University H a H a 

Doyle, James E., 1988. Assistant Director of Business Affairs '^■''' '''-^"^ .ri^^r '^I 

B.S. (1969) Southern Illinois University, M.B.A. (1981) Governors State University 
Dunham, A. Darren., 1992. Microcomputer Consulting Specialist 

B. A. ( 1 992) Rice University ! "^ '^ 

Foulston, Catherine A., 1990. Network Specialist ''"^ 

B.A. (1989) Rice University ' 

Garcia, Raymond A., 1979. Senior Systems Analyst ., . V- q 

Gerbode, Farrell E., 1974. Director, Networking & Computing Systems ^^ " '^^^ ''" 

B.A. (1973) Rice University, Master of Applied Mathematical Sciences (1977) Rice 
University 

Halbert, Martin D., 1988. Computing Reference Area Librarian 

B.A. (1984) Rice University. M.L.I. S. (1987) University of Texas (Austin) 
Hardy, Christopher, 1990. Systems Programmer -^'^ 

Harris, Mayfield, 1 99 1 . LAN Specialist/Trainer ^ '^ 

B.S. (1978) Southern University ^ Shnu^ 

Humphrey, Patrick L., 1989. Computer Operator ^-"^ < ^^"^f ' ■^^• 

B.A. (1977) University of Houston ^ /"i^nAi^. 

Huston, Prisciila Jane, 1969. Director, Computing Information Services ^ '^ 

B.A. (1964) Mount Holyoke College ■'""' ' '' "■''^•^ ^ •'■^■'^'^ 

' '(n:>j' ; i^Juqrno J .V8VI .looritiX .iuplbbiS 

aoj;.n(rl?fcV/lc nurs/irCi ^ 1891) .2 8 



62 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Istre, Mitchell, 1988. Systems Analyst ' * 

A.A.S. (1983) Texas State Technical Institute 
Jankovsky, Karel, 1991. Database Administrator 

B.S. ( 1977). M.B.A. (1984) University of Witwatersrand 
Johnson, Michelle, 1991 . Computing Reference Area Operations Coordinator t**^ 
Kittrell, Jr. Aubery L., 1987. Senior Systems Analyst 

B.A. (1979) University of West Florida 
Kowis, Thelma I., 1981. Data Control Coordinator 
Li, Jian, Q., 1991. Network Specialist 

B.S. (1983) University of Kansas. M.S. (1989) University of Kansas 
Linscott, Stephen, 1989. Computing Resource Center Programmer/Trainer 

B.A. (1960) University of Texas 
Manning, William C, 1991. Network Specialist 

BSBA ( 1989) Kennedy Western University .- -■i'-,-|<} 

Martin, Andrea M., 1 979. Manager. Computing Resource Center 

B.S.E.E. (1979). M.Mus.( 1984) Rice University ^ ,^„^., ^«„i 
Martinez, Hortencia, 1990. Systems Analyst ,>,- 

A.S. (1979) Laredo Junior College 
McDonald, Victor, 1990. Computer Operator 
McKinin, Katherine, 1985. Computing Resource Center Programmer 

B.A. (1976), M.A. (1978) Indiana University. M.B.A. (1983) University of Missouri 
Metrowsky, Nicholas J., 1991. Systems Programmer 

B.A. (1979) Ohio State University. MBA (1988) Amber University 
Murray, Thomas, 1990. Information Analyst 
Nettle, Pamela Kay, 1991. Systems Programmer 

B.A. (1986) University of Texas at Austin 
Nichols, Patricia, 1978. Computer Operator 
Pietsch, Robert, 1991. Unix Consulting Specialist 

B.B.A. ( 1989) Eastern Michigan University 
Porras, Francisco, 1989. Director, Administrative Computing 

B.S.( 1972) Universidad Central de Venezuela; B.S. equiv.( 1986) Kensington University 
Ramos, Alfredo, 1990. Computer Operator 
Randolph, Valeria F., 1991. Systems Analyst 

B.A. ( 1973) Institute of Economics (Kharvov, USSR) 
Richard, Charles A., 1973. Manager, Computer and Network Operations 
Richardson, J.R., 1985. Computing Resource Center Programmer 

B.S.Ch.E. (1974). M.Ch.E. (1974). B.A. (1974), M.B.A. (1986), Rice University 
Riddle, Prentiss A.S., 1991. Systems Programmer 

B.A. ( 1984) University of Texas at Austin 
Rodriguez, Arthur A., 1988. Technical Support Specialist mii 

A.S. (1982) New York Regents ,,_rj 

Russell, Kenneth, 1988. Computing Resource Center Programmer 

B.S. (1978) Prairie View ^IliqmuH 

Schafer, Richard A., 1 974. Manager, Networking and S^sterns^Sujjport , , 

B.A. (1973) M.A. M.S. ( 1974) Rice University ,y^;(j (j^^jj ^^g^ g; 
Scott, P. Renae, 1990. Senior Systems Analyst ^^.^,,^^ ^Ao^[oHuwoM ^i^^i , .A c. 

B.S. (1984) Memphis State 
Siddiqui, Zahoor, 1989. Computer Operator 

B.S. (1981) University of Washington 



7 ?iy>[UQA #^ 

Smith, N. Elizabeth, 1987. Computing Resource Center Programmer /fij^ 

B.A. (1985) University of Delaware ^jj^^^jj ^^^^q 

Spradley, Geoffrey, 1990. Unix Consulting Specialist u '^^"PM C . ' 

B.A. (1984) Rice University ' ^^' ^'--t.. ' » 

Stien, Marie-Pierre, 1990. Senior Systems Analyst 

B.A. (1986) F.C. Lyon, M.B.A. (1986) University of Texas (Austin) 
Troth, Richard, 1989. Systems Programmer 
Tunison, Jeffrey, 1989. Systems Programmer ^ „ ., „ . 

B.A. (1991) Rice University , _,, ^^^.,.,5^3^.^101? 

Vasquez, Michael, 1978. Computer Operator "-'J.-' ,- V 

Walters, Joseph, 1990. Deputy Director, Owlnet 

B.S.E.E. (1985) Rice University 
Wetstone, Evan, 1988. Network Specialist > ^Clfi 

B.A. (1988) Rice University •''-'(•' .iiic><? .0 ,qin>nt>.4nd!a 

White, Carolynne M., 1988. Computing Training Coordinator i ../^f iC^'v' i , .\.3 

B.S. (1964) Springfield College ' • -^ -i .-.slJuP 

WilUamson, Mark R., 197 1 . Assistant to the Director for Technical Affairs : .i 
Yueh, Leon F., 1 99 1 . System Analyst ' ' -^ 

B.S. (1981), M.S. (1983) University of Alabama at Birmingham ">'•'«{> ,sh-^.'!G;>*>"> 



Professional Staff of Student Affairs 

Clack, Catherine E., 1981. Director, Office of Multicultural Affairs ' .;nfevt a'? 

B.A. (1981) St. Edwards University 'v.' ' '- 

Crawford, Sarah Nelson, 1987. Director, Office of Student Activities ■ •^" ^ ' ""'' 

B.S. (1979) Texas Woman's University, M.A. (1983) Bowling Green State University 
Dunham, Jane, 1986. Director of International Services 

B.A. (1964)ComellUniversity, M.A. (1987) University of Houston • " ' ■' S 

Hunt, G. David, 1976. Director, Office of Financial Aid - (i; /^ .mri'icii) 

B.A. ( 1950) DePauw University, M.S. (1954) Indiana University ' ' " - ' ^ '' 
Lanier, Cynthia, 1989. Director, Health Education Office 

R.N. (1978) Brackenridge School of Nursing, B.A. (1985) University of Texas/Austin, 

M.P.H. (1987) University of Texas Health Science Center 
Martin, Patricia S., 1982. Associate Dean of Student Affairs and Director, Office of 

Academic Advising 

B.S.Ed. (1959) Abilene Christian University, M.A. ( 1977), Ph.D. (1982) Rice University 
Moss, Ron W., 1981. Director, Office of Admission 

B.S. (1974), M.A. (1975) Texas Christian University 
Sanborn, Robert D., 1988, Associate Dean of Student Affairs and Director, Career 

Services Center 

B.A. (1980) Florida State University, M.S.Ed. (1985) Northern Illinois University, 
E.D.D. (1990) Columbia University 

Scheid, Mark S., 1984. Associate Director of Academic Advising 

B.A. (1967). Ph.D. (1972) Rice University 
Vest, Martha V., 1976, Director, Student Center 
Williamson, J. G., 1981, Registrar 

B.S. (1964), M.S. (1964), Ph.D. (1968) Ohio State University 



lllg 


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64 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Staff of the Health Service and Counseling Center '' 

Doran, Lindley E., 1991 . Director, Rice Counseling Center -, 

Ph.D. (1976) University of Illinois 
Jenkins, Mark, M.D., 1992 Student Health Service ,j^^ 

Kirkland, Kim M., R.N., 1990. Nurse 
Martin, Janet M., R.N., 1990. Nurse 
Schnee, Amanda M., M.D., 1981. Director of the Student Health Service 

M.B., Ch.B. (1968) St. Andrews University, Scotland 
Story, Deborah A., 1991. Associate Director, Rice Counseling Center 

Ph.D. (1989), Colorado State University 

Staff of the Athletic Department 

Blankenship, D. Paul, 1980. Women's Tennis Coach 

B.A. (1972) Texas Christian University ■■ ♦--'*^^ '*' 

Butler, James E., M.D., 1977. Chief Team Physician 

B.S. (1956) Sewanee College; M.A. (1957) Southwest Texas State; M.D. (1962) Univer- 
sity of Texas 
Castaneda, James A., 1961. Faculty Representative and Golf Coach 

B.A. (1954) Drew University: M.A. (1955) Yale University; Ph.D. (1958) Yale Univer- 
sity 
Cousins, William A., 1983. Assistant Athletic Director/Media Relations 

B.S. (1971) New Mexico State 
Dunavant, S. Michael, 1989. Head Women's Basketball Coach 

B.A. (1977) Bridgewater College 
Eggert, Allen, 1968. Head Athletic Trainer 

B.S. (1963) Rice University; M.A. (1967) California Western University 
Goldsmith, Fred H., 1989. Head Football Coach 

B.S. (1967), M.Ed. (1972) Univeristy of Florida 
Graham, Wayne L., 1991. Head Baseball Coach 

B.S. (1970) M.Ed. (1973) University of Houston 
Griswold, Julie L. 1986. Academic Coordinator 

B.A. (1981) Miami University; B.S. (1981) Miami University; M.S. (1986) Indiana 

University 
Harris, James E., 1986. Assistant Athletic Director/Development 

B.S. (1971) Bowling Green State University 
Hawthorne, Martha E., 1979. Assistant Athletic Director for Women 

B.A. (1960), B.S. (1961), M.S. (1964) Louisiana State University 
Irwin, Keith, 1983. Weight and Strength Coach 

B.S. ( 1979) Fort Hays State University 
Kidd, Stephen., 1990. Recruiting Coordinator 

B.A. (1987) Rice University. 
Lopez, Victor M., 1980. Head Women's Track and Field Coach 

B.S. (1971) University of Houston; M.S. (1975) Texas Southern University 
May, John Robert, 1967. Director of Athletics 

B.Comm. (1965) Rice University 
Moniaci, Steve, 1980. Assistant Athletic Director for Administration 

B.S. (1975) Ball State University; M.S. (1976) Ohio University 
Sokol, Debra L., 1980. Head Volleyball Coach 

B.A. (1980) University of Houston 



Steele, David B., 1984. Assistant Athletic Director/Business 

B.A. ( 1982) Rice University; M.A. (1984) Ohio University 
Straub, Stephen M., 1974. Head Men's Track and Field Coach 

B.Comm. ( 1972) Rice University 
Turville, Lawrence C, 1979. Men's Tennis Coach 

B.S. (1971) Georgia Tech 
Wilson, Willis T., 1992. Head Men's Basketball Coach 

B.A. (1982) Rice University . , , . ,^^ \ 

Wingenroth, Kristin B., 1983. Swimming Coach Mf „n-)'n 

B.A. (1976) Rice University; M.Ed. (1983) University of Houston 

University Standing Committee 
for 1992-93 



The president is an ex officio member of all committees. 



Committee on Admission 
Committee on Affirmative Action 
Committee of the College Masters 
Committee on Community Affairs ».cfn°i! 

Committee on Computers 
Education Council 
Committee on Environmental Health and Safety 
Committee on Examinations and Standing 
Faculty Council 
Committee on Fringe Benefits v-' -wi.li 
3on/ Graduate Council :' , 'L-- 

Committee on the Library 
Committee on Public Lectures " -< ^•^'^ 'i''ol 
Committee on Religious Activities 
Research Council 
Residential Colleges Management Advisory Committee 
Rice University Athletics Committee 
Rice University Marshals Committee 
A Rice University Press Review Board 

r'.a ..--. R.O.T.C. Committee 

- c ! Committee on Salary Equity 

rl.r Committee on Scholarships and Awards 
Committee on Student Affairs 
Committee on Student Financial Aid 
^ f^- ■ ^ Committee on Student Health 

^' Committee on the Undergraduate Curriculum ■:,^: 

Committee on Undergraduate Teaching 
T'heHaroictr : ' University Council ., 

{T University Review Board ''' 

noiJEiJaininibAJ^n '- .^.iCi . r-' 11 -.',?3l 

2oi2\(rtqo3U ni ttfidD noiJebnooH ;I03>^ .(/ W 



66 ADMINISTRATION AND STAFF 

Chairs and Lectureships 



Throughout its history. Rice University has been especially fortunate in the 
"^ number of its friends and benefactors. Some of these are memorialized in the 
names of buildings and special physical facilities; others have generously pro- 
vided for the enrichment of the University ' s intellectual life by establishing chairs 
and lectureships either on a temporary or permanent basis. Rice takes pleasure in 
recognizing on these pages some of these contributors to its academic excellence. 

J. S. Abercrombie Chairs in the School of Engineering 
Agnes Cullen Arnold Chair in Humanities 
Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Administration 
. r - , . • • Herbert S. Autrey Chair in Humanities 

y~ " Lynette S. Autrey Chairs in Humanities 

;-,,;•'; > Herbert S. Autrey Chairs in Social Sciences 

Lynette S. Autrey Chair in Social Sciences 
Lynette S. Autrey Chair in Humanities — Music 
_,.;,- ri*vi-^, ;. ■ Lynette S. Autrey Chair in Management 

Brown and Root Chair in Engineering 
George R. Brown Chair in Administration 
,- I >;nv Herman and George R. Brown Chair in Civil Engineering 

Andrew Hays Buchanan Chairs in Astrophysics 
D. R. Bullard — Welch Foundation Chair in Science 
E. D. Butcher Chairs 
Louis Calder Chair in Chemical Engineering 
Harry S. Cameron Chair in Mechanical Engineering 
Harry and Hazel Chavanne Chair in Religious Studies 
Allyn R. and Gladys M. Cline Chair in Economics and Finance 
Allyn R. and Gladys M. Cline Chair in History 
■j' ■-'''' John W. Cox Chair in Biochemical and Genetic Engineering 

Carey Croneis Chair in Geology 
■ ■•• . . Craig Francis Cullinan Chair 

G. C. Evans Instructorships in Mathematics 
W. Maurice Ewing Chair in Oceanography 
H ' rt: '.. ,. Laurence H. Favrot Chair in French 

' . 1 " ;, Anna Smith Fine Chair in Judaic Studies 

r. .V.!; fo; ■•' ■>■''•:■ Henry S. Fox, Sr.. Chair in Economics 

:, . Gladys Louise Fox Chair in English 

-, , .... ; , Lena Gohlman Fox Chair in Political Science 
Foyt Family Chair in Engineering 
Gene and Norman Hackerman Chair in Chemistry 
Noah Harding Chairs in Mathematics 
Noah Harding Chair in Computer Science 
Reginald Henry Hargrove Chair in Economics 
A. J. Hartsook Chair in Chemical Engineering 
William Pettus Hobby Chair in American History 
Jesse H. Jones Distinguished Appointments in the Jones School of Administration 
Jesse H. Jones Chair in Management 
Mary Gibbs Jones Chair in History 
' W. M. Keck Foundation Chair in Geophysics 



iaaUTZ 3TA jaA^OHSG'/ J HOT HOITAMflO-li 67 



^ -> 



William Alexander Kirkland Chair in Administration v'V^r^ I 
(Qj-^ _ Ralph and Dorothy Looney Chair ' ji 1 1 ? f 

Edgar Odell Lovett Chair in Mathematics 
c.i.^., Henry R. Luce Chair in Engineering Psychology ' ' .. ' , " -> 

Samuel G. McCann Chair in History 
Carolyn and Fred McManis Chair in Philosophy 
Burton J. and Ann M. McMurtry Chair in the School of Engineering 
Harris Masterson, Jr.. Chair in History 
Andrew W. Mellon Junior Humanities Scholars 
Andrew W. Mellon Chair in the Humanities 
Libbie Sheam Moody Chair in English 
V y. W. L. Moody, Jr., Chair in Mathematics 

Stanley C. Moore Chair in Engineering 
Joseph and Joanna Nazro Mullen Chair in Fine Arts . ___ ._ 

Joseph and Ida Kirkland Mullen Chair in Music 
H. Joe Nelson III Chair in the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration 
George A. Peterkin Chair in Political Economy 

Milton B. Porter Chair in Mathematics '•' ■ - '■-' '■' ^ 

J. Newton Rayzor Chair in Philosophy and Religious Thought 

Lewis B. Ryon Chair in Engineering 
The Schlumberger Chair in Advanced Studies and Research 
Elma Schneider Chair in Music 
Harry K. and Albert K. Smith Chair in Architecture 
Dorothy Richard Starling Chair in Classical Violin '' ' 

; Henry Gardiner Symonds Chair in Administration 

Albert Thomas Chair in Political Science 
-•: Radoslav A. Tsanoff Chair in Public Affairs 

William Gaines Twyman Chair in History 
Isla and Percy Turner Chair in Biblical Studies •' -'■ 

■••• Robert A. Welch Chair in Chemistry 

Harmon Whittington Chair in Administration 
Harry Carothers Wiess Chair in Geology 
Harry Carothers and Olga Keigh Wiess Chair in Natural Sciences '■>'-'' 

'' Sam and Helen Worden Chair in Physics >:svihoh 

'■^i- Gus Sessions Wortham Chair in Architecture '- 

1 Brown Foundation — J. Newton Rayzor Lectures 

Carroll Camden Lectureship in English Literature 
William Wayne Caudill Lecture Series in Architecture 
English Department Distinguished Professor Lectureship 
Joe L. Franklin Lectureship in Physical Chemistry 
, - ' Hanszen College Fund for Aaron Seriff Lectures 

W. V. Houston Lectureship 

Ervin Frederick Kalb Lectureship in History 

Thomas W. Leland Visiting Lectureship in Chemical Engineering 

W. Oscar Neuhaus Memorial Lectures in the Jones School 

The Rockwell Lectures 

The Harold E. and Margaret R. Rorschach Memorial Lectures in Legal History 

Tsanoff Lectureship in the Humanities ^ •).,, ,, ■ , 

Dr. Thomas J. and Jane A. Vanzant Lectureship .,^ ^^ ,. 

Paul C. Wilber Lectureship in Chemical Engineering , " . ? 



68 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Information for 
Undergraduate 
Students 



;i: / -1 .'1 rri; 



Degree Requirements, 
Majors, and Curricula 



All degrees conferred by Rice University, both graduate and undergraduate, are 
awarded solely in recognition of educational attainments, not as warranty of future 
employment or admission to other programs of higher education. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree at Rice is awarded with a designated major in some 
field of architecture, the humanities, music, social sciences, science, engineering, or 
with an interdepartmental major in managerial or policy studies, or with an approved 
area major. The general university requirements for the B.A. degree, as well as the 
options open to students in their choice of majors, are described below. 

Similarly, the Bachelor of Science degree at Rice is awarded with a designated 
major in the various engineering departments. The requirements for this degree, which 
is the ABET accredited degree, are described below. 

The Bachelor of Music, which is offered by the Shepherd School of Music, may 
be taken as a separate undergraduate degree or in conjunction with the Master of Music 
when both are awarded simultaneously on completion of a five-year program of 
professional studies. 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration offers a Master of 
Accounting degree program which may be completed in one year of graduate study if 
students have taken a prescribed set of prerequisite courses by the end of their senior 
year. No specific undergraduate degree is required. 

For students interested in teaching in secondary schools, a program of teacher 
training leading to certification in the State of Texas may be completed together with 
the B.A. degree. This program is administered by the Department of Education. 

Programs that satisfy the requirements for admission to medical, dental, or law 
school are available in conjunction with the various majors. 



If 



I. ;.... , 



vs 



o:TA?/«o^i^r 



69 



Degree Requirements and Majors 

Graduation and University Credit Requirements 

Students completing a Bachelor of Arts degree must pass a minimum of 120 
semester hours. In establishing an undergraduate major for the Bachelor of Arts degree, 
departments must specify a minimum of 1 8 semester hours for majors in the humanities 
and social sciences and a minimum of 24 semester hours for majors in science. No 
department may specify more than 80 semester hours (related laboratories, required 
courses, and prerequisites included). For a Bachelor of Arts degree in any discipline 
other than architecture students must pass a minimum of 60 semester hours in addition 
to major requirements specified by their department. Architecture majors must pass at 
least 38 semester hours in addition to their major requirements. 

To fulfill the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the 
several branches of engineering, with the exception of chemical engineering, students 
must pass no fewer than 1 34 semester hours. Students fulfilling the requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science in chemical engineering must pass up to 137 semester hours, 
depending on accreditation requirements. In establishing a departmental major for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the various branches of engineering, with the 
exception of chemical engineering, no department may specify more than 92 semester 
hours (required courses, prerequisites, and related laboratories included). In establish- 
ing the departmental major for the B.S. in chemical engineering, the department may 
specify no more than the semester hours necessary to meet the requirements of the 
accrediting agency, up to a maximum total of 104 semester hours (required courses, 
prerequisites, and related laboratories included). 

For any bachelor's degree, no fewer than 48 semester hours completed in fulfill- 
ment of the degree requirements must be on an advanced level (numbered 300 or higher) 
and more than 50 percent of these hours must be completed at Rice. Furthermore, 
students must complete more than 50 percent of the advanced level requirements in their 
major field at Rice. Within major requirements, departments may specify that a higher 
proportion of advanced level work must be taken at Rice. 

After students have fulfilled University distribution requirements, the major 
requirements, the physical education requirement, and the English composition require- 
ment, all remaining courses in their degree programs are free electives. Students must 
assume the responsibility for meeting all deadlines and determining if their distribution 
requirements are met. 

Transfer students must be registered at Rice for at least four full semesters during 
the fall and spring terms and must complete not less than 60 semester hours at Rice for 
a Rice degree. 

To be recommended for graduation, all students must complete their degree 
requirements with a minimum GPA of 1 .67 in all Rice courses and a minimum GPA of 
2.00 for those courses presented in fulfillment of their major requirements. 

The Committee on Examinations and Standing reviews student records at the time 
of graduation and recommends to the faculty outstanding students to be granted degrees 
cum laude. magna cum laude, or summa cum laude. 

University Distribution Requirements 

1 . At Rice University undergraduate majors are divided into six divisions: humanities, 
social sciences, natural sciences, engineering, architecture, and music. Humanities 
majors comprise Group I: the social sciences make up Group II; and engineering and 
natural sciences fall under Group III. Music and architecture majors meet unique and 
specific requirements outlined below. Interdepartmental majors except cognitive sci- 
ences have been assigned to one of the three groups for distribution purposes. 



70 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Humanities Majors (Group I) 
Ancient Mediterranean 
Civilizations 
Q Art and Art History i,[^ ^^-jr 
Asian Studies 
Classics 
English 
i^. French 
German 



ilU|>9>it 



Human Performance/ 

Health Sciences 
Medieval Studies 
Philosophy 
Russian 

Religious Studies 
Spanish 
Study of Women and Gender 



Social Science Majors (Group II) 

Anthropology 
»: Economics 

History _ > i.^ n 

>r Linguistics rrsT!) 'jfulhtri/f gJTr 
'>> Managerial Studies 



Natural Science Majors (Group III) 
f Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

Chemical Physics 

Chemistry 

Ecology and Evolutionary 
Biology 



Mathematical Economic 

Analysis 
Policy Studies 
Political Science 
Psychology 
Sociology 



Geology 
Geophysics 
Mathematics 
Physics 



Engineering Majors (Group III) 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Computer Science 
Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 



Environmental Sciences 
Materials Science 
Computational and Applied 

Mathematics 
Mechanical Engineering 
Statistics 



2. Undergraduate students must complete at least 1 2 credit hours in each of the three 
subject groups listed below: 



3o A'^U/njJ 
Group I. 

3. 

<' Group II. 
Group III. 



Literature and language, art and art history, classics, philosophy 

(except logic), religion, music, and humanities. 

Economics, history, political science, anthropology, linguistics, 

psychology, and sociology. 

Biological science, physical science, engineering, mathematics, 

mathematical sciences, logic, statistics, and computer science. 



This requirement is fulfilled by taking Foundation Courses or their equivalents, 
as specified for each major, and other approved courses. 



3. Foundation Courses are offered in each distribution group. They are primarily 
intended to provide a sound basis for completing distribution requirements, but may 
also be explicitly required for completion of some majors. It should be noted that 
directors of the foundation courses are empowered to waive the foundation course 
requirements for individual students. ^' ■' ■- '• ■•■ ~ ■ 

Humanities 101 . 102: These courses will introduce students to disciplines in the 
humanities and arts by studying representative works primarily of Western 
culture from ancient Greece through the modem era. There is no equivalent 
course. 

Social Science 102: This course will offer a broad historical introduction to 
thought about human society. There is no equivalent course. 

Natural Sciences 101, 102: These courses will provide an introduction to the 
principles underlying physics, chemistry and mathematics. The foundational 
requirement in the natural sciences can also be satisfied by: (a) successful 
completion of 3 credit hours of mathematics (MATH 101. 102. Ill or 112), 3 
credit hours of physics (PHYS 101. 102. 121 or 122). and 3 credit hours of 
chemistry (CHEM 101. 102. 1 1 1 or 1 12) or (b) successful completion of 6 credit 
hours each in two of these three areas. - 

4. University Foundation Course Requirements: 

A. Group I majors must complete Natural Science 101. 102 or equivalent. 

B. Group II majors must complete Natural Science 101. 102 or equivalent. 

C. Group III majors must complete Humanities 101. 102 and Social Science 
102. 

D. Architecture majors must complete Humanities 101. 102. Social Science 
102. and Natural Science 101. 102 or equivalents. 

E. Cognitive Sciences majors must complete Humanities 101 and 102. Stu- 
dents who double major in a Group I or Group II major are not required to 
take any foundations courses. 

F. Music majors must complete Humanities 101. 102, Social Science 102, and 
Natural Science 101, 102 or equivalents. 

G. Area majors must be classified as Group I. II or III at the time of approval. 
They are then subject to the foundation course requirements of the assigned 
Group. 

H. A student who double majors in a Group I or II discipline and a Group III 
discipline is not required to take any of the foundation courses. 

I. A student who double majors in Music and a Group I. II or III subject is 
required only to meet the foundation course requirements of the Group I, II 
or III major. 

J. A student who double majors in Architecture and a Group I. II or III subject 
is required only to meet the foundation course requirements of the Group 
I. II or III major. Note, however, that completion of specified Foundation 
Courses may be required for the Architecture major. 



.^ -*-'>t>. -..C^Oi^ ^oi. 



72 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

5. In addition to the foundation courses appropriate to their major, students must 
complete the distribution requirements in each subject group by taking other courses 
which appear on the list ot approved courses m effect at the time of course registration. 
A complete list is published annually m the Schedule of Courses Offered. Copies are 
also available in the Registrar's Office and in the Office of Academic Advising. 

Coherent Minors 

A coherent minor comprises an approved sequence of three or four courses that 
build on the foundation courses and are designed to encourage exploration of a subject 
in depth from a variety of interrelated perspectives that lie outside the division of major 
study. Successful completion of a coherent minor will be noted on a student's 
transcript. Coherent minors are available on an optional basis, subject to the following 
rules. 

A. A student with a major in a Group I or Group II subject may choose a coherent 
minor only from Group III upon successful completion of Natural Sciences 
101-102 or their equivalents. 

B. A student majoring in a Group III subject may choose only a Group I or II 
coherent minor upon successful completion of both Humanities 1 1 - 1 02 and 
Social Sciences 102. 

C. Students majoring in architecture, music, and certain area majors, who are 
required to complete all five foundation courses, may elect a coherent minor 
from Group I, II, or III. 

D. Courses included in the coherent minor will be considered on a course-by- 
course basis for purposes of satisfying distribution requirements. 

E. No courses that are submitted for a coherent minor may be taken on a pass- 
fail basis, and a minimum grade point average of 2.00 must be achieved in 
the courses presented for the coherent minor. 

F. Transfer courses, if their Rice equivalents are among the courses included in 
the coherent minor, may be accepted for the minor, but at least one-half of the 
courses submitted for the minor must be taken at Rice University. 

G. Each coherent minor will be the responsibility of the appropriate academic 
dean, who will be responsible for approving any course substitution which 
he or she deems to be proper in exceptional cases, and for giving official 
verification of a student's satisfactory completion of the requirements of the 

''■ minor. 

H. In order to have the successful completion of a coherent minor noted on the 
student's transcript, the student should obtain a form to verify that comple- 
tion at the Registrars Office. The form must be approved and signed by the 
appropriate dean or designee and returned to the Registrar 's Office by the end 
of the tenth week of ihe last semester in a student's academic career. 






lJ,i 



The current list of coherent minors is given below. New coherent minors are 
proposed from time to time by the faculty , supported by the appropriate dean and given 
final approval by the Provost of the University upon recommendation of the Under- 
graduate Curriculum Committee. The Registrars Office and the Office of Academic 
Advising have updated lists of all approved coherent minors. 



2TViaaUT2 HTAuClAilOHaaHU 5\0H HOITAMHOHMi ^3 

Group I/II Minors: "' " '■ 

Ancient Greece considers the history and cuhure of archaic and classical Greece. 
Three Courses: HIST201 or CLAS 211; one of CLAS 222, CLAS 3 15, CLAS 352; one 
of CLAS 335, CLAS 336, HART 306, PHIL 301 . 

Archaeology provides a foundation of knowledge about ancient peoples and cultures, 
along with the methodological and theoretical approaches through which such 
knowledge is attained. Four Courses: ANTH 205; two of ANTH 211, ANTH 216, 
ANTH 312, ANTH 362; one of RELI 205, HART 305, HART 306, HART 308. 

Asian Studies addresses the historical, religious, and cultural aspects of Buddhism 
and Confucianism. Three Courses: HUMA 211; two of ANTH 353, ANTH 355, 
HART 482 or RELI 322, HIST 250/450. 

Engineering Psychology introduces students to the fundamentals of human informa- 
tion-processing as they affect the design and operation of modem technologies. Four 
Courses: FSYC 101; PSYC 203; PSYC 350 or PSYC 351; PSYC 470. 

Formal Institutions acquaints students with the study of the formal institutions 
society has established to serve its needs. Four Courses: ECON 430 or ECON 436; two 
of POLI 3 1 7, POLI 3 1 8, SOCI 370. 

History of Western Philosophy offers students the opportunity to study and discuss 
critically the classic works of Western philosophy. Three Courses: PHIL 201, PHIL 
202, PHIL 301, PHIL 302, or PHIL 308. 

Imperialism: Ancient and Modern explores the workings of imperial systems in 
different epochs and considers the premises from which history examines them. Four 
Courses: HIST 307 or HIST 282; HIST 410 or HIST 232; HIST 425; HIST 469. 

Interpretive Anthropology involves the translation of the meanings that members of 
societies give to their own institutions into analytic models of how culture shapes 
social action in historical context. Four Courses: ANTH 333; ANTH 336; two of 
ANTH 327, ANTH 340, ANTH 348. ANTH 406. 

Language and Cognition explores the interconnections between language and 
thought from the perspectives of linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and information 
systems. Four Courses: LING 200; one of LING/PHIL 353, LING/ANTH 406, LING/ 
ANTH 411; LING/PS YC 309 or LING 412; LING 306 or LING 315. 

Legal Studies provides a broad exposure to the nature of the contemporary practice of 
the law and to the origins of our legal system. Four Courses: either PHIL 3 1 6 and HIST 
337 or HIST 397 and HIST 398; two of ANTH 326, ECON 438, POLI 321. 

Medieval Studies provides interdisciplinary perspectives on the Medieval world. 
Three Courses: HIST 202; two of ENGL 323 or ENGL 328, HART 319. HIST 337, 
PHIL 201. 

Microeconomic Policy Analysis provides an understanding of the core of economic 
reasoning together with its applications to significant areas of economic life. Four 
Courses: ECON 211; ECON 370 or ECON 372; two of ECON 415, ECON 435, 
ECON 436, ECON 461, ECON 483. 



74 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Modern British and American Literature offers students a survey of major British 
and American writers of the modem period and the opportunity to explore one aspect 
of that literature in greater depth. Three courses: ENGL 252; ENGL 26 1 ; one of ENGL 
363, ENGL 364, ENGL 383, ENGL 384, ENGL 387. 

Modern Germany introduces students to the history, politics, literature and culture 
of Germany in the 20th century. Three Courses: two of GERM 313, GERM 314, 
GERM 376, POLI 360 or HIST 355; one of GERM 361 , GERM 39 1 , HIST 376, PHIL 
308. 

Music Studies offers theoretical discussions and applications which will provide a 
background for music history and literature or for creative work. Three Courses: MUSI 
317; either MUSI 318 and MUSI 328, MUSI 327 and MUSI 328, or MUSI 318 and 
MUSI 307. 

Peace and Conflict Studies introduces students to the causes of conflict, its possible 
positive aspects, and the possibilities for resolving it. Four Courses: POLI 373; POLI 
378; HIST 293 or HIST 294; PHIL 101 or SOCI 411. 

Social Inequality introduces students to major perspectives on social inequality, with 
an emphasis on the distribution of scarce resources. Four Courses: SOCI 301; ECON 
211; ECON 415 or ECON 450; one of HIST 430, POLI 309, SOCI 306, SOCI 309. 

Social Order and Change provides students with a set of conceptual tools with which 
to confront the problems of stability and change in modem societies. Four Courses: 
SOCI 203; three of SOCI 301, SOCI 306, SOCI 311, SOCI 370, SOCI 411. 

Twentieth Century Art: History and Studio offers students exposure to the nature 
of art history and to two different studio courses. Three Courses: ARTS 225; one of 
HART 356, HART 463, HART 475; one of ARTS 205, ARTS 301, ARTS 31 1, ARTS 
365. 

Women's Studies introduces students to the ways in which feminist scholarship has 
served both as cultural critique and as a challenge to traditional disciplines. Three 
Courses: HUMA 270; HIST 244/HIST 344; one of ENGL 304, ENGL 321, ENGL 413, 
HIST 423, HIST 438, HUMA 385, RELI 357, SOCI 306, SOCI 334. 

Group III Minors: 

Earth Systems seeks to promote an understanding of the earth as a single complex 
system in which the atmosphere, the oceans, the crust, and life interact to produce the 
global environment. Three Courses: BIOS 325; GEOL 101 or GEOL 341; SPAC 346 
or SPAC 443. 

Ecosystem Biology examines the biological bases for the complex interactions of 
species within a variety of ecosystems. Three Courses: BIOS 202, BIOS 321; BIOS 
325. 

The Geosciences is concemed with the surface and subsurface features of the earth, 
with humankind's relationship to them, and with the forces that change the earth. 
Three Courses: GEOL 101, GEOL 102, GEOL 202, or GEOL 341. 



I 



2TVI3aiJT^ 3TAUaAHO«3aHU ^0^ V!OiT/>/.>IO^Ml 7^ 

Living Systems offers students a broad view of the range of biological investigation 
into the nature of organisms, from the molecular to the organismic level. Three 
Courses: BIOS 201; BIOS 202; one of BIOS 329, BIOS 336. BIOS 341. BIOS 343. 

Planetary Science compares the earth with other solar planets and the solar system 
with other systems in the universe. Three Courses: GEOL 101. GEOL 2 1 4. SPAC 201 . 

Space Science explores the wide range of objects observed in the universe, the 
methods of studying these objects, and humankind's explorations into space. Three 
Courses: SPAC 201 or SPAC 250: SPAC 202 or SPAC 300 + 330; SPAC 346 or 443. 

Statistical Science provides students with the basic philosophy of modeling real 
world phenomena in the light of data. Three Courses: STAT 300 or STAT 301 ; STAT 
38 1 or STAT 382; one of STAT 339. STAT 400. STAT 429. STAT 480. STAT 495. 

Skills "''■''' -■'■'■-■^ '^ -'■' '^ '■ -■• >..■-■ ■: -- •--•«*»^ 

English Competency Requirement. Every Rice student must demonstrate 
competency in English comprehension and composition. This requirement is satisfied 
by passing the English composition examination administered by the Department of 
English to all entering students during orientation week. Students who fail to pass this 
test are required to enroll in English 1 03. a one-semester course in composition which 
carries both degree and distribution credit. Satisfactory completion of this course then 
fulfills the English competency requirement. 

Physical Education. Each student must pass two semester courses in basic health 
and physical education, although these courses do not count toward the semester hours 
required for a degree. Students with disabilities may satisfy this requirement by taking 
individual instruction or classes arranged specifically to meet their needs. 

uO 

Departmental Majors and Honors Programs '^'^^ 

Students normally designate a major before preliminary registration for the junior 
year and will not be permitted to register for the fall semester of the junior year without 
having declared a major. To assist students with this selection. Majors Day is held each 
spring semester. Departments and preprofessional offices provide information about 
their programs at a central location. Once a student declares a major, the department 
or title of the major is then noted on the student's transcript and a faculty adviser in 
the major department is assigned. Introductory courses taken before formal designa- 
tion of a major may be counted in fulfilling the major requirements. 

In order to receive a bachelor's degree, a student must complete the requirements 
for at least one major. Students declare their major using a form provided by the 
Registrar. The department chair or designee must sign the form acknowledging the 
declaration. It is expected that the department will counsel the student about the 
requirements that must be met and the likelihood the student will be able to meet them. 
If the department believes a student is not well prepared for success in its major, it may 
express its reservations on the form. No department or program may, however, refuse 
to admit an undergraduate as a major, with the exception of the School of Architecture 
and the Shepherd School of Music or in the case of limitations of resources. In such 
cases departments must publish criteria they will use to limit the number of majors 
together with their major requirements. 



76 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Although students normally declare a major by the time of preregistration for the 
spring semester of their sophomore year, they are always free to change departmental 
majors in the junior or senior year, although this may entail one or more additional 
semesters at the University. Area majors are an exception to this rule and must be 
declared by the fourth semester prior to graduation (see Area Majors). Students and 
their advisers should regularly review progress toward their degrees. 

For information on the specific requirements for any departmental major, 
students should consult the departmental listings under Courses of Instruction and 
seek the advice of a faculty member in the department. 

Undergraduate honors programs are open to qualified students, with departmen- 
tal approval, in several departments. Through small classes and seminars, independent 
reading or research projects, and close contact with faculty research, students in an 
honors program may accelerate study in their major fields and, in some cases, enter 
graduate courses. Information on the qualifications for admission and the content of 
honors programs may be found in the departmental listings under Courses of Instruc- 
tion. 



Second Four-year Bachelor's degree 

Both currently enrolled and former Rice students already holding a bachelor's 
degree from Rice may earn a ^fro^^y different four-year bachelor's degree from Rice. 

Students already enrolled at Rice may begin work on a second four-year 
bachelor's degree before completion of the first: 

1. by being accepted for the second major by the major department and 
fulfilling all requirements for the second degree; 

2. by completing a minimum of 30 additional semester hours at Rice beyond the 
hours required for their first degree, to be applied to the second degree. 

Current Rice students seeking admission to this program should apply to the 
Registrar. The application should include a written statement of both proposed majors, 
and a course program for each. This statement should also contain a notation of 
approval from the chairman or undergraduate advisor from each department con- 
cerned, indicating that all major degree requirements will be satisfied with the 
proposed course program. Students holding a bachelor's degree from Rice may earn 
a different four-year bachelor's degree from Rice: 

1. by being accepted for the major by the major department and fulfilling all 
requirements for the second degree; 

2. by completing a minimum of 30 additional semester hours at Rice beyond > 
their first bachelor's degree to be applied to the second degree; 

^ 3. by attending in full-time residence at Rice for at least two semesters during 
'^ the fall or spring terms beyond their first bachelor's degree. 

' For Rice graduates who enroll for a second undergraduate degree, the entire 

undergraduate record continues cumulatively. 

Former Rice students seeking admission to this program should apply to the 
Registrar. The application should include a written statement of the proposed major 
and course program for the second degree, a supporting letter from the chairman of the; 
major department, and an explanation of the student's reasons for seeking a second 
degree. > 

■'.iV ' 



Students with a bachelor's degree from schools other than Rice may earn a four- 
year bachelor's degree in a different major from Rice. 

1 . by being accepted for the major by the major department and fulfilling all 
requirements for the second degree: 

2. by completing a minimum of 60 semester hours at Rice to be applied to their 
Rice degree: 

3. by attending in full-time residence at Rice for at least four semesters during 
the fall or spring term. 

Students with a bachelor's degree from schools other than Rice should apply for 
admission to the Admission Office and will be considered according to the procedures 
and criteria for transfer students. Their application for admission must include all the 
materials listed above for applicants who are former Rice students plus an official 
transcript of the first degree. 

Courses completed at Rice as a Class III student may be applied to a second 
undergraduate degree only on approval by the major department for that degree. 

Information concerning financial aid available to participants in the second 
degree program may be secured from the financial aid office. Students admitted to the 
second degree program may request to be assigned to a College but will have lower 
priority for on-campus housing than students enrolled for a first four-year bachelor's 
program. The expectation is that such space will probably not be available. 



Summer School »- - 5 

Rice Summer School offers a variety of credit programs for Rice students, visiting 
undergraduates, graduate students and Class III students (non-degree graduate 
program). Admission is automatic for any Rice undergraduate or graduate student in 
good standing. Other students will need to send official transcripts (mailed directly 
from their universities and colleges to the School of Continuing Studies) and complete 
an application. Six to eight credit hours is considered a full load. All applicants should 
submit their applications with a $25 fee and a $25 per credit hour deposit by the 
application deadline(earlier for certain courses and trips). Because the Summer 
Program operates on a cost-return basis, it is essential that students apply by the 
deadline. Courses that do not generate an enrollment sufficient to pay costs by the 
deadline may be canceled. Students will have the option of enrolling in another 
comparable course or receiving a refund. Applications will be accepted after the 
deadline, but before the start of classes, with an additional $25 late fee. 

Tuition is $245.00 per semester hour of credit for undergraduate courses ( 100- 
400 level) and $360.00 per semester hour of credit for graduate courses (500-1- level) 
and must be paid before classes begin. The session begins the second week of June for 
most courses. Very limited financial aid is available for Rice students only. Auditing 
is permitted with full payment of tuition and fees. 

For more information, please contact the Rice Summer Program Office at (713) 
520-6022 or 527-4803. 



,-:snihc5n 3lBif:o-:i-- rjonu ■■.Cj\r.<i:V/.:n\ to 



78 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

-' " Areas of Study - < " ^' ' • 

Architecture 

Students interested in architecture may choose from programs leading to either the 
Bachelorof Arts or the Bachelor of Architecture degree. The Bachelor of Arts requires 
four years of study with a major in architecture. Students who have completed or will 
complete the four-year B.A. with a major in architecture may apply for admission to 
the Bachelor of Architecture program. 

Students accepted into the Bachelor of Architecture program in their fifth year are 
assigned to a working preceptorship with an architectural firm and return to Rice to 
complete a sixth year of architectural study for the degree. Further information on 
these programs may be found under Architecture in the Courses of Instruction section. 

Engineering 

The George R. Brown School of Engineering at Rice offers, through its eight 
departments, opportunities for a variety of curriculum and degree choices. Students 
interested in the engineering profession may major in chemical engineering, civil 
engineering, computer science, electrical and computer engineering, mathematical 
sciences, mechanical engineering, materials science and engineering, or statistics for 
both undergraduate and graduate degrees. They may also take a double major 
combining environmental science with another science or engineering field. These 
programs lead to either the B.A. or B.S. degree and may qualify students for further 
study leading to a fifth-year professional master's degree, a Master of Science degree, 
or a Doctor of Philosophy degree. 

During the first two years, engineering students should consult with the chairs of 
the departments of interest or with the special first and second-year advisers appointed 
by each department for information and advice about details of the programs and 
choice of electives and about engineering as a profession. 

Degree requirements and recommended programs of study are listed under the 
individual departments. 

Humanities 

In the School of Humanities, majors are offered in art and art history, classics, 
English, French, German, health and physical education, history, linguistics, philoso- 
phy, religious studies, Russian, and Spanish. 

An interdepartmental major in policy studies, which combines courses from the 
School of Humanities and the School of Social Sciences, is described on pages xx-xx. 

The requirements of each major may be found in the departmental listings under 
Courses of Instruction and are also available from the department chair and from the 
Registrar's Office. 

The Introduction to Humanities Foundation course and the Joint Venture Pro- 
gram, sponsored by the Career Services Center, are also described in the Courses of 
Instruction under the heading Humanities, together with other Humanities listings. 

Interdisciplinary majors in Ancient Mediterranean Civilization. Asian Studies. 
Medieval Studies and The Study of Women and Gender are described in the courses 
of instruction under separate headings. 



8TH3GIJT2 3TAUGA>iO«3G'v^U 'AOH >10!T/.M5T03V?I f^ 

Music 

The Shepherd School of Music offers four degrees: the Bachelor of Arts degree 
in music; the Bachelor of Music degree in performance, composition, music history, 
and music theory; the Master of Music degree in performance, composition, choral 
and instrumental conducting, musicology and music theory; and the Doctor of Musical 
Arts degree in composition and selected areas of performance. Normally, four years 
are required for the bachelor's degrees and two years for the master's. Qualified 
students may elect an honors program that leads to the simultaneous awarding of the 
Bachelor of Music and Master of Music degrees after five years of study. The final two 
years of the B.Mus./M.Mus. program are devoted to specialization and can be entered 
only upon passing qualifying examinations administered in the fifth or sixth semester. 

More detailed information about the Shepherd School and the requirements for 
degrees is given under Music in the Courses of Instruction section of this catalog. 

Natural Sciences 

The Wiess School of Natural Sciences comprises the Departments of Biochem- 
istry and Cell Biology, Chemistry, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Geology and 
Geophysics, Mathematics, Physics, and Space Physics and Astronomy. All but the 
Space Physics and Astronomy Department offer programs leading to the B. A. degree. 
Students may also elect double majors combining one of the programs in natural 
sciences with another science, the humanities, or an engineering field. The require- 
ments for each major may be found in the departmental listings under Courses of 
Instruction, and are also available from the department chair and from the Registrar's 
Office. 



Social Sciences :^, 

The School of Social Sciences offers majors in anthropology, economics, 
mathematical economic analysis, political science, psychology, and sociology. 

The interdepartmental major policy studies overlaps the School of Social Sci- 
ences, the School of Engineering, and the School of Humanities. The managerial 
studies major overlaps the School of Social Sciences, the Jones School, and the School 
of Engineering. 

The cognitive sciences major overlaps the School of Social Sciences, the School 
of Humanities, and the School of Engineering. 

The requirements of each major may be found in the departmental and interde- 
partmental major listings under Courses of Instruction and are also available from the 
department chair and from the Registrar" s Office. 



Other Options for Undergraduate Majors 

deciding on a major, students are encouraged to select a course of study 
ci rected toward their personal goals. Several options are available besides the normal 
r.iajor in most departments. Further information on these may be found in the 
depiirimental listings. 



80 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

1. Areas of concentration within departmental majors. Certain majors, in- 
cluding architecture, electrical engineering, German, human performance, 
physics, and Spanish, but not limited to these, have a choice of different areas 
of concentration with different course requirements within the department 
major. 

2. Double or triple majors that fulfill the major requirements of two or three 
departments. The majors may, but need not, be in related fields: for example, 
computer science/math science or biology/English. 

3. Interdepartmental majors. Interdepartmental majors combine courses 
taught by faculty from more than one department. A list of these majors is 
provided in the table located near the end of this section on Curricula and 
Degrees. 

4. Area majors. Instead of selecting an established departmental major or 
program, students have the option of developing an area major which is 
closer to their particular interests and career goals if the academic resources 
are available at Rice. Whereas double majors must conform to the require- 
ments of both departments, an area major is a single major that combines 
courses from two or more departments and forms a clearly coherent program 
with its own major requirements. An area major must be distinct from other 
majors offered at Rice and is not to be taken as a double major along with an 
established major. Students who elect to take an area major must also 
conform to all other University graduation requirements. 

An area major is normally initiated by the student and is worked out in 
conjunction with advisers in the Office of Academic Advising and faculty 
advisers from each of the departments involved. Together they design a 
comprehensive and substantial course of study, decide on an appropriate 
title, and indicate their approval with signatures. Final approval of the plan 
' "" i must be granted by the chairs of the involved departments and the Under- 

graduate Curriculum Committee. 

After approval has been secured, the Office of Academic Advising 
officially certifies the approved major plan to the Registrar and oversees the 
major on behalf of the faculty advisers. Any change in the proposed 
requirements requires the approval of the faculty advisers and the Under- 
graduate Curriculum Committee. 

Students who might want to develop an area major but are uncertain 
which departments to approach should consult with the Office of Academic 
Advising during the sophomore year. Area majors may not be formulated and 
approved within three semesters of graduation other than in exceptional 
circumstances which would be determined by the Committee on Examina- 
tions and Standing. Under no circumstances may an area major be declared 
in the final semester before graduation. 

All applications for area majors must be certified by the Office of Academic 
Advising before they are accepted by the Registrar. Normally, a student who 
chooses an area major may not double major in any other major. 



Premedical, Prelaw, and Prebusiness Programs 

In addition to the preprofessional and professional programs offered by Rice in 
accounting, architecture, business administration, engineering, public and nonprofit 
management, and music, a student may pursue a program which will satisfy the 
requirements for admission to graduate professional schools in business, dentistry, 
diplomacy and foreign affairs, health science, law, or medicine. 

The health professions adviser counsels students interested in premedical or 
predental studies and other professional programs in the health sciences. Those 
interested in prelegal studies should consult the prelaw adviser. Information about a 
career in business, finance, or accounting can be obtained from the prebusiness 
adviser. These advisers may be contacted through their offices in the Ley Student 
Center. 

Students who plan to enter medical school or other professional or graduate 
school at the end of their junior year at Rice can arrange to receive a Rice four-year 
bachelor's degree by submitting to the Committee on Examinations and Standing a 
degree plan which fulfills all normal University and departmental requirements for the 
bachelor's degree. The degree plan must be submitted before students begin their 
graduate or professional training. Transfer credit for courses not to exceed the 
equivalent of ten courses of three or four semester hours are accepted if the individual 
courses are acceptable to the student's major department and the registrar according 
to normal procedures. Students who have entered Rice after their first year must 
complete the minimum residence and course requirements for transfer students before 
leaving. The Committee on Examinations and Standing reviews the degree plan 
submitted by each student and gives final approval of the student's admission to the 
program. In addition, business schools have begun to attach importance to coursework 
in calculus. 

Premedical and Predental Programs. The entrance requirements for medical 
and dental colleges of the United States are limited to relatively few courses: one year 
each of general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics, mathematics, biology, and 
English and laboratories required by the foregoing science courses. Because medical 
and dental schools show little or no preference for any one major, students planning 
a medical or dental career have the opportunity to choose their major on the basis of 
their interests and capabilities. They should keep two objectives in mind: ( 1 ) to secure 
a broadly based cultural background and (2) to master the necessary skills for an 
alternative career. Those who elect to concentrate in the sciences or engineering will 
automatically satisfy most of the entrance requirements. Students concentratmg in the 
humanities need to make some adjustments in their study plan in order to fulfill the 
entrance requirements. Premedical and predental students are advised to discuss their 
plans with the health professions adviser. 

Prelaw Studies. The academic requirement for admission to law school is 
satisfied by all degree programs offered at Rice. While many students major in history, 
political science, or economics, as a base for prelaw studies, no law school specifies 
particular courses or curricula as prerequisite to admission. Most require only a 
baccalaureate degree and the Law School Admission Test. 



82 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

The Official Guide to U.S. Law Schools, published by the Law School Admission 
Council/Law School Admission Services in cooperation with the American Bar 
Association and the Association of American Law Schools, states that prelegal 
education should develop oral and written comprehension and expression as well as 
creative thinking and critical understanding of human values and that no one discipline 
is uniquely concerned with those objectives. Therefore, prelaw students should strive 
for development of their own capabilities within the areas of their greatest interest. 
Although there is no required course of study for the student interested in a legal career, 
the prelaw adviser recommends expository writing courses and beginning accounting 
and economics courses as useful to any law student. 

Interested students should contact the prelaw adviser early, preferably in their 
first year at Rice. The official guide, reference books, and catalogs of many leading 
law schools are available in the prelaw office in the Ley Student Center. Prelaw 
students are encouraged to discuss their plans with the prelaw adviser. 

Prebusiness Studies. Graduate business schools consider a variety of attributes 
when admitting students to their Master of Business Administration (MBA) pro- 
grams: 

1 . Scholastic aptitude, as evidenced by undergraduate grades and the score on 
the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT), 

2. extracurricular activities, 
' 3. work experience, and 

4. ability to communicate effectively both in writing and orally. 

No one undergraduate major is favored over another. Students intending to study 
accounting or business administration at the graduate level are advised to select an 
undergraduate major (or majors) in which their academic performance is likely to be 
the strongest. 

Regardless of one " s undergraduate major, it would be wise to take Economics 2 1 1 
and 212 and Accounting 305 as background courses. Since many major business 
schools prefer students who have relevant full-time experience, these courses will 
assist graduating seniors in obtaining employment in the private or public sector. 

Students who are considering application to a graduate business school are 
encouraged to consult the prebusiness adviser early in their undergraduate years. 
Graduate business schools differ in their objectives, curricula, teaching methods, job 
placement possibilities, and admission standards, and prospective applicants should 
endeavor to become versed in the programs of different schools before beginning the 
application process. The prebusiness adviser can also suggest the kinds of work 
experience which graduate business schools find to be the most useful for prospective 
students. 

Inuring their senior year, undergraduates may apply for the one-year Master ot 
Accounting program offered b\ the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration, 
in order to be eligible for the program, students must have taken the following 
prerequisites as undergraduates: 6 hours of economics. 6 hours of psychology (which 
nust include 3 hours of industrial and organizational psychology). 3 hours of applied 
^ tatistics 3 hours of operations research. 3 hours of financial accounting, and 3 hours 
I if managerial accounting. In addition, courses in corporate finance and intermediate 
nicroeconomics are recommended, but not required. No specific undergraduate major 
s required for entrance into the program. 



• ' ■- \.. . ■ y 83 

Reserve Officers' Training Corps Programs 

Rice University hosts a Naval Reserve Officers' Training Corps program. 
Students may participate in Army ROTC through a cross-enrollment program with the 
University of Houston. These programs seek to train college students so that upon 
graduation they may qualify as commissioned officers in a component of the United 
States Army. Navy or Marine Corps. The Navy has two categories of midshipmen, one 
working toward a Reserve commission and the other toward a regular commission. 
The Army normally awards Reserve commissions; however, certain selected distin- 
guished military students may be offered commissions in the regular Army. 

Any student suspended by the University for academic failure or other cause is 
immediately discharged from the ROTC programs. Any student performing unsatis- 
factory work in military science or naval science courses or lacking satisfactory officer- 
like qualities may be discharged from the ROTC programs regardless of the quality of 
academic work. Enrollment in the ROTC programs at Rice University is normally 
made at the beginning of the fall term. Courses in naval science and military science 
are open to all students. These courses may be counted as free electives toward 
satisfying degree requirements, but they may not be used to satisfy any distribution 
requirements or departmental major requirements. The amount of credit assigned to 
each course is determined by the Provost, in consultation with the Committee on the 
Undergraduate Curriculum. All such courses shall, however, count toward the 
determination of probation, suspension, course load, and grade point average. 

Additional information regarding the ROTC programs and available scholarships 
is given under Military Science and Naval Science in the Courses of Instruction 
section of this catalog. 

Teacher Certification 

Programs of study are offered to fulfill the Texas state requirements for teaching 
certificates on the secondary level in art. biology, chemistry, computer science, earth 
science, economics, English, French, German, health education, history. Latin, math- 
ematics or mathematical sciences, physical education, physics, political science, 
psychology, Russian, general science, social studies, sociology, and Spanish. See 
Education Department (p. 280 ) for information on undergraduate and master's level 
teacher certification programs. 



84 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



School 
Department 



Degrees Offered 



;nti'tto,.-\ Additional Options. Areas of 
Concentration (within majors) 



WIESS SCHOOL OF NATURAL SCIENCES 

Biochemistry and B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 

Cell Biology 



Integrated bio.sciences curriculum with 
undergraduate major in biochemi.stry or 
biology. Specialization in biochemistry, 
biophysical chemistry, molecular biophysics, 
molecular biology, genetics, cell biology, 
neurobiology, and developmental biology 



Chemistry 



B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 



Chemistry; organic chemistry, physical 
chemistry, inorganic chemistry; chemical 
physics 



Ecology and B.A. MA,. Ph.D. 

Evolutionary Biology 



Integrated biosciences curriculum w ith 
undergraduate major in biology or 
biochemistry. Specialization in ecology, 
animal behavior, evolutionary biology, 
molecular population genetics and 
systematics. plant biology, biogeochemistrv 



Geology and 
Geophysics 



.Mathematics 



B.A. in Geology; Stratigraphy, sedimentation, sedimentary 

B.A. in Geophysics; petrology, marine geology-oceanography. 

MA. Ph.D. carbonate petrology. Igneous petrology. 

geochemistry, meteoritics. structural geology. 
SSt-tOO'-/ regional tectonics, rock mechanics, reflection 

and crustal seismology, and geodynamics. 



B.A.. MA, Ph.D. 



"1£ 



Complex analysis, partial differential 
equations, mathematical physics, differential 
geometry. Lie groups, topological dynamics, 
ergodic theory, geometric topology, algebraic 
topology, global analysis, and harmonic 
analysis 



Physics 



B.A..M.A., Ph.D. 



B.A. options: Physics, applied physics, 
biophysics, chemical physics, and space 
physics and astronomy. M.A. and Ph.D. areas: 
Atomic, molecular, and laser physics, 
biophysics, condensed matter and surface 
physics, nuclear and particle physics, 
theoretical physics, and astrophysics. 



Space Physics and 
Astronomy 



M.S.. Ph.D. (For B.A. see 
Physics Department, 
space physics option) 



Optical, UV and gamma-ray astronomy; 
theoretical astrophysics and space plasma 
physics; Earth systems science; spacecraft 
development and data analysis; Laboratory 
atomic and molecular physics. 





■SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Anthropology B.A., M.A.. Ph.D. 


Economics 


B.A. in Mathematical 
Economic Analysis, M.A.. 
Ph.D. 


Economics 


Political Science 


B.A., MA, Ph.D. 




Psychology 


B.A. MA, Ph.D. 




Sociology 


B.A 





85 



GEORGE R. BROWN 

Chemical Engineering 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

B.A., B.S., M.Ch.E., M.S., Biochemical, biomedical engineering; polymer 



Ph.D. 



science: chemical reaction engineering, 
interfacial phenomena, process control, 
thermodynamics, transport phenomena, 
heterogeneous catalysis, flow and transport in 
oil recovery and ground water cleanup 



Civil Engineering 



B.A., B.S.. M.C.E., M.S.. 
Ph.D. 



Structural analysis and design, structural 
mechanics, environmental engineering 



Computer Science 



B.A.,M.C.S„ M.S., Ph.D. 



Compiler construction, parallel computing, 
programming languages, programming 
environments, distributed systems, operating 
systems, complexity theory, algorithms, 
graphics 



Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 

Environmental Science 
and Engineering 



B.A., B.S., M.E.E., M.S., Bioengineering, circuits, control and 
Ph.D. communications systems, robotics, computer 

engineering, lasers, and solid-state electronics 



M.E.E., M.E.S.. M.S.. 
Ph.D. (For B.A. as double 
major see department; B.S 
see Civil Engineering and 



Biological, physical, and chemical treatment 
processes; hydrology and water quality 
modeling; water resources management; 
aquatic biology; inorganic and organic 
chemistry; atmospheric physics; physical- 
chemical processes, water treatment, 
membrane filtration 



Mathematical Sciences B.A., M.A.. Master in 

Applied Mathematical 
Sciences, Ph.D. 



Computational science, numerical analysis, 

operations 

research, physical mathematics, applied 

probability, optimization 



Mechanical Engineering B.A., B.S., M.M.E., 
and Materials Science M.M.S., M.S., Ph.D. 



Computer applications, thermal sciences and 
energy conversion, gas dynamics, fluid 
mechanics, stress analysis and mechanical 
behavior of materials, aerospace engineering, 
material structures 



Statistics 



B.A.. M.Stat., M.A.. Ph.D. 



Data analysis, biomathematics, statistical 
computing, time series analysis, quality 
control, nonparametric function estimation, 
model building. 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

B.A., B.Arch., M.Arch.,. 
M.Arch in Urban Design, 
D.Arch 



SHEPHERD SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

B.A, B.Mus., B.Mus./ 
M.Mus. simultaneously, 
M.Mus., DMA. 



Composition, conducting, music history, 
performance, theory 



JESSE H. JONES GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ADMINISTRATION 



Master of Business 
Administration. 
Master of Accounting 
(For B.A. see 
mangerial stusies. 
M.Acco. degree may be 
earned in one year if a 
specific set of prerequisites 
is taken as an undergraduate.) 



Accounting, business entrepreneurship, 

finance, management information systems, 

finance, management information 

systems, international 

management. 

marketing operations researchand public and 

nonprofit management 



86 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES 

Art and Art History B.A., B.F.A.. M.A. 


Art history, studio art. archaeology, film and 
photography 


Education 


Master of Arts in 
Teaching 


Teacher preparatory programs in 28 subject 
areas 


English 


B.A.,M.A.. Ph.D. 




French and 
Italian 


B.A.. M.A. .Ph.D. 

None 




German and 
Slavic Studies 


B.A.. M.A.. Ph.D. 
B.A. 





Human Performance 
and Health Sciences 



B.A. 



Spanish 
Portuguese and 
Classics 



B.A. M.A. 

None 

B.A. 



Physical education; sport science, sport 
medicine, sport management, teaching, 
coaching; health education as teaching field 
only 



History 


B.A. 


. M.A., 


, Ph.D. 




Linguistics 


B.A., 


, Ph.D. 




Anthropological, English, Germanic, and 
Romance linguistics: semiotics, cognitive and 








computational linguistics 


Philosophy 


B.A. 


. M.A., 


Ph.D. 




Religious Studies 


B.A., 


, M.A., 


Ph.D. 





Language and literature, language, 
Latin American studies 



INTERDEPARTMENTAL MAJORS 

Area Majors B.A. 



Two or more departments and the Office of 
Academic Advising 



Ancient B.A. 

Mediterranean '^'-'^'V'J^- 
Civilization _. . 



Anthropology, art and art history, classics, 
history, philosophy, political science, 
religious studies. 



Asian Studies ■■/'"^■•' B.A. 
;i .>t'.'.;if.r.- 



.^fiibliud bbom 



Anthropology, art and art history, history, 
humanities, linguistics and semiotics, 
languages (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, 
Sanskrit), political science, religious studies 



Chemical Physics 



Managerial Studies 



B.A. 



Chemistry, physics 



Cognitive Sciences B.A. Anthropology, computer science, electrical 

•" '" "' "i"' ■"' engineering, linguistics, philosophy, 

. psychology, statistics 



B.A. M.Acco. degree 
may be earned in one 
year if a specific set of 
prerequisites is taken as 
an undergraduate, (see 
Accounting and Adminis 
Science). 



Accounting, computer science, economics, 
mathematical sciences, political 
science, psychology, statistics 



Medieval Studies 



B.A. 



Art and art history, classics. English. French 
German, history, humanities, linguistics and 
semiotics, music, philosophy, political 
science, religious studies 



Policy Studies B.A. 



Anthropology, economics, history, 
mathematical sciences, philosophy, political 
science, psychology, sociology, statistics 



Study of Women and Gender B.A. 



Anthropology, English, French Studies, 
German, History, Linguistics. Music, 
Philosophy, Religious Studies, Sociology 



Foreign Study Programs and Programs with Other Universities 

Institute of European Studies/Institute for Asian Studies 

Rice is an affiliate university of the Institute for European Studies/Institute for 
Asian Studies, a system of centers abroad located in Durham, Freiburg, London, 
Madrid, Milan, Nantes, Paris, Vienna, Singapore, Southeast Asia, Tokyo, Taiwan, 
Beijing, Nagoya, and the USSR. Each center offers a variety of opportunities to 
complement Rice major programs or to develop new interests. In most cases, the 
institute center is associated with a host university, and students may take a combina- 
tion of courses offered by both the center and the university. Counselors and faculty 
from lES/IAS and the host university advise students in the selection of appropriate 
courses, facilitate registration at the university, arrange for university examinations, 
and provide transcripts to Rice. Students considering foreign study should arrange for 
prior approval of transfer credit through the academic department(s) involved and the 
Registrar. 

Butler University Institute for Study Abroad 

An affiliation between Rice and Butler University Institute for Study Abroad 
enables Rice students to enroll directly in 19 universities in England and Scotland and 
1 5 universities in Australia, either for the full academic year or for a one- or two-term 
stay. The universities in Great Britain include a wide array of schools, both in and out 
of London; the universities in the Pacific Rim include the Universities of Melbome, 
Sydney, and Auckland. Butler University Institute for Study Abroad also sponsors 
one- or two-semester thematic INSTEP programs that concentrate on Politics and Law 
(London), Politics and Strategic Studies (London), and Advanced Economics (Cam- 
bridge). The INSTEP program also provides for optional internships with financial 
institutions in the City of London at the end of the spring term. 

Interested undergraduates may obtain brochures, applications, and information 
about transfer of credit for the Butler programs in the Office of Academic Advising. 

Beaver College Center for Education Abroad 

Rice is also affiliated with Beaver College Center for Education Abroad, which 
provides direct access to over 30 United Kingdom universities, among them various 
branches of the University of London, University of Bristol, University of Edinburgh, 
and Trinity University, Dublin. Beaver College also maintains centers in Vienna and 
Athens. These universities and programs offer courses of study for Rice students with 
majors in science, engineering, the humanities, and the social sciences. Prior approval 
for transfer credit should be arranged through the academic department(s) and the 
Registrar. Further information is available in the Office of Academic Advising. 

Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome 

Another consortial affiliation provided to enhance the Rice undergraduate expe- 
rience is one centered in Rome, focusing on classical studies. Operated through 
Stanford University's Overseas Studies, this semester or year-long program offers 
undergraduate courses in Greek and Latin literature, ancient history and archaeology. 



88 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

and ancient art., taught by European and American professors. Majors in Ancient 
Mediterranean Civilization are particularly encouraged to avail themselves of this 
program, although other juniors or seniors majoring in art history or classics would 
benefit, as well. Additional information on this and other foreign programs may be 
obtained in the Office of Academic Advising. 

C. D. Broad Exchange Program with Trinity College, Cambridge 

This exchange program sponsored by the Student Aid Foundation Enterprises 
involves both students and faculty from Rice and Trinity College, Cambridge. Student 
participation, available through receipt of a competitive award, confers one year of 
study as a visiting student at Rice or at Trinity College in alternate years. Similar but 
shorter exchanges of Rice and Trinity faculty members will also be arranged through 
the program. The provost will appoint the Rice faculty member for the exchange 
program. 

Further information on the program may be obtained from the Office of Academic 
Advising. 

Rice-University of Lancaster Exchange Program 

Rice sophomores majoring or minoring in Economics and/or Managerial Studies 
and maintaining a minimum GPA of 2.5 may qualify for an exchange program with 
the University of Lancaster, a notable British university located in northwestern 
England, just south of the Lake District. Applications should be submitted to the Office 
of Academic Advising early in the spring semester prior to the school year spent 
abroad; finalists will be selected from among the applicants by the faculty of the 
Department of Economics, in consultation with the Office of Academic Advising. 
Although recipients should enroll in at least one Economics course while at the 
University of Lancaster, they may choose from a wide range of other courses, as well. 

The Rice-Lancaster exchange occurs on a one-for-one basis, and each student 
pays tuition, room, and board to his or her home institution. The program must be 
undertaken for a full academic year. 

Rice-University of Wiirzburg Exchange Program 

Through an agreement between the Physics and Electrical and Computer Engi- 
neering Departments at Rice and the University of Wiirzburg, West Germany, 
undergraduates with a concentration in physics or electrical engineering may partici- 
pate in a year-long exchange between the two schools. The exchange program at 
Wiirzburg includes an intensive German-language course taught in Germany prior to 
the fall term. To be eligible. Rice students must have completed at least two years of 
college-level German or the equivalent and must be selected through an application 
process in spring of the year prior to the exchange. Courses of study, usually fourth- 
year undergraduate level, must be arranged on an individual basis with advisors in the 
Physics and Electrical and Computer Engineering Departments. 

Applicants are generally named on a one-for-one basis of exchange. Each student 
must cover tuition costs at his or her home institution, to be applied to the exchange 
partner; other costs must be borne by the individual. Applications and general 
information about this exchange may be obtained in the Office of Academic Advising 
and in the Physics Department. 



'■■■-■' 89 

Exchange Program with Federation of German-American Clubs 

Students at Rice with a firm grounding in the German language, both written and 
spoken, are eligible to compete for an exchange program co-sponsored by the 
Federation of German- American Clubs and Rice. Applications may be obtained from 
the Office of Academic Advising and should be completed by mid-March. Selection 
of Rice finalists is made by the faculty of the Department of German and Slavic Studies, 
in cooperation with the Office of Academic Advising. The number of Rice finalists is 
usually limited to one or two a year, based on an even exchange with German students. 

This ten-month program provides for the Rice student's enrollment at one of 
eighteen outstanding German universities, professional schools, or technical schools, 
depending on individual qualifications and field of study. The Federation of German- 
American Clubs makes the university assignment, based on a priority ranking by the 
applicant. The Clubs also host several weekend gatherings in different parts of 
Germany throughout the year abroad and assign a host family. 

Rice participants pay tuition, room, and board to Rice to be applied to their 
counterpart " s credit; they are supplied with tuition payment and a stipend to cover room 
and board while in Germany. 

Rice-Swarthmore Exchange Program 

An exchange program exists between Rice and Swarthmore College for qualified 
students in the fall semester of their sophomore, junior or senior year. Swarthmore. 
which is situated on a wooded campus near Philadelphia, is a nondenominational 
coeducational college with academic standards similar to those at Rice. The exchange 
is for the fall semester only. Rice students apply in January by submitting their own 
letter of application and two supporting letters from faculty members. The exchange 
is on a one-for-one basis with each student continuing to pay all charges and fees to 
his or her home school. 

Prior approval of transfer credit should be requested for each course from the 
Registrar. Courses to be taken at Swarthmore which will apply to the student's major 
must also be approved by the department. Students who enroll in the normal program 
of four four-semester-hour courses at Swarthmore receive upon satisfactory comple- 
tion 16 hours (or five courses) toward their Rice degree with a notation of specific 
courses which may count for fulfillment of major requirements or distribution within 
that block credit. Further information on this program may be obtained from the Office 
of Academic Advising. 

Sweet Briar Junior Year in France Program 

Established in 1 948. the Sweet Briar Junior Year in France Program provides an 
opportunity for students from colleges and universities in the United States and 
Canada to spend a year studying at four universities and other institutions of higher 
education in Paris following a four-week orientation period in Tours. While some 
students in this program major in French, many others specialize in such areas as art 
and art history, comparative literature, government, history, international relations, 
mathematics, music, philosophy, political science, religion, theatre arts. etc. Students 
are encouraged to experience French culture by living with families in both Tours and 
Paris. Application materials may be obtained in the French Department or the Office 
of Academic Advising. 



90 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
Denmark's International Study Program ' ' "^ r" ' v™ 

DIS offers full-year, semester, and summer programs in Copenhagen, established 
under the Danish Ministry of Education and the University of Copenhagen. Academic 
offerings focus on liberal arts, international business, and architecture and design and 
include study tours to the USSR, eastern, and western Europe. Prior knowledge of the 
Danish language is not required. Further information and applications are available in 
the Office of Academic Advising. 

Sea Education Association 

Rice University's affiliation with SEA enables students to spend a Sea Semester 
concentrating their studies on deep water oceanography. Half the period of time is 
spent in laboratories at Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and the other portion aboard a 
sailing vessel in the Caribbean, conducting research. Through another option. Mari- 
time Semester, students may study the development of maritime cultures and com- 
merce in New England and Canada while operating a sailing vessel off the North 
American coastline. . . ' 



Academic Regulations 



All undergraduate students are subject to the academic regulations of the 
University. Students are responsible for making certain that all departmental and 
university requirements are met. Students are responsible for meeting all academic 
deadlines. The Committee on Examinations and Standing administers the rules 
described below. Under unusual circumstances any student may submit a written 
petition to the committee requesting special consideration. All correspondence with 
the committee should be addressed in care of the Vice-President for Student Affairs. 



Registration 

Currently enrolled students preregister in April for the fall semester and in 
November for the spring semester and complete registration at the beginning of each 
semester. Entering students complete their registration during Orientation for New 
Students the week before classes begin in August. New students must complete, sign, 
and return a matriculation card in order to be properly registered. 

Unless a special tuition plan has been elected, all tuition and fees for the fall 
semester must be paid by the middle of August and for the spring semester by the end 
of December. 

A student who does not register or request from the Registrar a delay of the 
deadline established by the Academic Calendar is considered withdrawn from the 
University by default. To be readmitted, the student must be eligible to continue and 
must pay a late registration fee. The fee is $ 1 5 until the third week of the semester and 
$25 in the fourth week. No student is allowed to register after the fourth week of 
classes except with approval from the Committee on Examinations and Standing or 
the Vice President for Student Affairs for good reason shown. If approved, a late fee 
of $35 is assessed. 



..'--. >rr^ ^'., iw.:-- ■■ ■ ^:- .■■■ ■ 91 

Students may change their registration by adding or dropping courses according 
to the proper procedure during the first two weeks of the semester without penalty fee. 
From the end of the second week to the end of the fourth week the student must obtain 
the instructor's permission to add a course. The deadline for adding courses is the end 
of the fourth week and the deadline for dropping courses is the end of the tenth week 
of the semester. Courses in which loss of credit has been assessed by the Honor Council 
may not be dropped. Students who add or drop courses after the second week but 
before the above deadlines will be charged for each drop/add form submitted 
according to the following schedule: 



Week 1 





Week 2 





Week 3 


$3 


Week 4 


$4 


Week 5 


$5 



Week 6 


$6 


Week 7 


$7 


Week 8 


$8 


Week 9 


$9 


Week 10 


$10 



No course changes may be made after the tenth week without approval of the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing. If approved, such changes are subject to 
a $ 1 5 fee. If the change is necessary because of a revision or cancellation of the course 
by the department, no penalty fee will be charged. 

Students will not be permitted to pre-register for the fall semester of their junior 
year or register for that semester until they have declared a major. 



Course Programs 

Students at Rice normally enroll in 1 5 to 1 7 semester hours each semester and thus 
in eight semesters complete the requirements for graduation in their major. Students 
who wish to register for more than 20 semester hours, or to enroll or continue in fewer 
than 1 2 hours, or to register simultaneously for credit at another university, must secure 
permission from the Vice-President for Student Affairs before filing their registra- 
tions. No student may receive credit for more than 20 semester hours in a semester, 
including courses taken elsewhere, unless he or she has received this prior written 
approval. 

Students are prohibited from registering for more than one course at the same 
hour, unless they receive permission from the instructors involved. 



Transfer Credit Including Credit for 
Summer School Courses Not Taken at Rice 

The basis for approval of transfer credit toward a Rice undergraduate degree for 
courses taken at another college or university is that they are appropriate to the Rice 
curriculum. This credit is normally given to courses whose content is such that they 
are or could be appropriately offered at Rice. The courses must be taken at an academic 
institution accredited by a regional accrediting agency, and the grade earned must be 
C- or better (for that reason students may not take courses P/F or similar basis at other 
institutions). 



92 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

The Registrar in conjunction with the academic departments determines whether 
courses are appropriate for transfer to Rice. The departments may place restrictions 
on particular courses and/or institutions in addition to the restrictions stated above. 
There are also limits on the amounts of transfer credit that may be applied to the various 
Rice majors and degree programs, noted elsewhere in this publication. In particular, 
no more than 14 semester hours of transfer credit taken in summer schools other than 
Rice may be applied to any Rice degree. 

Because of these restrictions, students are strongly advised to seek prior approval 
from the Registrar before taking courses elsewhere. The Registrar may require the 
student to secure approval from the department in case of courses in the student's major 
or for highly specialized courses. Without prior approval, students cannot be assured 
that credit taken at another institution will be transferred. 

If approved, the equivalent Rice course will be entered on the student's record 
only after an official transcript is received by the Registrar. No grade is entered. Credit 
is generally determined on a pro rata basis. Transferred courses have no effect on the 
Rice GPA. All requirements satisfied by the equivalent Rice course are satisfied by 
the transferred course. 



Final Examinations 

Final examinations are given in most courses, but the decision to give a final 
examination as a required part of the course rests with the instructor and the 
department. 

Final examinations that cover more than the material since the last examination, 
that are the only exam in the course, or that are comprehensive of the entire course may 
be given only during the final examination period. Such examinations may not, for 
example, be labeled "tests" and administered during the last week of classes. 

Final examinations are normally of three hours duration. Faculty who. under 
exceptional circumstances, wish to give longer examinations can do so only if the 
exam is scheduled as take-home. Under no circumstances may final exams exceed five 
hours. The "due date" for all take-home final exams is the end of the examination 
period. 

The Committee on Examinations and Standing also recommends that hour exams 
not be given in the final week of classes in those courses in which a final is given. 

All tests and examinations are conducted under the honor system. 

University-sponsored events at which student attendance is required may be 
scheduled in or outside of Houston during the period from Monday through Saturday 
during the last week of classes, so long as no more than one day of classes and one night 
would be spent out of Houston from the previous Sunday night through Friday 
afternoon. Events scheduled on Saturday may involve travel on Friday evening and on 
Sunday. However, no events may be scheduled on Sunday and thereafter until the 
conclusion of the final examination period. Exceptions may be authorized only by the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing. 



The Pass-Fail Option 

An undergraduate student may register for courses on a pass/fail basis subject to 
the following limitations: 

1. The total number of pass/fail courses taken as an undergraduate shall not 
., ,, exceed one for each full year of residence up to a limit of four. Students 

participating in off-campus programs administered through Rice will be 
considered in residence at Rice for the purpose of this rule. 

2. The total number of pass/fail semester hours shall not exceed 14. 

3. A student may register for only one pass/fail course in a semester. 

4. No courses specifically required for the major, nor courses within the major 
department (or major area for area or interdepartmental majors) may be taken 
pass/fail. 

Courses can be taken under the pass-fail option if the student files the proper form 
in the Registrar's Office no later than the end of the fourth week of classes. The student 
may convert any course so designated to a graded course by the deadline that is 
specified for resolving a grade of "other" by filing the proper form with the Registrar. 
Students should consider declaring pass/fail options early in the semester and 
changing to a grade designation later if appropriate. The Committee on Examinations 
and Standing rarely approves conversion to a pass/fail designation after the deadline. 
Students should be aware that while a P does not affect the GPA, an F for a course taken 
pass-fail does count in the GPA. The pass/fail option may be declared for a course 
taken during the Rice summer session, but this counts toward the total of four courses 
(14 hours). 



Grade Symbols and Designations 

Courses are graded using the following symbols: 

A 

B 

C 

D 

F 

P _ pass — students successfully taking a course pass/fail receive a P. 

S Students successfully completing a designated satisfactory/fail course 

receive an S. The grade of S indicates satisfactory completion of a course 
in which traditional grading procedures are not used. Unsatisfactory 
completion of such a course is indicated by the grade of F. Courses or labs 
in which traditional grading procedures are not used must be designated 
in the "Schedule of Courses Offered" published each semester by the 
, Registrar. Courses so designated may be counted toward the completion 

of a major. Students should be aware that while an S does not affect the 
GPA, an F received in such a course does. 

Designations for special purposes: 

W withdrew 

INC incomplete 

## other 

NG no grade reported by instructor 

NC no credit granted for this course 



94 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

The designations, explained below, do not affect grade averages. 

Instructors are required to report a grade for all students (except auditors) whose 
names appear on the class list. For students who also receive a designation of 
"incomplete" or "other," the grade is determined on the basis of zero credit for the work 
not completed and does not become part of the student's record except as discussed 
below. For students who withdraw from the University within the last five weeks of 
classes, the grade, which will not appear on the student's record, but will be used solely 
in determining eligibility for readmission, should be based on the performance of the 
student up to the time of withdrawal. 

A designation of "incomplete" is reported to the Registrar by the instructor when 
a student has not been able to complete a course because of verified illness or other 
circumstances beyond the student's control during the semester. Such work must be 
completed and a revised grade submitted by the end of the fifth week of the next 
semester; otherwise, the Registrar's Office will record the grade originally submitted 
by the instructor. In fulfilling course expectations, students must be certain that tests, 
papers and other materials that affect a grade or completion of a requirement are 
delivered by hand to the appropriate professor or office. Loss or lateness attributed to 
mail service is not an acceptable excuse for failing to meet academic deadlines. A 
student who receives two or more "incompletes" in a semester is not eligible to enroll 
in more than fourteen semester hours in the semester immediately following. 

A designation of "other" is reported to the Registrar if a student fails to appear for 
the final examination after completing all the other work of a course. A designation 
of "other" must be resolved and a revised grade submitted by the end of the first week 
of classes of the second semester or by the end of the fourth week after commencement, 
whichever is applicable. If no revised grade is received, the Registrar's Office will 
record the grade originally submitted by the instructor. 

A designation of "withdrew" appears for each course for which the student was 
enrolled at the time of withdrawal from the University. Courses dropped by students 
prior to the late drop deadline are removed entirely from the transcript. A "W" is 
recorded for any course dropped with the approval of the Committee on Examinations 
and Standing after the late drop deadline. Requests for late drops that are denied by the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing will result in the earned semester grade 
being recorded on the student's transcipt. See also the section "Voluntary Withdrawal 
and Readmission" for rules concerning withdrawal in the last five weeks of classes. 

A designation of "no grade" indicates that the instructor failed to report a grade. 
Instructors are asked to resolve this situation as quickly as possible. 

Students with designations of "incomplete" and "other" should be aware that they 
may go on probation or suspension when these are changed to grades. 

Students may repeat courses previously failed. The record of the first attempt (and 
grade) remains on the permanent record (transcript). Both grades are included in GPA 
calculations. If students repeat courses previously passed, credit is awarded only once 
unless the course is designated as repeatable for credit. Each attempt remains on the 
permanent record and each grade is included in the GPA. 



ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 95 

Grade Points and Grade Averages 

Grade Grade Points 



A 


4.0 


B 


3.0 


;g--^- 


2.0 


D 


1.0 


F 


0.0 



Plus and minus signs may be attached to each grade except F. One-third of a grade 
point is added or subtracted, respectively. It is general University grading practice to 
give pluses and minuses. 

Grade point averages (GPA's) are calculated as follows. For each course, the 
product of the course credit attempted and the grade points for the grade earned is 
calculated. These products are added for each course and the result is divided by the 
total credit attempted. The result is the GPA. 

GPA's are reported each semester on the student's grade report, and may appear 
on unofficial transcripts. However, GPA's are not included on official transcripts; nor 
are they reported to any external agency. Class ranks are likewise not reported 
externally. 



Faculty Grading Guidelines 

The following guidelines on grading have been drawn up by the Committee on 
Examinations and Standing for the information of faculty and students, the committee 
believes that the following policies have long been supported in practice by the faculty 
both individually and collectively: 

1 . The evaluation of the student's performance in a course and a decision on the 
appropriate grade is the responsibility of the designated instructor or instruc- 
tors in the course. 

2. No student shouldbegivenanextensionof time or opportunities to improve 
a grade that are not available to all members of the class, except for verified 
illness or justified absence from campus. Students who have three scheduled 
final examinations in two consecutive calendar days may, however, take one 
of the examinations at another time. 

3. Students in independent study courses are not to be allowed an extension 
beyond the time when grades are due. Faculty are to submit grades at the end 
of the semester for such students based on work completed during the 
semester. The instructor directing the independent study bears responsibility 
with the student both for ensuring that the work undertaken is appropriate to 
the span of a semester and for determining the degree credit to be received. 

4. The basis for grading and the expectations on all written assignments or tests 
should be clearly explained to the class in advance, preferably in writing at 
the beginning of the semester. The instructor should explain clearly which 
assignments or homework are covered by the Honor Code and which are not. 
To prevent allegations of plagiarism on written assignments, students should 
be warned that all direct and indirect quotations from others sources should 
be properly acknowledged. The instructor should explain the extent to which 
the student's paper is expected to be independent of the references and clearly 
distinguishable from them. 



96 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

5 . Instructors should be willing to give any student an explanation of his or her 
grade as consistent with the grading for the rest of the class. For this reason 
the Committee urges the faculty to preserve all examinations and written 
material not returned to students as well as grade records for the semester for 
at least one month into the following semester so that students may, if they 
wish, review with their instructor the basis for the grade which they have 
received. 

6. Instructors may not change a semester grade after the grade sheet has been 
submitted to the Registrar except for a clerical error in calculating the grade. 
This is a long-standing University rule of which the faculty are reminded by 
the Registrar at the end of each semester. It is designed in part to protect the 
faculty from student pressure for grade changes. All other grade changes, 
including retroactive change to H'/r/ji/rawo/ or incomplete, must be approved 
by the Committee on Examinations and Standing on the basis of a written 
petition from the student and information from the instructor. 

7. There is no University requirement that a final examination be given in a 
course. It is University policy that: 

a. Final examinations that cover more than the material since the last 

examination, that are the only exam in the course, or that are 

comprehensive of the entire course may be given only during the 

final examination period. Such examinations may not. for example, 

'•■•' be labeled "tests" and administered during the last week of classes. 

• '1. b. Final examinations are normally of three hours duration. Faculty 

who, under exceptional circumstances, wish to give longer exami- 

r; nations can do so only ifthe exam is scheduled as take-home. Under 

no circumstances may final exams exceed five hours. The "due 

> ^-A'd ■ date" for all take-home final exams is the end of the examination 

period. 

8. Freshmen students receive mid-semester grades around the eighth week of 
the fall and spring semesters so that they can, if advisable, enroll in tutoring 
or drop a class for which they may not be prepared. Faculty who teach 
freshmen in any of their classes will be asked to submit grades of standing 
for these students during the seventh week of the semester and should 
schedule the grading of tests, quizzes, or homework assignments accord- 
ingly. These grades are not recorded on the student's transcript nor calculated 
in the GPA. but they are important indicators for students and their faculty 
advisers. 

9. Departments using teaching associates, adjunct professors, or visiting fac- 
ulty of any kind should make sure these teachers are familiar with Rice 
grading procedures. A regular faculty member who is well versed in the 
grading guidelines should be assigned to assist such instructors. 

The Chair of the Committee on Examinations and Standing or the Vice President 
for Student Affairs will be glad to advise any faculty member faced with exceptional 
circumstances which may justify special consideration. Students may petition the 
Committee concerning the application of these guidelines. Suspected or possible 
violations of the Honor Code should be submitted to the Honor Council. 



President's Honor Roll 

Outstanding students are recognized each semester through the publication of the 
President's Honor Roll. In order to be eligible, students must have grades exclusive of 
pass-fail and satisfactory-fail in a total of 1 2 or more semester hours and must not have 
any grade of '"F." Approximately 30 percent of all undergraduates are so recognized. 
Undergraduates enrolled in four-year bachelor's degree programs are always eligible 
for the Honor Roll. Students enrolled in five-year bachelor's/master's programs are 
eligible only during their first eight semesters. 

Academic Probation 

A student is placed on academic probation if at the end of any semester: 

1. the student's grade point average for that semester is less than 1.67 or, 

2. the student has a cumulative grade point average less than 1.67. This 
requirement is waived if the GPA for that semester is at least 2.0. 

The period of probation extends to the end of the next semester in which the 
student is enrolled at the University. A student on probation (academic or disciplinary) 
is not permitted to be a candidate or hold any elective or appointive office. 

A student on academic probation is not allowed to enroll in more than 1 7 semester 
hours. A student who receives two or more "incomplete" grades in a semester is not 
eligible to enroll in more than 14 semester hours in the semester immediately 
following. - _ ' ' 

Academic Suspension 

A student is suspended from the University if at the end of any semester: 

1. the student earns grades that would place him/her on academic probation a 
third time, or: 

2. the student earns a grade point average less than 1 .00 for the semester, except 
for students completing their first semester at Rice. 

Students readmitted after a previous suspension will again be suspended if in any 
succeeding semester they fail to achieve at least one of the following requirements: 

1. a cumulative and semester grade point average of at least 1.67, or; 

2. a semester average of at least 2.00. 

The period of a first suspension is normally one semester; the period of a second 
suspension is at least two semesters. Students will not be readmitted following a third 
suspension. 

Suspension is deemed to occur as soon as a responsible University official, 
normally the Registrar, learns that a student's performance has been such as to place 
him or her on suspension. Suspension is lifted the first day of class of the semester in 
which the student returns to the University, or in the case of persons who have served 
the nominal term of suspension but do not intend to return to Rice when they have 
received permission from the Committee on Examinations and Standing to have that 
suspension lifted. 

If a student facing first or second academic suspension can demonstrate to the 
Registrar that he/she can complete degree requirements in one semester if permitted 
to return, the suspension will be reduced to probation. This ruling may be invoked only 
one time during the academic degree plan. 



98 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Students who graduate at the end of a semester in which their academic, 
performance would place them on probation or suspension will not have the terms 
"academic probation" or "suspension" placed on their transcript for that semester. 



Disciplinary Probation and Suspension 

A student may be placed on probation or suspension for an honor code violation 
or for disciplinary reasons through action of the Dean of Students. No student may 
receive a degree while on disciplinary suspension (including that for an honor code 
violation), even if all academic requirements for graduation have been fulfilled. 



Readmission After Suspension 

To obtain readmission after academic suspension, the student must address a 
letter of petition to the Committee on Examinations and Standing; this letter should be 
received at least a month before the beginning of classes. At the same time, the student 
should request two supporting letters from persons under whom the student has 
worked during the suspension period as a student or an employee. If the problems 
causing the previous difficulty appear to have been relieved, the student is generally 
readmitted. Prior to readmission, students returning from a second suspension must 
submit an academic program approved by the Office of Acasdemic Advising. In some 
instances, approval of readmission may be postponed, or suspension may be perma- 
nent. A student desiring special consideration with regard to readmission following 
academic suspension should petition the committee in writing. 

Petitions for readmission following a separation from the University involving 
disciplinary or other non-academic considerations should be submitted in writing and 
will be reviewed by the Dean of Students. 

The Committee on Examinations and Standing does not normally place students 
on probation and suspension as the result of deficient performance in the Rice Summer 
School (although it may do so at its discretion). Students are warned, however, that 
grade averages are affected. 



Voluntary Withdrawal and Readmission 

A student may withdraw voluntarily from the University at any time during the 
semester up until the last day of classes and, if in good academic standing at the time 
of withdrawal, the student is normally readmitted upon written application to the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing. 

Any student desiring to withdraw should inform the college master in person and 
give written notification of withdrawal to the Vice-President for Student Affairs, who 
will notify other offices of the University as necessary. If the student withdraws within 
five weeks of the last day of classes, grades of standing as of the day of withdrawal are 
considered in determining eligibility for readmission. Students with grades of stand- 
ing that would have placed them on suspension had they not withdrawn will, for 
purposes of readmission, be treated as if they had been suspended. Such students 
should follow the guidelines for readmission shown under the suspension rules. 
Students who fail to give notice of withdrawal should expect to receive failing grades. 



Leave of Absence 

A student may request a leave of absence from the University by applying in 
writing to the Committee on Examinations and Standing at any time prior to the first 
day of classes in the semester which marks the beginning of the leave. Leave from the 
University after the first day of classes is considered a voluntary withdrawal. 

To be readmitted following an approved leave of absence of not more than four 
semesters, students need only notify the Vice-President for Student Affairs of their 
intention to terminate their leave at least one month before the beginning of the 
semester. After four semesters, they should apply in writing to the Committee on 
Examinations and Standing, as in the case of a voluntary withdrawal. 

Approval of a leave of absence is always contingent on the student's satisfactory 
completion of course work in the semester preceding the leave; otherwise, the 
approved leave may be converted to suspension. 

Extended Time Graduation . ,-.^ -. 

Students enrolled in four (five-) year bachelor's programs may elect to be subject 
to the academic regulations in effect either at the time of their intial registration at Rice 
or at the time of their graduation, unless they graduate more than seven (eight) years 
after that initial registration. In that case they will be subject to the regulations in effect 
at the time of their last readmission. 

Courses in a student's major program completed more than seven (eight) years 
prior to graduation are subject to review by the appropriate departments. If the 
departments conclude that any such courses are no longer suitable for satisfying the 
requirements of the major, those courses will not be credited toward the major 
program, although they will remain on the student's record. 



Academic Advising and Tutorial Programs 



Rice University provides for academic advising of freshman and sophomore 
students through a well-developed program centered in the residential colleges, 
overseen by the college masters and involving more than 1 50 faculty members. These 
faculty associates are equipped to give broad, inclusive advice to students, as well as 
specific information about individual disciplines. Within each college, faculty mem- 
bers designated as "divisional advisers," representing humanities, social sciences, 
natural sciences, and engineering, additionally advise prospective majors in those 
divisions and give final approval to course schedules and to the dropping and adding 
of classes. Majors in music and architecture obtain course approval from academic 
advisers in the Shepherd School of Music and the School of Architecture, as appropri- 
ate. 

Once a student designates a departmental major, usually in the fourth semester, 
he or she comes under the jurisdiction of an academic department (or departments, in 
the case of a double major) for academic advising and approval of course schedules. 
Area majors obtain approval from the Office of Academic Advising, which operates 
in cooperation with the academic departments involved in each interdisciplinary 
major. 



100 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

The Director of Academic Advising, assisted by faculty associates, serves as an 
administrative liaison between the academic departments and the college advising 
system, maintains an up-to-date file on departmental course requirements, coordinates 
a tutorial program, provides training for faculty and peer advisers, and organizes the 
exchange of academic information between students, advisers, and departments. The 
Director oversees areas that span a range of academic disciplines — area majors, study 
abroad, exchange programs, pre-professional advising, and undergraduate fellow- 
ships — and arranges for programs, such as Majors Day and Orientation Week 
Academic Fair, that inform students about academic options within the Rice curricu- 
lum. 

The Office of Academic Advising serves as a resource center for general 
academic information, for brochures describing study abroad and exchange programs, 
for information regarding prestigious undergraduate fellowships awarded on a na- 
tional basis (Rhodes, Marshall, Luce, etc.) and for application packets for GRE, 
MCAT, LSAT, and GMAT tests. Faculty advisers counsel individual students with 
academic problems and questions. Operating within the Office of Academic Advising, 
the Foreign Student Adviser assists foreign students with visas and with cultural 
adaptation. 

The Rice tutoring program provides free assistance to freshmen in any course and 
to upperclassmen who are having difficulty with introductory courses. Each depart- 
ment with major teaching assignments at the introductory level names a departmental 
coordinator who is responsible for organizing tutorial activities within the department 
and assigning students to group or individual tutoring. The departmental coordinator 
also approves the list of tutors and signs records of completed tutorial sessions. 

Each college also selects a faculty associate who coordinates the tutoring program 
within the college. This faculty member seeks ways to aid communication and help 
advise those students who need tutoring. Both the departmental and college aspects of 
the tutoring program are under the supervision of the Director of Academic Advising. 

Normally, a student who is having academic difficulty should consult with the 
course instructor or the departmental coordinator to arrange for tutoring; however, 
college coordinators provide an alternate referral source. Further information for those 
who need tutoring or who would like to serve as a tutor may be secured from the Office 
of Academic Advising. 

siofi. ; to ani-ifvbb 

Admission of New Students 



From its beginning. Rice University has sought to maintain an academic program 
of the highest excellence for a small body of students. This number has grown with the 
expansion of the university's resources over the past decade, but the total number of 
students admitted to Rice still remains relatively small — approximately 600 students 
in each first-year class. 

In making its selections, the Admission Committee attempts to seek out and 
identify students who have demonstrated exceptional ability and the potential for 
personal and intellectual growth. There is no discrimination whatsoever on the basis 
of sex. sexual preferance, race, color, religion, national or ethnic origin, age, or 
disability. Decisions are based not only on high school grades and test scores but also 



' 101 

on such qualities as leadership, participation in extracurricular activities, and personal 
creativity. The university's aim is diversity rather than uniformity, and it believes that 
students learn from each other and from life in the residential colleges, as well as from 
their classes and laboratories. 

Students are selected on a competitive basis in five academic areas. They are: ( 1 ) 
architecture. (2) humanities and social sciences. (3) engineering. (4) music, and (5) 
natural sciences. Applicants should give careful consideration to the category under 
which they wish to be considered. Students, however, are free to change from one of 
these areas to another, after consultation with their adviser. Only architecture and 
music have strictly limited enrollments. Occasionally, physical limitations of other 
departments may make it necessary to limit enrollment of majors. 

There are five basic measures generally used in evaluation of candidates for 
admission: ( 1 ) scholastic record as reflected by the courses chosen and the quality of 
performance, (2) scores on the Scholastic Aptitude and Achievement Tests adminis- 
tered by the College Board. (3) recommendations from teachers and counselors, (4) 
the recommended personal interview, and (5) the application itself. The Admission 
Committee is particularly interested in any information that can give insight into the 
extracurricular areas of development and such intangible factors as motivation, 
intellectual curiosity, character, and special talents. 

1. The High School Record. The completion of not less than 16 acceptable 
units is required. The record must include the following units: 

English 4 Laboratory science 2 

Social Studies 2' (biology, chemistry, physics, etc.) 

Mathematics 3 Additional credits in above- 3 

A foreign language 2 listed subjects 

Total 16 

Students admitted with academic deficiencies will be asked to complete the 
required work by taking high school or college level courses during the summer before 
enrollment at Rice. 

Courses in chemistry, physics and trigonometry or other advanced mathematics 
courses are required of applicants for the engineering and science divisions. 

2. Entrance Examinations. The required entrance examinations are adminis- 
tered by the College Board. The College Board bulletins and test applications are 
available from high school counseling offices or the Rice Admission Office. The 
applicant is responsible for making arrangements to take the examinations, and 
official score reports must be submitted before the student can be considered for 
admission (see the calendar on page 104). 



102 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

The following tests are required according to the curriculum desired: 

A. Humanities, Social Sciences, B. Science or Engineering 

Architecture, or Music ( 1 ) Scholastic Aptitude Test 

(1) Scholastic Aptitude Test (2) Three Achievement Tests 

(2) Three Achievement Tests as follows 

as follows (a) English composition* 

(a) English composition* (b) Mathematics 

(b) any two of the following: (Level I, Level II, or Level IIC) 
A foreign language (c) Chemistry or physics 
American history 

... , t European history and 

world cultures *with or without essay 

Literature 
Mathematics 
A science 

3. Candidates must submit evaluations from a counselor and one teacher. 

The necessary forms are included in the application. 

4. The Personal Interview. Although a personal interview is not a require- 
ment, we recommend an interview as an excellent opportunity to discuss your 
interests, needs, and questions. It can assist the Committee on Admission in reaching 
a decision based on nonacademic, as well as academic aspects of the candidate's 
development. If an interview is desired, the calendar on page 106 should serve as a 
timeline. Campus interviews, which must be scheduled two weeks in advance, are held 
at 109 Lovett Hall between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through 
Friday, and from 9:00 a.m. to 1 1:30 a.m. on Saturday. (*Summer schedule does not 
include Saturday morning hours, but interviews are available throughout the week for 
seniors.) Note: During the senior year, Houston area students who would like to 
interview must arrange for a campus interview at one of the designated Houston- Area 
interview sessions. No interviews will he held after January 15. Applicants who are 
unable to visit the university may wish to meet with a traveling member of the 
admissions staff, or may arrange to be interviewed by alumni interviewers located 
throughout the United States and in several foreign countries. Candidates for admis- 
sion to the Shepherd School of Music must arrange for an audition with a member of 
the music faculty. Architecture applicants should interview with a faculty member in 
the School of Architecture and submit a portfolio. 

5. The Application. The application provides the committee with important 
information on the student's background and gives the applicant an opportunity to 
provide statements on his or her interests, experiences, and goals. Please note that no 
application fee is required of candidates for admission to Rice. 



■ 103 

Early Decision Plan 

The Early Decision Plan is open to candidates for admission who regard Rice 
University as their first choice and will await the outcome of their application to Rice 
before applying elsewhere. Students applying for the fall semester 1990 under the 
Early Decision Plan must complete the required Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) on or 
before the October testing date in the senior year. The Achievement Tests ( ACH) must 
be taken by the June test date in the junior year. All other materials should be filed by 
November 1. Admission notices will be mailed on December 1. 

Requirements for admission are not altered by an early decision. Those accepted 
are expected to complete the remainder of their high school work with superior 
performance. Early Decision candidates should apply for financial aid using the Early 
Version of the Financial Aid Form (FAF). Those applying by November 1 will be 
notified by December 1. Late filers will be notified as soon as their information is 
processed. 

If the Admission committee does not have sufficient reason for an affirmative 
decision in December, action on some applications will be deferred until the Regular 
Decision period. An additional semester of the high school record and additional 
College Board scores from the November. December, or January tests may be added 
for later consideration. The applicant will, of course, be released from the pledge to 
apply only to Rice. An applicant offered admission under the Early Decision Plan must 
make a $100 non-refundable registration deposit within 30 days in order to hold his 
or her place in the incoming class. Those who desire a room on campus must make an 
additional $50 deposit. 



Interim Decision Plan 

Applicants who complete their SAT and Achievement Tests on or by the 
December testing date and who file all other materials by December 1 may be 
considered in the Interim Decision Plan and notified of the outcome by early February. 
If the Admission Committee does not have sufficient reason for an affirmative decision 
in February, some applicants will be denied admission and a limited number may be 
deferred until the Regular Decision period. 



Regular Decision Plan 

Regular Decision applications postmarked by January 2 are considered by April 
1 . Applications received after January 2 are considered only after all earlier applica- 
tions. Candidates who apply after January 2 must do so in full knowledge that they are 
in a highly speculative position. 

Regular Decision applicants who are offered admission should make a SI 00 
registration deposit by May 1 to reserve their places in the incoming class. After May 
! . deposits are not refundable. Those who desire a room on campus must make an 
additional $50 deposit. 



104 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Financial aid applicants for Interim and Regular Decision should consult the 
calendar below for deadlines and notification dates. Late filers will be notified as soon 
as their information is processed. 

Admission Calendar 



Early 
Decision 

Application by 
*November 1 



Interim 
Decision 

Application by 
*December 1 



Regular 
Decision 

Application by 
*January 2 



Transfer 

Application by 
* April 1 for fall, 
*November 1 for 
spring 



Required SAT 
on or by October 
test date in 
senior year, 
Achievement 
Tests on or by 
June test date 
in junior year 



Required SAT 
and 

Achievement 
Tests 

completed on 
or by December 
test date 



Required SAT 
and 

Achievement 
Tests 

completed on 
or by January 
test date 



Required SATif 
never previously 
taken 



Interview 
(if desired) 
completed by 
November 1 



Interview 
(if desired) 
completed by 
December 1 



Interview 
(if desired) 
completed by 
January 15 



No interview 



Notification of 
admission 
mailed 
December 1 



Notification of 
admission 
mailed 
February 1 



Notification of 
admission 
mailed 
April 1 



Notification by 
June 1 or 
December 15 



Financial Aid 
Form (Early 
Version) filed 
by November 1 
Financial Aid 
notification by 
December 1 



Financial Aid 
Form filed 
by January 15, 
Financial Aid 
notification by 
February 1 



Financial Aid 
Form filed 
by March 1 , 
Financial Aid 
notification by 
April 1 



Notification 
when admitted; 
allow 1 month 
after filing 
Financial Aid 
Form 



Deposit by 
January 1 
nonrefundable 



Deposit by 
May 1 

(Candidates' 
Reply Date) 
nonrefundable 
after May 1 



Deposit by 
May 1 

(Candidates' 
Reply Date) 
nonrefundable 
after May 1 



Nonrefundable 
$100 deposit 
within 15 days 
of admission 



NOTE: For students desiring on-campus accommodations, a $50.00 room deposit 
should accompany your registration deposit. The room deposit may be refunded or 
credited to the applicant's account until May 1. No application fee is required of 
candidates for admission to Rice. 



*Rice University will accept applications for admission if postmarked by the date 
indicated for the respective decision plan. 



105 

Advanced Placement/CLEP 

Entering first-year students who have done work well beyond the usual high 
school courses in certain subjects and who score 4 or 5 on the Advanced Placement 
College Board examinations prior to matriculation at Rice are given university credit 
toward graduation for appropriate Rice courses satisfying distribution or free elective 
requirements. Acceptance of such credit in fulfillment of a student's major require- 
ments is subject to approval by the department in question. 

During Orientation Week the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) test 
on calculus with elementary functions is given. Freshmen only may take this test. 
Satisfactory performance results in credit for Math 101. (A fee of approximately 
$30.00 is charged for taking the CLEP test.) 

Rice students who earn the International Baccalaureate diploma will, subject to 
approval by the relevant departments, receive credit for individual higher level exams 
for which they receive a score of 6 or 7. Students from high schools that offer 
International Baccalaureate courses but not the diploma will receive credit according 
to the same criteria. 

Furthermore, during orientation week at the beginning of the academic year, 
entering students may take placement tests administered by various departments at 
Rice. On the basis of these tests, students may be advised to register in courses beyond 
the introductory level. In most cases, degree credit is not given for these tests. 



Transfer Students 

Rice University encourages application from students with superior records who 
wish to transfer from a two-year college or a four-year college or university. Interested 
students should request a transfer application form from the Office of Admission. 

Applications for admission in the fall semester should be filed by April 1 and be 
accompanied by official transcripts of all high school and college work completed to 
date and courses in progress. Notification of admission is mailed on June 1. Applica- 
tions for admission for the spring semester with the appropriate transcripts must be 
filed by November 1 . Notification of admission is mailed by December 15. The criteria 
used in evaluating transfer applications are essentially the same as those applied to 
applicants for the first-year class, except that special emphasis is given to performance 
at the college level. Because of the highly competitive nature of transfer admission, 
it is recommended that applicants have a minimum 3.2 (4.0 scale) G. P. A. on all college 
work. Scholastic Aptitude Test scores are required. If candidates have not previously 
taken College Board tests, they must take the Scholastic Aptitude Test no later than 
April if they wish to apply for admission in the fall or November for the spring 
semester. Achievement Tests are not required. 

Transfer students must be registered in residence at Rice for at least four full 
semesters during the fall or spring terms and must complete not less than 60 semester 
hours for a Rice degree. 

Note XhaX first-year candidates may apply for entry in the fall semester only, 
because Rice does not accept freshmen at midyear. Transfer candidates may be 
admitted for either the spring or fall semesters, except for students applying to the 
School of Architecture, who may enter in the fall only. 

For further information or application forms, prospective candidates for under- 
graduate admission should communicate with the Office of Admission. When request- 
ing application forms, candidates should indicate that they are prospective transfers 
from another college. 



106 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Visiting Students 

Students who wish to spend a semester or a year at Rice taking courses for credit 
to be applied toward their undergraduate degree at another school should apply for 
admission as visiting students through the Office of Admission. The student's 
application should be accompanied by an official transcript of college work to date and 
a letter from the student's academic dean or registrar agreeing to grant transfer credit 
subject to satisfactory performance. Visiting student applications should be post- 
marked by June 1 for the fall semester and by November 1 for the spring semester. 

Visiting students are assigned membership in a college during their stay and are 
charged the same fees as other undergraduates. In a few classes where enrollment is 
limited because of space or other considerations, candidates for Rice degrees have 
priority over visiting students. 



Rice/Baylor College of Medicine Premedical Scholars' Program 

The Premedical Scholars' Program is designed for talented and motivated 
students who desire careers in medicine or biomedical science research. Up to 15 
graduating high school senior students will be admitted to Rice University and Baylor 
College of Medicine concurrently. This program involves the traditional four years at 
Rice followed by four years at Baylor College of Medicine. Selection to the Program 
is conducted through the established admission process at Rice. Finalists for the 
Program will be expected to interview at Baylor College of Medicine. Notification of 
interview will be sent to students in late March and decisions will be made by April. 
Applications for the Program can be requested from the Rice Admission Office and 
must be completed in addition to the Rice admission application. Applications for the 
Program are due by February 15. Applicants who are not admitted to the Premedical 
Scholars" Program are still eligible for admission to Rice and are still eligible to apply 
to Baylor College of Medicine upon graduation from Rice. - 



Class III Students 

Class III standing at Rice University designates students with an undergraduate 
or graduate degree from an accredited college or university who are taking courses for 
credit but not in a specific degree program. Students interested in this program should 
contact the Office of Graduate Programs. 



Admission of High School Students to Take Courses for Credit 

Accelerated high school juniors and seniors who have taken all the courses in a 
given discipline available to them in high school may request admission to Rice for the i 
purpose of taking one or more university level courses on the same basis as Rice 
undergraduates. Such courses are graded for credit, and the university sends a 
transcript of this record by student request to any college or university. If the high 
school student is later admitted to Rice, any such courses are counted toward the^ 
student's undergraduate degree at Rice. Tuition for such courses is S370 per semester 



107 

hour plus a $50 registration fee, the total not to exceed $4,250. These charges are for 
1992-93 and are subject to change in subsequent years. Application for admission 
should be made to the Admission Office. Financial assistance is not available for this 
program. 



Auditors 

Any interested person, including currently enrolled students, may audit one or 
more courses at Rice by securing permission of the instructor and by registering as an 
auditor with the Registrar. The university grants no academic credit for such work. 
Audit credit does not appear on transcripts. Currently enrolled students may audit 
courses without charge. Rice alumni may audit as many courses as they wish for a fee 
of $25 per semester. All others are charged $50 per course per semester for the privilege 
of auditing. 



Student Housing 

Information about residence in the colleges and room application forms accom- 
pany the notice of admission sent to each new undergraduate. Room reservations 
cannot be made prior to notification of admission. 

At present. Rice University has the capacity to house about 70 percent of its 
undergraduate students in the residential colleges on campus. Although the majority 
of students desiring to live in the colleges can be accommodated, demand usually 
exceeds the available number of rooms. Every effort is made to provide housing in the 
colleges for all incoming first-year students who wish to live on campus, but space 
cannot be guaranteed. Continuing students draw for rooms according to the priority 
system in each college. No student is required to live on campus. Off-campus members 
are encouraged to eat in their colleges and to participate in college activities. 

Correspondence from new students regarding housing in the residential college 
should be addressed to the Office of Admission. Information concerning off-campus 
housing is available from the Office of Academic Advising. 



Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 



The tuition for undergraduate students in 1992-93 is $8,500 per year, $4,250 
payable prior to the beginning of each semester. 

Students taking fewer than 12 hours by special permission are billed at the rate 
of $370 per semester hour for the courses in which they are enrolled plus a $50 
registration fee, the total tuition and registration fee not to exceed $4,250 per semester. 

Any undergraduate who withdraws or takes an approved leave of absence and is 
then readmitted to the university is charged the tuition in effect during the semester in 
which he or she returns. 



108 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Fees . . , 

All undergraduate students and candidates for a second bachelor's degree are 
charged the following annual fees, payable in full at the time of the student's first; 
tuition payment for the year or any portion of the year. An exception is the Health 
Service fee, which is paid in two installments, half before the beginning of the fall 
semester and half before the beginning of the spring semester. 

Student Activities Fee* $ 52.85 

Athletic Events Fee 50.00 

College Fee 60.00 

Health Service Fee 170.00 

Total basic fees l^:.:.Li'^-:j.'.::^A $332.85 

*Fifth-year students working toward a second Bachelor's degree may pay a reduced Student Activities Fee ' 
of $4.70, which covers the .Student Association, University Court and Honor Council portions of the activity 
fee, and may elect not to pay the College Fee. 

All Rice students are required to have health insurance. Insurance for the 1992- 
93 school year may be purchased atayearly premium of $613 (Plan A) or $463 (Plan 
B) from the University's program developed for Rice students. Coverage will be 
effective from 12:01 a.m.. August 15, 1992, until 12:01 a.m., August 15, 1993. 
Dependent coverage is also available (application and policy description can be 
obtained from the Cashier's Office or the Office of Student Activities and Advising). 
If you have other medical insurance, a waiver form showing proof of insurance must 
be signed and returned to the Cashier's Office by August 15 to avoid being charged 
for insurance. 



Special Charges 

Orientation week room and board (required for all new students) $100.00 

Late registration and late course changes see p. 91 

Late application fee for Class III $50.00 

,■'■.■■.• .■■;•• Sk::: I. t> • cr^>i 

Refund of Tuition and Fees and Appeal Procedure 

A student who withdraws during the first two weeks of the semester is not charged 
tuition or fees for that semester. A student who withdraws during the third week is 
charged 30 percent of the semester's tuition. The amount of the refund is reduced by 
10 percent at the beginning of each successive week. No refund is made for withdraw- 
als after the ninth week. There is no refund of fees or special charges after the second 
week of classes in the semester. The $100 registration deposit paid by incoming 
students is not refunded at any time if the student withdraws. There is no partial refund 
of fees paid for the full year for withdrawals or leaves of absence in the spring semester. 

Students who receive approval to be enrolled in a course load below twelve hours 
during the first nine weeks of the semester may be entitled to a rebate of tuition. 

Student requests for special consideration in connection with waivers, refunds, or 
adjusted payments on tuition, fees, and other charges, which cannot be satisfactorily 
resolved between the student and the Cashier's Office, should be forwarded to the 
Vice-President for Student Affairs. Resolution of waivers and refunds for room and 
board charges should be arranged through the Vice-President for Finance and 
Administration. 



; 109 

Teacher Certification Program Fees 

Students enrolling in the apprenticeship or the internship plan are charged a $ 1 00 
registration fee for each semester; an additional $25 registration fee (paid to the Office 
of Continuing Studies) is charged for each summer session. 



Delinquent Accounts 

No student in arrears in any financial obligation to Rice University as of the date 
announced for the completion of registration for any semester can be registered. No 
certificate of attendance, diploma, or transcript of credit is issued at any time for a 
student whose account is in arrears. 

Students who have not made satisfactory arrangements with the Cashier for 
payment of current charges or have moved on campus without executing a satisfactory 
room contract may be discharged from the University. 



Transcripts ~ 

Transcripts are issued on written request made to the Office of the Registrar. No 
transcript is issued without consent of the individual whose record is concerned. There 
is a charge of $1 for each copy, payable in advance. Those requesting transcripts by 
mail should include payment with the request. 



Living Expenses 

Residence fees, to cover costs of dining halls and operation of residences, are 
established from year to year as requirements dictate. For 1992-93. the annual Room 
and Board charge for residence in a residential college is $5,200. This charge provides 
room and all the meals eaten during the year for most students. All meals are priced 
on an a la carte basis. Food Service provides 3 meals per day Monday through Friday 
and continental breakfast and brunch on Saturday and Sunday. Meals are not served 
during the Thanksgiving holidays, mid-year, fall, and spring mid-term recesses, and 
spring holidays. Information on optional meal plans is available from the College Food 
Service. When securing room assignments for the academic year to follow, each 
student is required to sign a lease agreement. To assure reservation of space, current 
students must sign a lease by the date established in the various colleges, but no later 
than April 15. New students are required to make a $50 deposit prior to May 1 . These 
deposits are not returnable, but are applied against the following semester's charges. 
The balance of the residence fee is payable in installments. The exact amounts and due 
dates are stated in the Residential Lease Agreement that each on-campus resident is 
required to sign. 

Students terminating their residence for any reason shall be entitled to a refund 
or credit of the unspent reduced balance of board charges, but are held responsible for 
payment of the room charge for the entire academic year. Exceptions to the room 
charge payment (example: academic suspension. Rice sponsored study abroad, and 
family emergencies) will be dealt with on a case by case basis. 



^ 



1 1 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Financial Aid 



The financial aid program at Rice University provides assistance to meet the costs 
of attendance for all students who are admitted and demonstrate computed financial 
need. Through grants, low interest loans, campus work opportunities, or a combination 
of these programs. Rice attempts to give the students sufficient aid to meet educational 
expenses. 

The financial aid program is funded from many sources. Rice University receives 
contributions from alumni and friends; these funds are used to initiate and maintain 
scholarships and loan funds. Federal programs, both grant and loan, the state grant 
program, and the Rice University tuition grant also provide funds. Awards are based 
primarily on financial need. 

The University publishes budgets that realistically summarize student expenses 
including living costs at home and on- or off-campus, personal expenses and necessary 
travel. 

Parents are expected to contribute according to their means, taking into account 
their income, assets, number of dependents, and other relevant factors. Students 
themselves are expected to contribute from their own assets and earnings, including 
appropriate borrowing against future earnings. 

A brochure entitled Rice University Financial Aid explains the program of 
assistance in detail. Students may secure a copy from the Office of Admission or the 
Office of Financial Aid. The determination of need is based on information supplied 
through the College Scholarship Service. Need is defined as the amount required to 
meet the difference between the student's total educational expenses and the family's 
resources. " • ~ '^^ 

' •• ■ ^ ' ■ ■'••■' ■' 'nib 10 8J2O0 19V03 OJ .aSS't 30 ''^ 

moiiupST i'M iBiy oi iBsy mo 

Application 

.1)1 

To apply for financial assistance, the candidate must file ( I ) The Rice University 
financial aid application with the University, (2) The Financial Aid Form (FAF) with 
the College Scholarship Service, and (3) Photocopies of Parents' and Student's IRS 
1040, I040A or 1040EZ. Notification of awards will be mailed when the financial aid 
file is complete. When Rice University receives these forms, the applicant is consid- 
ered for all appropriate assistance administered by the University including grants, 
scholarships, loans and work. Early decision candidates will be mailed Early Version 
Financial Aid Forms in October. 

Financial aid awards are made on an annual basis and are payable as indicated on 
the award letter. 

Since financial circumstances change from year to year, annual review and 
adjustment of need and awards is necessary. Therefore, continuing students must file 
the Rice University financial aid application with the University and the Financial Aid 
Form with the College Scholarship Service every year in which they desire assistance. 

The University may from time to time adjust its methods of computing financial 
need or its policies regarding the types of financial assistance that it offers, for the 
purpose of meeting the financial needs of the largest possible number of students. 
Therefore, the amount and type of financial aid may change from previous years, even 
when the student's financial situation appears to remain relatively stable. 



, --, y- ■ : ■ •■' ^ . __ - ■: ^--^ -,- 111 
Financing 

Meeting the costs of higher education in a private university may be difficuU even 
though the usual financial analysis indicates no need for financial aid. It is understood 
that even though a family's financial situation may be adequate to afford the cost of 
tuition, fees, and room and board without financial aid, payment of relatively large 
sums at stated times may require rearrangement of family planning that results in 
hardships or sacrifice. Rice University offers two payment plans to permit financing 
of educational costs. Both require low interest charges. 

A deferred payment plan permits the payment of each semester's charges to be 
divided over four payments. Arrangements are made through the Cashier's Office. 
Applications and details are available each semester at the time of billing. 

Longer term financing is available to eligible students through the Parent Loans 
for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) program. Applications are available in the Rice 
University Office of Financial Aid, and Rice will arrange processing if needed. 

Satisfactory Progress Policy for Financial Aid Recipients 

The Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended by Congress in 1980, mandates 
that institutions of higher education maintain minimum standards of "satisfactory 
progress" in order for students to receive financial aid. 



Policy for Undergraduate Students 

1. Financial Aid Probation. A student is placed on financial aid probation if at 
the end of any semester: (a) the student has a cumulative grade point average less than 
1.67, or (b) the student's grade point average for that semester is less than 1.67. The 
period of probation extends to the end of the next semester in which the student is 
enrolled at the University. 

2. Financial Aid Ineligibility. A student is ineligible for financial aid if at the end 
of any semester: (a) the student earns grades that would result in financial aid probation 
a third time, or (b) the student earns a grade point average less than 1.00 for that 
semester, except for students completing their first semester at Rice. 

3. Reinstatement of Financial Aid Eligibility. The period of financial aid 
ineligibility is normally at least one semester. To regain eligibility, the student must 
address a letter of petition to the Committee on Student Financial Aid following the 
same instructions which apply to the readmission of suspended students as written in 
the Rice University General Announcements. Suspended students readmitted by the 
Committee on Examinations and Standing need not petition the Committee on Student 
Financial Aid if the conditions in Section 5 have been met. 

4. Requirements for Students Regaining Financial Aid Eligibility. A student 
regaining financial aid eligibility will again become ineligible if in any succeeding 
semester he/she fails to achieve either: (a) a cumulative and semester grade point 
average of at least 1 .67, or (b) a semester average of at least 2.00. Ineligibility a second 
time will result in at least two semesters without aid. Normally a student will not again 
receive aid after a third ineligibility. 

5. Maximum Time Frame to Complete Educational Objective. Undergradu- 
ate students are eligible to receive financial aid for 10 semesters (except Rice Tuition 
Grant — see Section "C" of "Rice University — Financial Aid Policies and Proce- 
dures"). All semesters for which a student has a transcript in the Registrar's Office are 
counted in the 10 semester limitation even if no financial aid was received. To make 



1 1 2 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

normal satisfactory progress, a student must earn a minimum of 18 semester hours 
credit by the end of the first academic year, 44 semester hours credit by the end of the 
second year, 70 semester hours credit by the end of the third year, and 96 semester hours 
credit by the end of the fourth year. A student who is ineligible because of insufficient 
semester hours credit may be considered eligible for aid only when enough credits, 
including incomplete courses, have been completed to make up the credit shortage. The 
academic year commences with the first day of classes of the fall semester and 
continues to the first day of classes the following fall. 



Policy for Graduate Students 

Satisfactory academic progress will be determined by the student's department at 
the end of each academic year but the student must have at least a 2.33 cumulative 
GPA. 



Notification for All Students 

The Office of Financial Aid will notify, by letter, any student qualifying for 
financial assistance who does not meet minimum satisfactory progress and who is 
being terminated from aid. Following the fall semester, notices are considered 
delivered when sent to the colleges of undergraduate students and to the departments 
of graduate students. Following the spring semester, notices will be sent to the most 
recent permanent address provided to the Registrar by the student and are considered 
delivered. 

....... . -; gbnsj. 

Appeals for All Students 

Any student deemed ineligible for financial aid due to lack of satisfactory 
progress has the opportunity to appeal such action to the Committee on Student 
Financial Aid. Appeals must be made in writing to the Chairman of the Committee. 
Mitigating circumstances will be considered. 



Student Loan Funds ^ 

Perkins Loans (fomerly NDSL) are awarded by the Office of Financial Aid to help ' 
meet the self-help portion of aid under Rice University packaging policy. 

A few endowments have been established for student loans primarily as memorial 
tributes. These funds are in addition to the normal financial aid program. They are used 
for emergency loans to students who experience unexpected financial problems during 
a term or for a student who shows additional need beyond regular eligibility. 

Karl Bailey-William Carroll Memorial Loan Fund ' 

Frank McFadden Caldwell Loan Fund 

Louise Adele Drenkle Loan Fund 

Mary Alice Elliott Loan Fund 

Gulf Oil Educational Foundation Loan Fund 

Houston Bridge League Loan Fund 

Marie Engle Johnson Scholarship Loan Fund 



113 



Benjamin S. Lindsey and Veola Noble Lindsey Memorial Loan Fund 

Lora B. Peck Loan Fund 

Rice Institute Loan Fund 

Students Memorial Loan Fund 

Owen Wister Literary Society Alumnae Loan Fund 



Student Employment 

Employment is available to students interested in working part time during the 
academic year. These work opportunities are available both on campus and off 
campus. Students seeking employment should apply directly to the Financial Aid 
Office. 



Vocational Rehabilitation 

The Texas Rehabilitation Commission offers assistance for tuition and 
nonrefundable fees to students who have certain disabling conditions if their voca- 
tional objectives have been approved by a TRC counselor. Examples of such condi- 
tions are orthopedic deformities, emotional disorders, diabetes, epilepsy, and heart 
conditions. Other services are also available to assist the handicapped student in 
becoming employable. Application for such service should be made at the Texas 
Rehabilitation Commission. Students with visual handicaps should contact the Texas 
State Commission for the Blind. 



Undergraduate Scholarships and Awards 

General Awards and Scholarships 

Joe L. and Barbara AUbritton Scholarship 

Herbert Allen Scholars 

Helen and Herbert Allen Scholarship , 

Florrie Ethel and M. E. Andrews Scholarship .. 

Robert and Elaine Andrews Scholarship 

Samuel S. Ashe Scholarship 

Asian American Youth Organization Scholarship 

Astronaut Fund 

Max Autrey Memorial Scholarship 

Axson Club. Ellen Axson Wilson Scholarship 

Axson Club, Katie B. Howard Scholarship 

Axson Club. Special Scholarship Honoring Mrs. A. S. Foote 

Axson Club, Pauline M. Crouch Scholarship 

Axson Club, Elanor Trotter Huddleston Scholarship 

Graham Baker Studentship 

James A. and Alice Graham Baker Distinguished Scholar 

James A. and Alice Graham Baker Honor Scholars 

James Foulds Barbour Scholarship 

Eric and Arabella Beall Scholarship 

H. Leroy Bell Scholarship 



1 14 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Mr. and Mrs. Val T. Billups Scholarship ' ' 

Board of Governors Scholarships 
Paul Frederick Bobb Award 
Beverly and Donald Bonham Scholarship 
Weldon Brigance Scholarship 
Fletabel Denton Briggs Memorial Scholarships 
Franz and Frances Brotzen Scholarship 
' Robbie N. Bruner Endowment Fund 
Clyde and Ethel Butcher Scholarship 
Harriana Butler Scholarship 
' Chapman-Bryan Memorial Scholarship 

George Alva Chatfield Scholarship , , , ^ 

Barbara Long Chilton Scholarship ' ■ ■ .^f " i, 

Class of 1921 Scholarship '' 

Class of 1929 Scholarship . ..,. . 

Class of 1930 Scholarship 

Class of 1931 Scholarship - 

Class of 1932 Scholarship 

Class of 1933 Scholarship 

Class of 1934 Scholarship 

Class of 1935 Scholarship 

Class of 1936 Scholarship 

Class of 1937 Scholarship 

Class of 1938 Scholarship ...... 

Class of 1939 Scholarship 
Class of 1940 Scholarship 
Class of 1941 Scholarship k.-i.« ■^r**ri^'^c'\( 

Class of 1942 Scholarship ' -^j ?^ 

College Bowl Champions Scholarship 

College Women's Club Scholarship 

Arthur B. Cohn Scholarship 

William Arthur Combs Scholarship 

Millie Tutt Cook Scholarship 

John W. Cox Research Fund for Scholarships and Fellowships in 

Bioengineering and Biosciences 
Dr. Margaret Crofton Scholarship 

Tom Crumpton Memorial Award ■; 

Kenneth Wallace Cunningham Scholarship f'-'i-'Q/. 

Daughters of the American Revolution, John McKnitt Alexander Scholarship 

Daughters of the American Revolution, Fannie Bess Emery 

Montgomery Scholarship 
Daughters of the American Revolution, Lady Washington Texas 

Centennial Award 
Pradipta Kumar Day Scholarship 
Decade 1975 Scholarship 
Decade 1976 Scholarship 
Thomas A. and Pauline M. Dickson Scholarship 
Edith Jo Leeseman Dissinger Scholarship 
Thomas P. and Maude Seeger Dow Scholarships 
James H. Durbin Scholarship 
C. A. Dwyer Scholarship 



115 



James H. and Minnie M. Edmonds Scholarship 

T. C. Edwards Scholarship a , 

Epoch Matching Funds -' 

Catherine Goodrich Fay Scholarship .: 

Thomas Flaxman Scholarship 

Thomas R. and Julia H. Franklin Scholarships 

Joe Gallegly Scholarship 

General University Scholarship Fund 

George Foundation Scholarship 

Getola and Verveer Families Scholarship 

Mary Parker Gieseke Scholar 

Glasscock Scholarship 

Herbert Godwin Endowment Fund ■ 

Richard P. Goodwin Scholarship 

Richard L. Grider Scholarship 

William Randolph Hearst Scholarship Endowment Fund — 

Minority Scholarship 
James D. Henry Scholarship Fund 

Annette Schreiber Hill and William Bruce Hill Scholarship 
Lionel B. Hohenthal Scholarships 
Honors Scholarship for Minorities 

Lillian and Carl Illig Scholarships . i ,i 

Mercer T. Ingram Scholarship 
Interfaith Charities Scholarship 
Meredith H. James Scholarship 
Jameson Fellowship 

Alfred R. and Eleanor H. Johnson Scholarship 
Gaylord Johnson Scholars 

Grant William Jordan and Cora Jordan Memorial Scholarships 
John T. King Scholarship 
Carolyn Walker Lard Scholarship Fund 
Julia Merle and Roy Lay Scholarship 
Leadership Award for Minorities 
A. C. Lederer, Jr. Scholarship 
Patrons of E. L. Lester and Company Scholarship 
Mason G. Lockwood Engineering Scholarship 
The Lottman Scholarships 
Daniel B. and Mary H. Lovejoy Scholarship 
Genevieve Parkhill Lykes Scholarship 
J. Everett McAshan Scholarship 
Margaret Brokaw McCann Scholarship '.' ■ 

John Charlton McCoy, Jr. Scholarship 
William A. McElroy Scholarship 
Michael Vincent McEnany Award 
J. L. C. McFaddin Scholarship ;». 

W. P. H. McFaddin Scholarship 

John P. McGovem Outstanding Pre-Medical Student Award 
Emma S. McGree Scholarship 
Bayliss Mclnnis and Family Scholarship 
James G. and Alberta Matteson McMurtry Scholarship 
Franklin G. and Harriet Chelgren Meek Scholarship 



1 1 6 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Hope and Byron Meredith Scholarship nr *' tnr. V 

Gilbert A. Metz, Jr. Scholarship 

Achille and Malline Meyer Memorial Scholarship 

John and Harriet Millington Scholarship 

Mobil Scholars 

Frances Black and Raymond Moers Scholarship 

Elizabeth Morford Scholarship 

Bemey L. Morgan Scholarship 

W. Kyle Morrow, Jr. Scholarship 

Motheral-Neilan Scholarship 

Leon M. Nad Scholarship 

Ida R. and Hanna E. Nussbaum Scholarship 

Rebecca Raphael and Lily G. Nussbaum Scholarship i-I niv/l 

Charles Breckenridge Parkhill Scholarship -^ooiy , 

J. H. Pearlstone Memorial Scholarship .nO ,J b 

Raymond Pearson Scholarship .,; ■ .;i.!.r 

Presidential Scholarship for Minorities niffpiKloH 

Elsie Rachlin Scholarship 

Emanuel and Mose Raphael Scholarship 

Robert H. Ray Memorial Scholarships 

Ernest R. Rechel Memorial Scholarships 

William J. Reckling Memorial Scholarship 

Randy T. Reese Memorial Scholarship 

Torkild Rieber Award 

Rice Sponsored National Merit Scholarships and National Achievement 

Scholarships 
William Marsh Rice Scholarships ..^...,,.,^. 

Mrs. L. A. Richardson Scholarships 
Daniel Ripley Scholars ifcUK-l £7oD 

Edith Ripley Scholarship 

Dwane Rivers Scholarship in Chemical Engineering 
Carl A. Robertus and Ellen J. Robertus Scholarship in Science 
James M. and Sarah Rockwell Scholarships 
Pamela Davis Rogers Scholarship 

Catherine Withers Roper and Benjamin E. Roper Memorial Scholarship 
Volney J. Rose Scholarship 
Willie Rowell and Ruth Andrews Scholarship 
The Roy Scholarships 
David Miller Rulfs, Jr. Scholarship 
Susan T. Scanlon Scholarship 
Anita and Campbell Sewall Scholarship 
Lee Sharrar Scholarship 
Evelyn Slomovitz Memorial Scholarship 
Society of Rice University Women Scholarship 
Southland Paper Mills Foundation Scholarship 
Richard Steed Scholarships 
Selden D. and Virginia H. Steed Scholarship 
Sara Stratford Scholarship 
Nola McCarty Symms Scholarship 
Hope Pierce Tartt Scholarship 
James U. and Margot Teague Scholarship 



117 



Beth Turner Scholarship 

USX Foundation Scholarship 

University Scholars Scholarship 

University Scholars for Minorities 

Herschel M. Vaughan Student Scholarship 

John B. Warren, Jr. Scholarship 

Abe and Rae Weingarten Scholarship 

Harris Weingarten Scholarship 

Elizabeth Aldridge Wells Scholarship 

Gordon R. West Scholarship 

Blanche White Honor Scholars 

Charles K. and Maidie Autry Wilbanks Student Fund 

Leah Jean Benke Wilbanks Memorial Scholarship 

Willoughby C. Williams Scholarship 

Eugene L. and Annie Maye Wilson Scholarship 

Ervin Kenneth Zingler Scholarship 



Awards and Scholarships in Departmental Disciplines 

Architecture 

Alpha Rho Chi Award in Architecture 

American Institute of Architects School Medals 

AIA/AIAF Scholarship 

Edward B. Arrants Award in Architecture 

Rosemary Watkin Barrick Traveling Fellowship 

James H. Chillman. Jr.. Prizes 

John Crowder Memorial Scholarship 

William D. Darden Medal 

M. N. Davidson Fellowships 

Featherlite Scholarship in Architecture 

Margaret Everson Fossi Traveling Fellowship 

Gensler Scholarship 

Gene Hackerman Scholarship 

Jesse H. Jones Scholarship in Architecture 

Jameson Fellowship 

Roderick M. Jones Scholarship 

McGinty Scholarship Fund 

John T. Mitchell Memorial Fund 

Morris R. Pitman Award 

Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts 

Texas Architectural Foundation Awards 

William Ward Watkin Traveling Fellowship 

Art and Art History 

Art Supply Award 
Kyriakouli Bitzes Scholarship 
Dawn M. Gross Award 
Jameson Fellowship 



1 1 8 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Mavis C. Pitman Memorial Prize in Art r,.,^^,^^r,f^'^? 

Christine Croneis Sayres Memorial Art Award 
Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts 
Texas Art Supply Company Award 

Athletics (Honorary Awards) 

George R. Brown Football Awards * 

Emmett Brunson Award 

Jimmy Burke Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Tom Crumpton Award 

Billy Ed Daniels Memorial Fund 

Walter W. Fondren, Jr., Memorial Scholarship 

Gene Hackerman Award 

Catherine Hannah Award 

Joyce Pounds Hardy Award _, ,, 

Walter Banard Joseph and Aline L. Joseph Fund 

Kay Pearson Keating Award 

Eva Jean Lee Award 

Joe F. Lipscomb Freshman Award --' — - 

Nancy Mauney Mafrige Athletic Scholarship 

George Martin Award 

T. S. Martino Scholarship ' *" 

Leigh Masterson Award for Golf eiuijd!' 

Harry W. McCormick Scholarship jM looria? 

Dell Morgan Award ' n 

Jess Neely Football Awards yiuio^iifiyf ■'■ '^ ■ 

Neely-Davis Scholarships woHgT §nilv 

John Plumbley Memorial Award 

Hally Beth Poindexter Award qirisi 

Robert Pilcher Quin Award 

"R" Association Award 

Stancliff Award 

Albert M. Tomforde. Sr. Athletic Scholarship 

Hugh C. Welsh Scholarship 

Billy Wohn Award 

also 3ioJD9Jirl3iA ni 

Bing Crosby Loan Fund 

qld^^etofi 

Bioengineering and Bioscience 

John W. Cox Research Fund for Scholarship and Fellowships in Bioengineering and 
Biosciences 

Business Administration 

J. Kenneth Arthur Scholarshm 

Houston Society oi' Financial Analysts Sholarship Award 

Jones Graduate School Alumni Association Scnolarship 

Leon Nad Memorial Scnolarsnip 

Lawrence J. O'Connor Scholarship Fund 



119 
Chemistry 

Bertha and Zevi Salsburg Awards 

Computer Science 

Torczon Scholarship 

Drama/Theater/English 

Academy of American Poets Prize 
Barbara L. Chilton Scholarship 
Susan T. Scanlon Scholarship , 

Economics 

Blanche Randall Haden Scholarship 
Omicrom Delta Epsilon Economics Essay Prize 
Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award 
Ervin Kenneth Zingler Scholarship 

Education 

Donald I. Wood Award 

Engineering 

Herbert Allen Merit Award 

American Institute of Chemical Engineers, South Texas Section, Scholarship 

R. C. Baker Foundation Scholarships 

George R. Brown Scholarship 

Brown Scholarships in Engineering 

Harriana Butler Scholarship 

Alan Chapman Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering 

Gerard A. Dobelman Memorial Scholarship 

Steven G. Dobelman Memorial Scholarship 

Albert Fanestiel Scholarship 

Gulf Foundation Scholarship 

Joe M. Hamner Scholarship 

Lillian Haynie Scholarship 

Houston Engineering and Scientific Society Scholarship 

Paul N. Howell Annual Award in Chemical Engineering 

Charles Francis Cyrus Johnson Scholarship 

Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Scholarship 

A. C. Lederer, Jr., Scholarship in Civil Engineering 

Paul Alois Lederer Scholarship in Civil Engineering 

Mason G. Lockwood Engineering Scholarship 

Lottman Scholarship 

McDermott Incorporated Scholarship 

Gilbert A. Metz Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering 

W. L. Moody, Jr., Scholarships in Engineering 

Thomas W. Moore Scholarship in Chemical Engineering . ; 



120 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Bemey L. Morgan Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering 

W. H. Muery Scholarship Fund in Electrical Engineering 

NL Industries Scholarship :,'^:i-^>i 

National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering 

National Society of Professional Engineers Scholarship 

Oshman Scholarships for Women in Engineering 

Lawrence A Petty and Lavine M. Petty Scholarship in Civil Engineering 

Meg Perkins Memorial Scholarship in Engineering 

Rice Engineering Alumni Outstanding Engineering Student Awards t^miilCi 

Hershel M. Rich Invention Award 

Dwane M. Rivers Scholarship in Engineering ssm - 

Shell Incentive Funds Scholarship ' 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel T. Sikes Scholarship in Mechanical Engineering 'U2 

Samuel T. Sikes, Jr., Scholarship in Engineering 

James Redding Sims Scholarship in Civil Engineering ?^iinofioo3 

Randy T. Reese Memorial Scholarship , , , _ 

Sohio Scholarship qidz^lorioZ nabi..^ 

Texaco Scholarship 

USX Foundation Scholarship ... 

Louis J. Walsh Scholarships/Fellowships in Engineering '■"- -'a'ii^ r^ann;;.'. niviJ 

James S. Waters Creativity Award 

noil£3 

English imwA booW .1 bl£ 

Lady Geddes Competition in Writing 

Genevieve Parkhill Lykes Scholarship ^^ 

bifiwA J. 

French . 3T riJuo2 ,zi33ni§n3 katmsriO^o 

Alliance Francoise Scholarship .qid.i^iodoZ noiiB 

Clyde Ferguson Bull Traveling Fellowship ^._ ^ 

Pi Delta Phi Andre Bourgeois Award 
William J. Reckling Memorial Scholarship 



9nn'>3. 



Geology and Geophysics 

Chevron Scholarship 

Devlin-Schnable Memorial Scholarship 

Leroy Caleb Gibbon Award 

Houston Geological Society Outstanding Scholar Award 

W.M. Keck Foundation Fellowship in Geology and Geophysics 

Eugene A. Merten Memorial Award 

Torkild Rieber Award 

Torkild Rieber Scholarship 

W.A. Tarr Certificate 

Sam P. Worden Award ^f"'' 

German and Slavic Studies 

Max Freund Prize in German 

Dr. and Mrs. Mitchel Fellowship for German and Russian 
Language Study Abroad 



121 
History 

Kyriakouli Bitzes Scholarship - , ' . 

Mary Hayes Ewing Publication Prize in Southern History 

Charles Garside Memorial Award in History 

Jameson Fellowship 

Barbara Field Kennedy Prize in American History 

Clifford Lefton Lawrence Award in British History 

Captain Charles Septimus Longcope Award 

Susie Smith Vandiver Scholarship 

Willoughby C. Williams Scholarship 

Human Performance and Health Sciences 

G. L. Hermance Award in Physical Education 
Jill Pitman Jones Award 

Humanities 

Catherine Goodrich Fay Scholarship 

Managerial Studies 

Andersen Consulting Award in Managerial Studies 
H. Russell Pitman Award in Managerial Studies 
Wall Street Journal Student Achievement Award 

Mathematical Science 

Torczon Scholarship 

Mathematics 

Hubert E. Bray Prize in Mathematics 
Willoughby C. Williams Scholarship 

Military Science 

American Legion for General Military Excellence Awards 

American Legion/Andrew Jackson Memorial Award 

Houston Chamber of Commerce Military Affairs Committee Award 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Award 

Reserve Officer Association Award Scholarship 

Society of American Military Engineers Award -^ • 

Society of American Military Engineers William S. Bailey Scholarship 

Sons of the American Revolution Scholarship 

Music 

Ralph A. Anderson Scholarship for Chamber Music 
Denson Endowed Scholarship for Percussion 
Elva Kalb Dumas Prize in Music 
Lillian H. Duncan Prize in Piano 



122 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Frederick Royal Gibbons Memorial Award *"- r^ciing 

William E. and Elva F. Gordon Scholarship g 

Erwin and Emily Heinen Prize in Music ' ' ' .■ .? 

Winifred and Maurice Hirsch Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Hudspeth Violin Scholarship 

Mary Root Kirkland Prize in Voice 

Gwendolyn Jaster Lederer Scholarship in Piano 

Larry J. Livingston Prize in Violin 

Bertha Mallard Scholarship for Music Composition 

Willie M. Muery Scholarship in Music 

Dr. Joseph A. and Ida Kirkland Mullen Scholarships vV 

Rex Shanks, Jr. Memorial Scholarship in Music 

Sallie Shepherd Perkins Prize in Music jj 'j-jafi* 

Burt Duke Raiza Prize in Piano 

Shepherd Society Awards and Scholarships <^^ ^^ ^ 

Dorothy Richard Starling Scholarships in Violin ^"i^- '' 

Naval Science 

American Defense Preparedness Association Scholarship (ADPA) • P^it- ^ 

Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association Awards 

Chief of Naval Education and Training Scholarship (CNET) -jjuujci • 

Distinguished Naval Graduate Award 

Mary Henry Gibson Scholarship 

Jesse H. Jones Naval Scholarships 

Commander F.C. Johnson Award ^a n.^oujc ii. -V 

Military Affairs Committee, Houston Chamber of Commerce Award 

Navy League Award '* 

Reserve Officers Association Award , 

C. Grady Smith Memorial Award 

Society of American Military Engineers Award j. 

Texas Society — Sons of the American Revolution Award ^ 

United Services Automobile Association Scholarship Award 

United States Naval Academy Alumni Association Award 

Philosophy 

Jacob and Babette Atlas Prize in Moral Philosophy 

Frank Moser and Professor R.A. Tsanoff Scholarship lA 

Hilda Atlas Rich Scholarship 

Tsanoff Undergraduate Essay Prizes 

Physics 

William and Elva Gordon Scholarship 
Claude W. Heaps Prize in Physics 

Political Science 

Charles Breckenridge Parkhill Scholarship in Political Science 



123 



Religious Studies 



Aparicio Prize 

Edith Jo Leeseman Dissinger Scholarship 

Rice Institute for Policy Analysis 

Shell Scholar in Public Policy 

Science 

Lillian and Carl Illig Scholarships . , 

Meg Perkins Memorial Scholarship in Science .; , . • ^,, 

Sociology r; : V -: 

Walter and Helen Hall Prize V ^ 

Weber-Durkheim Prize for Excellence in Sociology 

Spanish, Portuguese, and Classics 

Barzan Scholarship for Summer Study Abroad 

Ruth Lee Kennedy Fellowship for Studies in the Golden Age of Spanish Literature 

Sacks Scholarship for Summer Study Abroad 

Summer Program in Spain Scholarship . .. - .. 

Tsanoff Scholarship for Summer Study Abroad "- ^ ; ....... 

Robert Wells Scholarship for Summer Study Abroad ' /" ,'1 



College Awards (Some Honorary) , , ,,, ^ ', 

Marie Alexander Leadership Award ; 

Athenian Awards ' ''■' '■''•' 

Donald R. Baker Scholarships - ' - ' "-V"'' '■ ' ' ' 

H. E. Bray Freshman Award 

Franz and Frances Brotzen Award 

Patrick Gordon Memorial Award ' ^ 

Joe M. Hamner Scholarship 

J. Dennis Huston Sports Award ■ 

Jones College Scholarships 

Jones Master and President Award 

Leeds Award for Excellence in Scholarship 

John E. Parish Fellowship 

Richardson College Master's Award for Excellence in Scholarship 

Z. W. Salsburg Award 

Jackie Schnell Memorial Scholarship 

Graham C. Stebbings College Service Award 

Corrinne and Radoslav Tsanoff Sophomore and Junior Prizes 

Harry Carothers and Olga Keith Wiess Scholarship 

Olga Keith Wiess Award 

S. P. Worden Endowment for Will Rice Award 



!.:.-! ,'\i:-- 



124 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

"^ In addition to the above awards. Rice is invited to nominate students for several 
scholarships and fellowships which provide funds for foreign study and travel or later 
graduate work. Final selections for these awards are made nationally or regionally. 

Edwin, Frederick, and Walter Beinecke Memorial Scholarship 

Churchill Scholarships 

Danforth Fellowships Fulbright-Hays Scholarships 

Goliard Travel Scholarship 

Latin American Scholarship Program of American Universities, Inc. (LASPAU) 

Scholarships 
Henry Luce Scholarships 
Marshall Scholarships (British) 

Rhodes Scholarship (British) • "• q^(^^■^r.\on■jt ianomshA , 

Shennan, Texas Travel Award 

Harry S. Truman Scholarships 'CSIO 

Thomas J. Watson Fellowships 

Woodrow Wilson Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship in Women's Studies ' 

Zonta International Amelia Earhart Aerospace Award 

Honor Societies 



The Phi Beta Kappa society was founded in 1776 at the College of William and 
Mary for the purpose of recognizing intellectual achievement and the love of learning 
among students in the liberal arts and sciences. The Rice University chapter was 
formally installed on March 1, 1929. 

Phi Lambda Upsilon, an honorary chemical society, promotes high scholarship 
and original investigation in all branches of pure and applied chemistry. The Rice 
chapter was installed in 1927. 

The Pi Delta Phi society, organized to interest students of French in competing for 
high standing in scholarship, authorized in May 1930 the formation of the Theta 
chapter of Rice. 

The Society of Sigma Xi, for the promotion of research in science, established the 
Beta of Texas chapter at Rice on March 23, 1938. 

The Tau Beta Pi Association, organized to interest engineering students in 
competing for high standing in scholarship, created the Gamma of Texas chapter at the 
University on December 18, 1940. 

Delta Phi Alpha was founded to promote an interest in the German language and 
literature. The National Council authorized the Gamma Xi Chapter at Rice in April 
1949. 

Sigma Delta Pi was founded to promote an interest in the Spanish language and 
literature. The Rice University chapter was installed on May 14, 1953. 

Tau Sigma Delta is a national honor society in architecture and applied arts. The 
Tau Chapter was established at Rice on May 7, 1961. 

Eta Kappa Nu was founded in 1904 at the University of Illinois for electrical 
engineering students. The purpose was not just to stimulate and reward scholarship, 
but to assist and encourage it members to grow professionally throughout their entire 
lives. The Rice chapter was installed January 1981. 



125 



Omicron Delta Epsilon was founded to promote study in economics. The Rice 
University chapter was established in 1981. 

Psi Chi was founded in 1929 at Yale University to encourage, stimulate, and 
maintain excellence in scholarship, and to advance the science of psychology. The 
Rice University chapter was installed on April 23, 1990. 



Student Life 

Student Responsibility 

Each Rice student is expected to observe standards of conduct consistent with 
respect for the law. the fulfillment of contractual obligations, consideration for the 
rights of others, and a high level of personal integrity. Though the University does not 
intend to supervise the personal lives of its students, all members of the University 
community should be aware that their behavior both on and off campus will reflect on 
the University. 

The student government, the judicial system, and the honor system depend on a 
willing exercise of responsibility and honor on the part of everyone. 

The University reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any student whose 
conduct may be judged clearly detrimental to the best interests of either the student or 
the University. Such action is taken only after careful consideration by the appropriate 
branches of the student government and/or the faculty and administration. 

No individual or group may use the name of the University or one of its colleges 
without prior approval of the University and the college. 



The Honor System 

One of the oldest and proudest traditions at Rice is an honor system administered 
by a student Honor Council whose members are elected annually by the student body. 
Adopted by a vote of the student body in 1916. the system has remained essentially 
unchanged except for changes in the procedures and membership of the Honor 
Council. 

All written examinations and any specifically designated assignments are con- 
ducted under the honor code. The student body, through its commitment to the honor 
system, accepts responsibility for assuring the validity of all examinations and 
assignments conducted under the system. The Honor Council is responsible for 
investigtation of all reported violations and for trial in those cases when the facts 
warrant. The Dean of Students reviews the results of investigations and trials and acts 
upon recommendations for penalties. The Honor Council conducts a continuing 
program to orient new students and faculty to the responsibilities and privileges of the 
system. 



Residential Colleges - 

Every undergraduate student, whether living on campus or not, is a member of one 
of eight residential colleges, all of which are coeducational. 



126 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Each college has a faculty master who occupies a house adjacent to the college. 
The master, whose authority derives from the president of the University, has overall 
responsibility for all aspects of student life in the college. He or she is especially 
responsible for encouraging broad cultural and intellectual interests and for promoting 
self-discipline and effective self-government within the college. Other members of the 
faculty are invited, upon agreement of the student members and the master, to become 
resident and non-resident associates of the college. Faculty associates act as advisers 
to the members and participate in the camaraderie and activities of the college. 
Colleges also have nonfaculty university associates and community associates from 
the Houston area, drawn from various professions. 

Each college is a self-governing group of students whose elected officers and 
representatives are responsible to the master and to the college membership for 
directing a variety of cultural, social, and athletic activities, for the appropriate and 
responsible expenditure of college funds, and for maintaining good order in the 
college. While uniformity among the colleges has never been sought, and each college 
has developed its own particular interests and character, all seek to foster fellowship 
among their members and a mature sense of honor, responsibility, and sound 
judgment. 

Upon acceptance by the University, each undergraduate student is designated a 
member of one of the colleges. Two students who are entering Rice for the first time 
may ask to be assigned to the same college but may not designate which college. A new 
student may request membership in the same college as a close relative. No other 
choice of college is allowed. 

The buildings of each college include a dining hall and public rooms, which are 
available to both resident and nonresident members, and living quarters for approxi- 
mately 2 1 5 students from all classes of the University and all academic disciplines. At 
present, on-campus residential space is available for most of the first-year students 
who request it, but space is not assured until receipt of formal notification. Continuing 
students draw for the available space by the priority and lottery system established in 
each college since the demand exceeds the available space. 

The College Food Service provides meals on an a la carte basis. The Service 
provides three meals per day Monday through Friday and continental breakfast and 
brunch on Saturday and Sunday. Meals are not served during the Thanksgiving 
holidays, mid-year, fall and spring mid-term recesses and spring holidays. Information 
on optional meal plans is available from the Service. Other services provided for 
students living in the Colleges include: ( 1 ) assistance with special diets prescribed by 
a physician, (2) sack lunches for students who must miss a meal due to a job conflict, 
(3) sick trays for students when requested by the Student Health Service, and (4) 
alternate menu entree, whenever possible, in accordance with students' religious 
practices. 



College Courses 

As one of their important activities, individual colleges sponsor courses and 
workshops open to all students. College courses are initiated by students in the colleges 
during the semester before they are offered. Following approval by the master and 
faculty associates of the college and by the Vice-President for Student Affairs, they are 
accepted for academic credit on the same basis as departmental courses and listed by 
the Registrar each semester during preliminary registration. 



127 

College workshops carry no academic credit and do not appear on a student's 
permanent record. Generally designated for instruction in practical skills, they may 
meet on a regular schedule throughout the semester or be offered as short courses. 

By expanding the course offerings of the departments, college courses promote the 
academic involvement of the colleges and provide opportunity for interdisciplinary 
topics of particular interest to students. 



Student Government 

All undergraduates are members of the Rice Student Association, which is 
governed through the Student Senate, composed of the president, two vice-presidents, 
the secretary, treasurer, the eight college presidents, and eight college senators. 

Alleged violations of University or college rules are handled in accordance with 
the University Code of Judicial Procedure. In most cases, original jurisdiction is 
assigned to student courts, appeal from whose verdict may be made to the college 
master, the dean of students, or the University Review Board as appropriate. Final 
appeal is to the president of the University. The Honor Council, which is composed 
entirely of students, administers the honor system and conducts hearings and trials for 
alleged offenses against it. The University retains ultimate authority in all matters of 
discipline and over all actions affecting its educational function or the safety and well- 
being of members of the University community. 

The Student Association annually presents two coveted awards, one to a student 
and one to a faculty or staff member. The Rice Service Award, a memorial to Hugh 
Scott Cameron, first dean of students at Rice, is awarded to currently enrolled or former 
members of the Student Association who have rendered distinguished service to the 
student body. Selection is made by a committee of faculty and students appointed by 
the association. The Mentor Recognition Award recognizes extraordinary service to 
the student body by a current member of the faculty or staff. 



Student Activities 

The Office of Student Activities, located in the RMC Cloisters, oversees various 
campus-wide student organizations' activities in addition to administering the student 
health insurance program, senior rings, student requests for facilities and party 
permits. Major student organizations include the Student Association, the student- 
governing body: the Rice Program Council, which sponsors various events of current 
interest to the student body as well as social functions: and KTRU. the student-run 
radio station, operating 24-hours. seven days per week on FM stereo. Student 
publications include the Rice Thresher, newspaper: the Campanile, yearbook: and the 
University Blue, literary publication. 

A large number of student organizations provide tor special interests, such as the 
Black Student Union, the Hispanic Association for Cultural Education at Rice, the 
Chinese Student Association. Rice Young Democrats and Rice Republicans. There 
are also sports clubs for sailing, rugby, lacrosse, volleyball and soccer. Other special 
interest groups include pre-med, pre-law, forensic society and the juggling club. 

.Many organizations are associated with special academic and professional 
disciplines, such as foreign language clubs, the student affiliates of the American 
Institute of .A.rchitects. the American Chemical Society, the American Institute of 
Physics, the American Society of Civil Engineers, and the American Society of 
.Mechanical Ensineers. 



128 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

The Rice Players is an extracurricular theater group composed of Rice students, 
faculty and staff. The Players present at least four productions each year and welcome 
participation by anyone interested in any aspect of theater production or management. 

Rice students are also affiliated with a number of religious organizations. These 
include, but are not limited to, the Baptist Student Union, Canterbury Association, 
Catholic Student Association. Christian Science Organization, Hillel Society, Lutheran 
Student Association, Intervarsity Christian Fellowship and the Wesley Foundation. 
Many of these clubs are assisted by local clergy, who form the Joint Campus Ministry. 

The Student Organizations' Office, 2nd floor, Ley Student Center, houses the 
mailboxes for all student organizations. 



Rice Student Volunteer Program 

Established in 1985, the Rice Student Volunteer Program (RSVP) is a student- 
run, staffed organization that involves Rice students, staff, and faculty in community 
service. Volunteers tutor in area schools, help adults learn to read, get involved with 
environmental, hunger and homelessness issues, participate in alternative breaks, 
teach CPR, and develop their own programs on campus. 



The Student Health and Counseling Services 

The Student Health Service fee, paid annually by undergraduate and graduate 
students, makes available to students both the Student Health Service and the Rice 
Counseling Center. The care and services provided by the Health Service and the Rice 
Counseling Center are described in information available from either Service or from 
the Office of Student Activities. 

The Student Health Service is an outpatient primary care clinic located on campus 
in the north wing of Hanszen College. The clinic is staffed by two physicians and two 
nurses. Clinic hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday-Friday through the 
undergraduate school year. 

After hours and weekend medical care is available at a number of local hospitals. 
Students are encouraged to review their insurance coverage and decide which of the 
available options would be most appropriate in the event medical care were necessary. 
Students are respincible for all medical bills for bleed tests, x-rays, outside physician 
care, etc. 

In serious emergencies call the Health Service (University extension x4966 
during work hours) or the Campus Police (x6000). 

The Health Service is open from the first day of Orientation Week until the day 
before Commencement. The Health Service is closed during the Christmas break and 
Thanksgiving and Easter weekends, but is open during mid-term breaks in the 
mornings only. 

The Health Service provides the following: 

1 . Primary care for illness and injury with referral to specialist when needed. 

2. Maintenance of health record for all students and administration of immuni- 
zations. 

3. Contraceptive counseling and routine Pap Smears. 

4. Administration of allergy injections with serum provided by student after 
specialist allergy work-up. 

5. Physical examinations for employment, transfer to another school, scholar- 
ship expeditions. 



129 

Confidentiality. The Student Health physician/patient relationship and confi- 
dentiality is absolute, except where the individual student may be deemed a significant 
health risk to other students. 

All Rice students are required to have health insurance. Insurance may be 
purchased through the University at two levels of coverage, described in a brochure 
that is sent to incoming and returning students each summer. Brochures and applica- 
tions may also be obtained from the Cashier's Office or the Office of Student 
Activities. Rice's group coverage will be effective from 12:01 a.m., August 15, 1992, 
until 12:01 a.m., August 15, 1993. Dependent coverage is also available. If you have 
other medical insurance, a waiver card showing proof of insurance must be signed and 
returned to the Cashier's Office by August 15, prior to the beginning of classes, to 
avoid automatic billing for coverage. 

The Rice Counseling Center, located at 301 A Lovett Hall is open year-round 
between 8:30-noon, 1 -5 p.m. M-F. The Center provides short-term individual, group 
and couples counseling to currently enrolled students at no additional charge. Stu- 
dents often seek counseling for academic difficulties, family problems, self-identity 
issues, anxiety about interpersonal relationships and sexuality, feelings of loneliness, 
low self-esteem and depression, and substance abuse problems. When it is clear that 
more prolonged counseling or treatment is necessary, the individual may be referred 
to an outside provider at his or her own expense or as covered by health insurance. 

An appointment to see a counselor may be made either by phone or in person at 
the Center. Counseling services provided by the RCC are confidential except in cases 
where students are in imminent danger to themselves or others. 

The Center also offers educational programming and consultation to the Rice 
community. Crisis intervention is available 24 hours a day. Call the Center's 
telephone number, 527-4867, for after-hours emergency assistance. Students with 
psychological or psychiatric emergencies are referred to Methodist Hospital. 

Brochures describing the Health Service, Counseling Center, and student health 
insurance are available in the Health Service Office, the Counseling Center Office, and 
in the Office of Student Activities. 



The Fondren Library 

With a collection of some 1 .5 million volumes, more than 2 million microforms, 
and 12,500 current periodical and other serial titles, the Fondren Library is strongly 
committed to supporting the research and information needs of Rice's students and 
faculty, and it provides extensive resources for advanced study and research. Among 
the notable research collections are the Menil Collection in art and art history, the 
Nadler German language and literature collection, as well as strong collections in 
Austrian history, architecture, engineering, American history, French literature, and 
the natural sciences and engineering. Bibliographic access is provided through 
LIBRIS, the Fondren's automated catalog. 

The library is also a depository for United States Government documents and for 
United States patents, as well as a University affiliate for the U.S. Census data. The 
Woodson Research Center is the repository of the library's rare books, manuscripts, 
and University archives. Special collections, including Civil War imprints, Texana, 
eighteenth century English drama, the papers and scientific library of Sir Julian 



1 30 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Huxley, the Anderson Collection on the History of Aeronautics, as well as numerous 
literary and historical manuscript holdings are available for research at the center. 
Large microform sets of research materials such as Early American Imprints, papers 
of a number of United States presidents, and newspapers are also available. 

The Fondren's open shelf policy enables patrons to locate materials easily. The 
reference/collection development librarians provide assistance in the use of library 
materials and in computer searches of over nine hundred subject data bases. Special 
facilities such as individual study carrels, group study rooms, audio-visual facilities, 
electronic work stations, microform reading carrels, and photoduplicating equipment 
are also available in the library. 



The Rice Memorial Center — Ley Student Center 

The Rice Memorial Center, built through the generosity of friends and alumni, 
was dedicated on Homecoming weekend in the fall of 1958. The Ley Student Center 
was added through similar generosity and dedicated in the fall of 1986. The Rice 
Memorial Chapel is an integral part of the student center complex. 

The Student Center serves as a gathering place for students and the University 
community, providing a variety of services, offices, and meeting facilities. The Rice 
Memorial Center houses the Association of Rice Alumni, the Career Services Center, 
the Office of Residence Life, the Rice Campus Store, Sammy's Cafeteria and Snack 
Bar, the Rice University Bands, and Willy's Pub. The Cloisters area houses the Office 
of Student Activities, Office of Health Education, Office of Multicultural Affairs, the 
Rice Student Volunteer Program (RSVP), the Chapel Reading Room, and the Rayzor 
Memorial Chapel. The Ley Student Center is the home of the Office of Academic 
Advising, the Office of Student Organizations, the Student Association, the Interna- 
tional Student Organization, the Graduate Student Association, Rice's radio station 
KTRU, the Thresher, the Campanile, the Rice Program Council and various other 
student organizations. 

The Student Center meeting facilities are available to the University community 
for meetings, parties, dinners, concerts, weddings and special events. The Grand Hall, 
Famsworth Pavilion. Brown Garden. Rayzor Memorial Chapel, Kelley Lounge, Ray 
Memorial Court, Miner Lounge, Meyer Conference Room and other facilities provide 
a variety of spaces for formal and informal meetings and special events. 



Career Services Center 

The Career Services Center is a full service career center offering a variety of 
services to undergraduates, graduate students and alumni of the University. These 
services are designed to help everyone in the university community from liberal arts 
majors to engineers. 

Among the centers activities is career counseling for those unable to decide on 
a career or graduate program to pursue or explore, and for those who need assistance 
and direction m the path thev have chosen. Career testing is also available for those 
mterested in a more analytical approach to career decision making. Peer counselors are^ 
available to assist students with resume writing, interviewing and job search strate- 
gies. Workshops, career panels, and a number of career fairs are sponsored by the 
Career Services Center each year to provide information on career areas for students. 
Details on individual events are publicized throughout the campus and through the 
Career News, a publication of the center. 



131 

Located within the Career Services Center is the Career Library. The library has 
a substantial collection of resources and literature on careers and occupations in many 
areas, locating and securing employment, summer jobs, company information, and 
graduate schools. These resources are also helpful in determining areas of career 
exploration. 

Internships may be obtained through the Joint Venture program of the Career 
Services Center. Internships can be a vital part of a college education and students are 
encouraged to apply for these opportunities through the center. 

A great many representatives from business, industry, and other employing 
organizations visit the center each year for prospective summer and full-time employ- 
ees. Students register and schedule interview dates and times through the Center. 
Listings for full, part-time, and summer jobs are also available in the Career Library. 

Office of Multicultural Affairs 

Located in the cloisters of the Rice Memorial Center, the Office of Multicultural 
Affairs represents a deliberate, programmatic response to the academic, social and 
recreational needs of ethnic minority students at Rice. Charged primarily with 
providing counseling and support, the Office also ser\'es as a reference and resource 
center with a library of guides and information on graduate schools, jobs, fellowships, 
internships and other opportunities available to minority students once beyond the 
Rice community. The Office further serves to oversee cross-cultural programming for 
the campus, and to promote the education and celebration of issues related to cultural 
diversity. Programming is designed to enhance the University's efforts to recruit and 
retain more minority students. 



Health Education Office (HEO) 

The Health Education Office delivers a variety of services to students and faculty. 
Programming includes, but is not limited to. sexual health awareness, substance abuse 
prevention, nutrition and diet, and acquaintance rape issues. Additionally, the HEO 
offers students private consultations and a resource room containing health-related 
literature (brochures, journals, posters, etc.). Students actively volunteer with the 
HEO for positions such as Sexual Health Peer Instructors, Students Organized Against 
Rape (SOAR) and Health Representatives for their colleges. The Health Education 
Office is located in the Rice Memorial Center Cloisters. 



Intercollegiate Athletics 

A charter member of the Southwest Athletic Conference and a Division I-A 
member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, Rice fields teams in football, 
basketball, baseball, cross country, indoor and outdoor track, swimming, tennis, and 
golf for men — and in basketball, volleyball, cross country, indoor and outdoor track, 
swimming, and tennis for women. Home football games are played in the beautiful 
70,000 seat Rice Stadium. Autry Court for basketball and volleyball. Cameron Field 
for baseball, the Jake Hess Tennis Stadium and the Rice Track Stadium round out a 
complex of outstanding athletic facilities. Dedicated to the pursuit of high-level 
athletic goals for true student-athletes. Rice prides itself on its dual goal of excellence 
in both the academic program and the athletic arena, and refuses to use the rigors of 
either as an excuse for less than high quality performance in the other. 



132 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 



Intramural Sports 

The Department of Human Performance and Health Sciences offers a supervised 
program of intramural sports for all students, faculty and staff. An individual may 
participate in individual, dual, team sports, swim meets, and track and field events. 
Any interested students, faculty and staff may form teams for the wide variety of 
tournaments. A student may compete in the University intramural tournaments and/ 
or represent his/her college in the college team sports tournaments which follow the 
open tournaments. In the past few years, over 6,000 entries from the student population 
have participated in 53 tournaments. (Students participate at their own risk.) 

Sports Clubs 

The Department of Human Performance and Health Sciences administers a 
Sports Club Program. A sports club is a special interest group organized to engage in 
and promote interest in a recreational physical activity. Club organization is depen- 
dent upon student interest. In 1992 clubs were organized in badminton, cricket, 
cycling, fencing, lacrosse, martial arts, rowing, rugby, soccer, sailing, SCUBA, 
squash, and volleyball. These groups are formed to increase individual and team skills 
through a continuing instructional and competitive program. Club activities are 
supported by individual contributions, membership dues, University funds, and fund- 
raising activities. (Students participate at their own risk.) 

Student Automobiles 

All student vehicles must be registered with the Traffic Division of the Rice 
University Police Department. Students must park in assigned areas and observe 
University regulations. Illegally parked or unregistered vehicles are subject to tow 
away and/or fines assessed by the University. Copies of the University Traffic and 
Parking Regulations, which detail student privileges and responsibilities, may be 
obtained from the Traffic Division of the University Police. Students must inform all 
guests of parking regulations as repeat violators are subject to towaway. 



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Information Systems 



Office of Administrative Computing 

The Office of Administrative Computing is in charge of providing computing 
services to the administrative departments and others that may request them and of 
coordinating the administrative computing activities and strategies across campus. 
The Office maintains its own local area network and is involved in a number of 
strategic projects to determine and fulfill present and future administrative needs 
throughout the University. 

:l 
3 



■ y ■■ ■■■' ■ ■■'■?n :■;■:''.: "H 133 

Office of Networking and Computing Systems 

Networking and Computing Systems designs, builds and operates the Rice 
campus network, known as Rice Internet, and manages several of the major compu- 
tational resources attached to it. The Office also provides operational support of the 
SesquiNet regional network under an arrangement with its sponsors. 

The Computer and Network Operations Group monitors the network and selected 
computer systems to assure their proper operation and maintains the public computer 
lab facilities supported by Information Systems. Through its Technical Services 
section, it is responsible for construction of the network. Staffed around the clock, the 
Operations Center serves as a focal point for reporting problems with the network, its 
external connections, and facilities managed by Information Systems. 

The Network and Systems Support Group evaluates, installs, maintains and, in 
some cases, creates the software to support networking, network services and the 
various campus computing systems, including the ES/9000. Owlnet, Research Sun 
Lab and Rice Advanced Visualization Laboratory. This group provides technical 
expertise to support the information dissemination and consulting activities of the 
Office of Computing Information Services and other campus groups. 



Office of Computing Information Services 

Responsible for the collection and dissemination of computing information on 
campus. Computing Information Services provides consultation, documentation, 
training and reference areas to support the computing services required for the 
scholarly and administrative activities of the university. Environments supported 
include micro, mainframe/mid-level, and high performance computers and their 
associated software and access systems. Computing Information Services provides 
assistance and information for a variety of campus and off campus computing 
resources as well as information for purchasing and managing individual and depart- 
mental resources. This office also provides feedback and evaluation to providers of 
computing services. 

Computing Information Services manages several microcomputer classrooms 
and laboratories open to the Rice community and provides overall business and 
planning services for the Information Systems offices and distributed laboratories. 

Projects which benefit from campus coordination such as site licenses, discount 
programs, joint proposals, campus standards, and some investigations into new 
software, technologies and products are also undertaken in this office. 



Campus Computing Labs 

Mudd Lab - microcomputer classrooms and labs open to the Rice community. 
Located in the west wing of the Mudd Building, this laboratory includes software 
libraries and demonstration materials for Apple Macintosh and IBM PS2 equip- 
ment. 

Center for Scholarship and Information - a microcomputer classroom and lab 
located in Fondren Library. 

Social Science Computer Lab - a microcomputer lab designed for the support 
of Social Science faculty, staff, and students located in Sewall Hall. 
Research Sun Lab - an experimental lab of Sun workstations for Rice faculty and 
staff research located in Mudd Lab. 



1 34 INFORMATION FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 

Owlnet - an educational network of the School of Engineering for use by ""'^ 
Engineering students. This lab is located in several sites in Engineering. 
Rice Advanced Visualization Lab - a lab of high powered computer visualiza- 
tion tools for education and research use located in Architecture in Anderson Hall. 
Bonner Lab - a general use microcomputer lab and Owlnet Sun cluster located 
in 55 Bonner Lab. 

Where to go for Further Information 

If you need more information or wish to set up a computing account, stop by the 
Computing Resource Center (CRC) on the first floor of the Mudd Lab. Consultants are 
available to answer your computing questions or guide you to additional resources. 



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135 



Information for 
Graduate Students 



Since the opening of the university in 1912, the importance of graduate study and 
research as a principal means of advancing knowledge has been recognized. The first 
Doctor of Philosophy degree was awarded in 1 9 1 8 in mathematics. Since that time, the 
graduate area has been expanding through the basic sciences, the humanities, 
engineering, the social sciences, architecture, music, and administration and includes 
interdepartmental areas. The number of graduate programs has steadily increased, and 
advanced degrees are now offered in 33 fields of study. 

Graduate programs are of two types, research and professional. Research pro- 
grams lead to the Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Architecture, Master of Arts and 
Master of Science degrees. Professional programs provide advanced course work in 
scientific disciplines, but do not generally include independent research. They lead to 
the degrees of Doctor of Musical Arts, Master in Applied Mathematical Sciences, 
Master of Accounting, Master of Architecture, Master of Architecture in Urban 
Design, Master of Arts in Teaching, Master of Business Administration (which 
includes public and nonprofit management). Master of Chemical Engineering, Master 
of Civil Engineering, Master of Computer Science, Master of Electrical Engineering, 
Master of Environmental Engineering, Master of Environmental Science, Master of 
Materials Science, Master of Mechanical Engineering, Master of Music, and Master 
of Statistics. 

All degrees conferred by the university are awarded solely in recognition of 
educational attainments, not as warranty of future employment or admission to other 
programs of higher education. 



Research Degrees 



The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is awarded for original studies in anthropol- 
ogy, applied physics, biochemistry, biology, chemical engineering, chemistry, civil 
engineering, computer science, economics, electrical and computer engineering, 
English, environmental science and engineering, French, geology. German, history, 
linguistics, materials science, mathematical sciences, mathematics, mechanical engi- 
neering, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, religious studies, statis- 
tics, space physics and astronomy. In architecture, the equivalent degree is the Doctor 



1 36 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

of Architecture. These degrees are awarded after successful completion of at least 90 
semester hours of advanced study and an original investigation reported in an approved 
thesis. As final evidence of preparation for this degree, the candidate must pass a public 
oral examination. The residency requirement (period of full time study at the Univer- 
sity) for the doctorate is four semesters. 

The degree of Master of Arts is available in the various humanities listed above 
plus art history and Spanish and in scientific fields of study, including the social 
sciences. The Master of Science degree may be obtained in the fields of chemical, civil, 
electrical and computer engineering, mechanical engineering, computer science, 
environmental science and engineering, materials science/engineering, and space 
physics and astronomy. The Master of Architecture, Master of Architecture in Urban 
Design, and Master of Music are also offered as research degrees, with a thesis option. 

The Master of Arts or Master of Science degree, or the Master of Architecture or 
Master of Music research degree, may be awarded after completion of at least 30 
semester hours of study, including the thesis, 24 of which must be done at Rice. The 
residency requirement is one semester. Programs generally include original work 
embodied in a thesis, and the candidate's preparation is evidenced by a public 
examination. Most students require three or four semesters to complete such a 
program, although some programs may be longer. In some departments, students may 
be awarded a master's degree on the basis of achieving candidacy for the doctoral 
degree. Students seeking such an award must submit a petition for the degree, signed 
by their department chair, to the Office of Graduate Studies prior to February 1 of the 
year in which the degree is to be awarded. 

Foreign language requirements for the master's and doctoral degrees are estab- 
lished by the individual departments according to the need for foreign languages in the 
conduct of research and scholarship in their respective fields. 

Information on candidacy, the oral defense of thesis, and thesis regulations is 
given under Academic Regulations, beginning on page 143. More specific informa- 
tion about requirements for advanced degrees in each field of study is given under 
department headings in the section of the catalog which begins on page 153. 
Additional material may be obtained from the appropriate department chair. 

Professional Degrees 



Rice University offers several advanced degree programs which prepare students 
for positions in fields such as accounting, business administration, public and 
nonprofit management (see accounting and administrative science), architecture, 
mathematical sciences, computer science, engineering, and secondary education; in 
some departments, such degrees prepare the student for a doctoral level program. In 
addition, a non-thesis Doctor of Musical Arts degree is awarded after completion of 
a program of advanced study and required performances or original compositions. (If 
the field of emphasis is composition, a major work is presented as a thesis.) 

Requirements for these degrees include the successful completion of 30 semester 
hours or more of advanced courses (numbered 300 or higher). At least 24 of these 30 
hours must be taken at Rice. Additional information is presented in this catalog under 
the departmental listings in the Courses of Instruction section beginning on page 153 
and in the Academic Regulations section, beginning on page 143. In each case, 
application materials are available from the department. 



137 

Admission into a professional degree program is granted separately from admis- 
sion into a research or thesis program, and students who wish to change from a thesis 
program to a professional master's program must obtain the specific approval of the 
Office of Graduate Studies. Approval will not normally be granted to students who 
have received university graduate fellowships unless the student can demonstrate 
significant service to the University or its faculty through teaching or research. 
Professional degree programs terminate when the degree is awarded. Students who 
wish to continue in the graduate program after the completion of a professional 
program must reapply for admission into a research or thesis program. 



Accounting and Administrative Science 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration offers two professional 
degrees, the Master of Business Administration (which includes concentrations in 
accounting, business entrepreneurship, finance, international management, manage- 
ment information systems, marketing, operations research, and public and nonprofit 
management) and the Master of Accounting. The Master of Business Administration 
degree program requires two academic years to complete. Students who have taken a 
prescribed set of prerequisite courses as undergraduates may complete the Master of 
Accounting degree program in one year (see page 1 57 for information). Those lacking 
the requisite background complete the first year of the M.B.A. curriculum and then 
take advanced accounting courses in the second year. Alternatively, they may choose 
to take the M.B.A. degree program with an accounting concentration. To qualify for 
either degree, the student must maintain a "B" (3.0) average and may be required to 
pass a special examination during the last semester in residence. There is no thesis 
requirement. 

Applicants must submit scores on the Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT), all college transcripts, and three letters of recommendation, as well as 
specified essays. Unless they received an undergraduate degree from a U.S. college or 
university, foreign nationals whose native language is not English must submit recent 
scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Admission to the Jones 
Graduate School is open to undergraduates from Rice and other universities, regard- 
less of undergraduate major, but is highly selective and limited to those who have 
performed with distinction in their previous academic work and on the GMAT. The 
M.B.A. program requires no specific prerequisite courses for admission; however, 
students may find it beneficial to have a background that includes undergraduate 
course work in principles of accounting, principles of microeconomics, and math- 
ematics. Because spreadsheet and word-processing software is used extensively in 
course work, students should have a thorough understanding of these types of software 
packages before enrolling. Undergraduates contemplating graduate work in account- 
ing should take the prerequisite courses outlined on page 157 in order to complete the 
M.Acco. degree in one year. 

The Jones Graduate School and the George R. Brown School of Engineering offer 
a joint M.B.A./Master of Engineering degree. The non-thesis engineering degree may 
be obtained in departments of chemical engineering, civil engineering, computer 
science, electrical and computer engineering, environmental science and engineering, 
mathematical sciences, mechanical engineering and materials science, and statistics. 
Ordinarily, the engineering degree takes one academic year to complete, whereas the 
M.B.A. requires two. Joint-degree candidates, however, can fulfill requirements for 
both degrees in two academic years and a summer. To enter the joint-degree master's 



1 38 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

program, applicants must be accepted by both the Jones Graduate School and the 
engineering department in which they wish to enroll. The program requires a special 
application which may be obtained from the Jones Graduate School. The Graduate 
Record Examination (GRE), rather than the Graduate Management Aptitude Test 
(GMAT), is required for the joint-degree program, and some engineering departments 
require advanced tests as well. Students whose native language is not English must 
supply scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 



Architecture 

Degrees of Master of Architecture and Master of Architecture in Urban Design are 
offered. Completion of either degree requires two or more academic years. An 
applicant for admission should write to the Dean of the Rice University School of 
Architecture for specific information about the program for which the applicant would 
be qualified by education and experience. Completed application materials include the 
Rice University Application for Graduate Study form, transcript(s). Graduate Record 
Examination scores, a portfolio of the applicant' s work, and a minimum of three letters 
of recommendation. 



Education 

The Master of Arts in Teaching is a professional degree program for students 
wishing to qualify for secondary school teaching following a liberal undergraduate 
education. The program normally requires completion of 1 1 advanced courses with 
grades of "B" or higher. All courses must be approved by the Department of Education. 

Admission requires that the applicant have a bachelor's degree, scholarly ability 
and motivation, and an interest in teaching at the secondary school level. Each 
applicant will be expected to take the Aptitude Test of the Graduate Record Examina- 
tion. Applications are reviewed by members of the Rice University Teacher Education 
Council. Other requirements for the Master of Arts in Teaching are found in the 
Department of Education section of the Courses of Instruction listing. 

Students in the program are not normally eligible for Rice University Graduate 
Fellowships or scholarship support since cooperating school districts pay students a 
salary for internship teaching. However, a limited number of tuition waivers may be 
available. 



Engineering 

Non-thesis master's degrees are offered in the traditional branches of engineering 
listed below and in other departments included in the engineering division: computer 
science, mathematical sciences and statistics. A completed bachelor's degree in a 
relevant field is required for admission. Candidates are required to complete 30 hours 
of approved advanced courses (numbered 300 or higher). These advanced courses 
include at least four at the 500- or 600-level, indicating professional study in depth of 
a particular area. Courses counting toward these 30 hours may not be taken on a pass/ 
fail basis. The student's major department must approve the overall program, and any 
departure from these guidelines must be approved in the Graduate Office. 



'-:,.■.■,:■•■■■.::•:.■ , ■ '■ ■/. . . - ^ 139 

** Chemical Engineering. Flexibility in course planning permits specialization in 
such areas as economics, biochemical engineering, reservoir engineering, process 
control, optimization and systems analysis, applied mathematics, materials science, 
kinetics, and catalysis. 

Civil Engineering. The area of concentration is structures and mechanics. Some 
specialization in solid mechanics, geotechnical engineering, or applied mathematics 
is possible within the structures and mechanics concentration. 

Computer Science. The Master of Computer Science degree requires completion 
of ten advanced courses approved by the Department of Computer Science, in 
accordance with general practices stated under Engineering, above. The program for 
each student is formulated in consultation with a departmental adviser. The areas of 
concentration are algorithms, compiler construction, operating systems, and program- 
ming languages. 

Electrical and Computer Engineering. Technical electives permit some spe- 
cialization in the general areas of bioengineering, communication and control theory, 
electro-optics and physical electronics, and computer science and engineering. 

'' Environmental Science. Major emphasis of the degree program is in the areas 
of environmental biology, environmental chemistry and toxicology, surface and 
ground water hydrology, water and wastewater treatment, environmental geology, and 
environmental planning. 

Environmental Engineering. Major emphasis of the degree program is in the 
areas of hydrology and water resources engineering, water and wastewater treatment 
design and operation, water and wastewater treatment, and numerical modeling. 

Materials Science and Engineering. The student takes an approved program of 
courses in materials science and engineering or related fields plus two appropriate 
electives. Students may enter this degree program following undergraduate prepara- 
tion in any of a number of related fields in addition to materials science/engmeenng. 

Mathematical Sciences. The Master in Applied Mathematical Sciences degree 
requires satisfactory completion of 30 semester hours of approved course work 
beyond a bachelor's degree in an appropriate field. Concentrations are possible m 
numerical analysis, operations research, and physical mathematics. Candidates for 
admission are evaluated on their previous academic records and their poteniial for 
success in and benefit from the professional program. 

Mechanical Engineering. Flexibility in course requirements permits specializa- 
tion in thermal sciences and energy conversion, gas dynamics, hydrodynamics, 
computer-aided design, stress analysis and mechanical behavior of materials md 
aerospace engineenng. .,.i.ii.; _ . . ■ 

Statistics. The Master of Statistics degree requires satisfactory completion »v ^en 
approved courses. Study is in the fields of applied probability, biomathematics dara 
analysis, density estimation, epidemiology, image processing, model building, quaiuy 
conirot. statistical computing, sioctiastic processes, time series analysis. 



140 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Joint Master of Business Administration/Master of Engineering Degree 
Program. The joint MBA/Master of Engineering degree program is designed to allow 
a student to complete an MBA and one of the professional (non-thesis) Master of 
Engineering degrees in approximately 2.5 years. The joint MBA degree can be taken 
in conjunction with any of the professional master's degrees offered in the disciplines 
listed above. The student will be required to complete 76 hours of courses: 24 hours 
in a particular professional master of engineering curriculum and 52 hours in business 
administration. The student must satisfy the entrance requirements of both the Brown 
School of Engineering and the Jones Graduate School. 



Music 

The Shepherd School offers the Master of Music degree in the following areas: 
composition, choral and instrumental conducting, historical musicology, perfor- 
mance, and music theory. An audition is required as part of the admission process for 
instrumental and conducting applicants. Composition majors are required to submit 
a portfolio of their works, and musicology and theory majors should submit samples 
of their written work. The Graduate Record Examination (both the Aptitude and 
Advanced Music Tests) is required of musicology, theory, and composition majors. 
The faculty of the Shepherd School may determine that additional work at the 
undergraduate level is needed. 

The precise minimum hourly requirements for the Master of Music degree vary 
from 43 to 57 according to major area. For a description of the requirements for a 
particular Master of Music degree, write to the Shepherd School of Music, Graduate 
Admissions. 

The Doctor of Musical Arts degree, offered in selected areas, requires 90 hours 
beyond the bachelor's degree. The minimum residency (i.e., period of full-time study 
at Rice) is two semesters for the Master of Music and four semesters (beyond the 
Master of Music degree) for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree. For further 
information on the DMA program, write to The Shepherd School of Music, Graduate 
Admissions. 



Interdisciplinary and Cooperative Programs 

Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs. Opportunities are available for interdis- 
ciplinary study in various aspects of systems theory, solid-state electronics, materials 
science/engineering, and bioengineering. For applications or additional information, 
contact the chair of one of the participating departments as follows: for systems theory, 
the Department of Chemical Engineering, Economics, Electrical and Computer 
Engineering, or Mathematical Sciences; for solid-state electronics and materials 
science/engineering. Chemistry. Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mechanical 
Engineering, or Physics; for bioengineering. Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engi- 
neering, or Mechanical Engineering. 

Applied Physics Program. This joint effort of the Schools of Engineering and 
Natural Sciences grants Master's and Ph.D. degrees in Applied Physics. With a 
curriculum primarily in electrical engineering and physics, its objective is to provide 
a graduate education that prepares students for work in the rapidly-developing new 
areas of physical electronics, lasers and electro-optics, and electronic and optical 



141 

devices and materials. Applied Physics is academically more demanding than most 
graduate programs but permits substantial flexibility in an individual student's choice 
of courses and research topics. For further information, please contact the Rice 
Quantum Institute office at (713) 527-6028. 

Computational Science and Engineering Program. The program will focus 
attention upon modem computational techniques and provide a resource of training 
and expertise in the use of new and powerful computers as an aid to research, 
development, and design. It is designed to provide training, produce practitioners at 
the Masters level, and to advance the field through original research at the Ph.D. level. 
Students must fulfill the admissions requirements of one of the participating depart- 
ments. For an application or additional information, contact either the Department of 
Chemical Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, or 
Mathematical Sciences. 

Joint Graduate Programs with Medical Colleges. Joint programs with the 
Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas Medical School are designed 
to provide educational experiences of high quality leading to research careers in 
medicine. These programs lead to joint M.D./Ph.D. or joint M.D./M.A. or M.D./M.S. 
degrees. Such programs can be worked out individually through various departments. 

Joint Graduate Programs in History and Law. This selective program com- 
bines graduate work in legal and constitutional history at Rice University with 
professional work in law at the University of Houston Law Center, or at the Thurgood 
Marshall School of Law of Texas Southern University. Students in their first or second 
year of law school may apply for admission to Rice through their law school. 
Participants spend one year at Rice in the Master of Arts program concentrating on 
legal and constitutional history. After completing this year of residence and all 
requirements for the M.A. except the thesis, the student returns to law school to finish 
his or her legal studies. During the last year of law school, the student completes a 
suitable M.A. -level research thesis on a topic in legal and/or constitutional history 
selected with the approval of the law school instructor and the student's Rice history 
adviser. The student who completes this program receives a law degree from his or her 
law school as well as an M.A. in history from Rice. 

Joint Graduate Program in Medical Ethics. Under an agreement with the 
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, a cooperative program of 
graduate study in medical ethics is offered, leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in 
religious studies from Rice University. Also, under an agreement with the Baylor 
College of Medicine and the Institute of Religion, a cooperative program in medical 
ethics is offered, leading to the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in philosophy from Rice. 



^ ^' ' Non-degree Programs Class III 

Students with a "B" (3.0) or better grade average and an undergraduate or 
graduate degree from an accredited college or university may apply for admission as 
Class III students to take courses for credit without being admitted to a specific degree 
program. Permission of instructor (and in some cases, a department) and approval by 
the Dean of Graduate Studies are required. 

Courses taken under this arrangement cannot be used to fulfill the requirements 
for a degree at Rice unless and until the student has been accepted into a degree 
program by an academic department (and, in the case of graduate students, by the Dean 
of Graduate Studies), and the department has approved a special request that the Class 



142 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

III course count toward the degree. It is the student's responsibility to ensure that the 
proper appeals have been obtained. Normally, no more than three courses taken as a 
Class III student can be applied toward a graduate degree. Class III students cannot 
take courses on a pass/fail basis. 

An application and course request form can be obtained from the Office of 
Graduate Programs, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas, 77251-1892. 

Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended should be mailed 
directly from previously attended institutions to the Office of Graduate Programs at 
Rice. A student who has attended Rice as a Class III student must still complete 
continuation forms for each semester and submit them by the deadlines. These 
materials will be sent upon request from the Office of Graduate Programs. Deadlines 
for all applications are the respective workdays closest to August 1 and December 1 . 
Applications will not be considered after classes have begun. 

The tuition for 1992-93 is $490 per semester hour for either undergraduate 
courses (100-400 level) or graduate courses (500+ level). In addition, a $50 registra- 
tion fee is due each semester. All fees are payable during registration, which must be 
completed by the end of the second week of class. Persons submitting applications not 
completed by the deadline must pay a late application fee of $50. This late fee will also 
be charged continuing Class III students who do not complete continuation forms by 
the above deadlines. For some courses students may be charged for computer time. If 
a class is filled with degree students. Class III students may be dropped up to the end 
of the third week of class. In that case, the tuition (less $25 of the registration fee) will 
be refunded. The minimum registration for Class III is three hours. 

Because Class III is not a degree granting program, foreign graduate students 
enrolled as Class III students cannot receive visas from Rice University. Persons who 
are B-2 visitors may be ineligible for enrollment as Class III students. A determination 
will be made by the Dean of Graduate Studies and the Foreign Student Advisor. 

Faculty/staff spouses may apply and receive a tuition waiver for undergraduate 
level courses only. Application materials, transcripts, grade point average of "B" or 
better, and a baccalaureate degree are required. Students are responsible for paying 
all fees and observing all deadlines. 

For an application or for further information, please contact the Office of Graduate 
Programs at (713) 527-4002. 

Admission to Graduate Study 

Graduate study is open to well-qualified students who possess adequate back- 
ground in the field of study they wish to pursue. Normally, but not always, the 
equivalent of an undergraduate major in the field is required, but the final judgment 
of preparation rests with the department concerned. The emphasis is on the quality of 
the applicant's preparation rather than on the academic program pursued or credits 
earned in achieving it. 

Applicants for admission to graduate study should address all communications to 
the chair of the appropriate department, who will provide the application form and 
relevant information about the program. The completed form, with transcript and 
recommendations, should be returned to the department chair. Scores on the aptitude 
portion of the Graduate Record Examination (or the Graduate Management Admission 
Test), and an appropriate advanced test if required by the department, should be sent 
directly to the admitting department. In order for these scores to be available at the time 



:. --■ ^n .■■; ■:.. ■ 143 

when admission decisions are normally made, applicants are strongly encouraged to 
take the GRE by December of the year prior to that for which application is being 
made. The application deadline for admission for the Fall semester is February 1. 
However, some departments specify an earlier deadline, and departments may 
occasionally be able to consider late applications. 

Candidates are evaluated on their previous academic records, available test 
scores, and letters of reference from scholars under whom they have studied. 
Additional evidence of qualification to pursue advanced study, such as writing 
samples, portfolios, or statements of purpose, may be required. In addition to any 
specific requirements of the department, the applicant is expected to have at least a "B" 
(3.0) average in undergraduate work and high scores on the Graduate Record 
Examination (or GMAT). Foreign applicants, whose native language is not English, 
must take the TOEFL test, and are not normally admitted if they score below 550. 
Initial decisions regarding admission or denial are made by departmental committees, 
which send recommendations to the Office of Graduate Programs for review. Official 
offers of admission may be made only by the Dean of Graduate Studies. 

Graduate programs at Rice are designed for full-time study, but a limited number 
of students may be admitted on a part-time basis if the department recommends 
making such an exception, and if the Dean of Graduate Studies approves. 

Each graduate student is advised by the departmental chair or an officially 
designated faculty member in planning the initial semester of graduate study. As soon 
as possible, each student should affiliate with a faculty advisor who will help plan both 
the course program and the thesis or special report. 



Academic Regulations 

Residency. The minimum residency (i.e., period of full-time study at Rice) is one 
semester for the M.A. or M.S., and four semesters for the doctorate. 

Leave of Absence. Leave of absence is granted only by the Graduate Office upon 
the recommendation of the department, and is granted only to graduate students in 
good standing with the University. Leave must be approved in advance of the academic 
semester in question; it will not be granted after the student has registered for courses 
or after the registration period has passed. Normally, leave of absence is granted for 
no more than two consecutive semesters. No work toward a degree may be done at Rice 
or involve Rice faculty (or facilities) during a leave of absence. A reinstatement fee of 
$25 is charged upon return from an official leave. 

Minimum Registration. The minimum number of hours for which a student may 
register is three. 

Courses of Study. Graduate students may register for courses of study only with 
the approval of their departmental advisors or chair. Similarly, students are allowed to 
drop or add courses only if departmental approval has been given. 

Full-time Status. Graduate programs at Rice generally require full-time study. 
The semester course load for full-time students is nine hours or more, as required by 
the department. Full-time students may accept other employment only with the 
approval of the department and the Graduate Office. Students who are employed 
elsewhere for more than 20 hours per week are not normally eligible for full-time status 
at Rice. , 



144 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Part-time Study. Part-time students are occasionally admitted by special per- 
mission, usually for non-thesis programs only. Departmental recommendation is 
required. Students enrolling for nine semester hours or more will be considered full- 
time, and full-time tuition will apply. 

Pass/Fail Option. Graduate students may take courses on the pass/fail basis only 
with departmental approval. All other restrictions regarding the pass/fail option, as 
stated on page 95, apply equally to graduate students. Class III students may not take 
courses pass/fail. 

Grade Standards. In order to graduate, students must achieve at least a B- (2.67) 
average on courses counted towards the graduate degree. This is a minimal require- 
ment; some programs and some departments have more stringent standards. Grade 
point averages are computed as shown in the undergraduate section of this catalog, on 
page 97. 

Probationary Status. A graduate student is considered to be on probationary 
status whenever the cumulative GPA, or the GPA for one semester, falls below 2.33. 
Some departments may have more stringent standards. In most cases, the student's 
department will send the student a letter of warning. However, the probationary status 
applies whether or not such a letter has been issued. A second semester of probationary 
status will lead to automatic dismissal by the Graduate Office unless a plea for 
exception is presented by the student's department and approved by the Dean of 
Graduate Studies. A student may be dismissed after only one semester of performance 
at the probationary level by specific departmental action, if such action is preceded by 
a warning of unsatisfactory performance. (For other causes, see below.) 

Dismissal. A graduate student may be dismissed from a program either for 
reasons of unsatisfactory progress or for reasons of behavior judged by the University 
to be disruptive or otherwise contrary to the best interest of either the University or the 
student. 

Appeal. Graduate students may petition Graduate Council concerning the appli- 
cation of any academic regulation. Petitions should be addressed to the Chair of the 
Council, but should be made only when a dispute cannot be resolved at the departmen- 
tal level. 

Calendar Deadlines. Graduate students are expected to observe all deadlines 
listed in the academic calendar. 

Continuous Enrollment, Readmission. Graduate students are expected to 
maintain continuous involvement and enrollment, unless official leave of absence has 
been granted. Failure to register for any period without a leave of absence granted by 
the Graduate Office constitutes a de facto withdrawal. If the student later wishes to 
resume study, reapplication is required. Readmission is given only on the recommen- 
dation of the department and the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies. A 
readmission fee of $100 is charged. 

Departmental Service. In most research degree programs, graduate students are 
assigned a limited amount of teaching or other departmental service as part of their 
training. The assignment should not entail more than ten hours per week, averaged 
over the semester, and will not be required for more than eight semesters. 

Approval of Candidacy. A student seeking a master's or doctoral degree must 
submit a petition for candidacy through the departmental chair to the Dean of 
Graduate Studies. The chair must specify the student's thesis director, recommend a 
thesis committee, certify that the applicant has fulfilled the departmental requirements 
and provide a transcript or other evidence that the work within the department is of 
high quality. The final oral examination in defense of thesis can be given only after the 
candidacy has been approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies. Applications for 



.- . _. >o - , ,-■ , ■ ' . 145 

approval of candidacy for the doctoral degree must be filed in the Office of Graduate 
Programs prior to November 1 and for the master's degree prior to February 1 of the 
academic year in which graduation is expected. The candidacy is valid for two years 
for the master's degree and four years for the doctoral degree. A student whose 
candidacy has expired must receive specific approval from the department and from 
the Dean of Graduate Studies in order to remain in the Graduate Program. Such 
approval will be given only in exceptional circumstances. A student must have been 
approved for candidacy for the doctoral degree before the beginning of the ninth 
semester of residency at Rice to be eligible for continued financial support. 

Oral Examinations, Thesis Committees. A committee for the oral examination, 
known as the thesis committee, is approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies at the time 
candidacy is approved. A thesis committee is composed of at least three members, of 
which two, including the committee chair, must be members of the student's depart- 
ment. In the case of a doctoral committee one member must be from another 
department within the University. At least three members, including the chair, must 
be tenured or tenure-track members of the Rice faculty or must be members previously 
certified by the Provost. The committee chair need not be the thesis director, but must 
be tenured or a tenure-track member of the major department. 

Candidates are responsible for informing the members of their committee of the 
nature of the research and its progress; the members of the committee should review 
and approve the thesis in preliminary form before March 15 in order for the candidate 
to be eligible to receive the degree in the May commencement. After candidacy has 
been approved, the oral examination in defense of thesis may be scheduled at any time 
in either semester, except during official examination periods. The deadline for 
scheduling an oral examination of a thesis to be submitted for a degree to be conferred 
at the May Commencement is the last day of classes of the Sprmg semester. For the 
doctoral degree, the examination must be announced in the Rice News at least one 
week in advance of the oral examination. Students should note that material to be 
published in the Rice News should be submitted at least two weeks in advance of the 
expected publication date. In appropriate circumstances, an oral examination for the 
Ph.D. may be scheduled during the summer, and in this case the posting of notice of 
the time and place on the bulletin board of Fondren Library the preceding week is 
acceptable as the public announcement. For the master's degree, public notice of the 
oral examination should be posted on the departmental bulletin board one week in 
advance. 

The length of the examination and the character of the subject matter on which the 
candidate will be examined are left to the judgment of the committee. Should the 
candidate fail, the chair may schedule a second examination. In the event of a second 
failure, the student is required to withdraw from the University. Following the 
successful passing of the oral examination in defense of the thesis, two signed copies 
of the thesis must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Programs no later than one 
year from the date of the examination. 

Students who pass the oral examination in defense of thesis on or before the first 
day of classes of any semester do not have to register for that or any subsequent 
semester even though minor revisions to the final copy may be continuing. In order to 
be placed on the degree list, students should send a copy of the approval of candidacy 
form, signed by the thesis committee to signify successful defense of the thesis, to the 
Office of Graduate Studies immediately following the oral examination. 



146 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Thesis Regulations and Procedures. The thesis, which is the principal record of 
work for an advanced degree, will be permanently preserved in the library. Directions 
for standard thesis form, which must be followed in detail, are provided by the Office 
of Graduate Programs at the time of approval of candidacy. Students submitting a 
dissertation fortheDoctorofPhilosophy, Doctor of Architecture, or Doctor of Musical 
Arts degree must fill out a Survey of Earned Doctorates form. All students submitting 
theses, whether for master's or doctoral degrees, must complete a University Micro- 
film contract. Fees for the microfilming and binding of the thesis are to be paid to the 
cashier prior to submission of the two copies to the Graduate Office for approval. The 
deadline for submission of the thesis to the Office of Graduate Programs is noon of the 
next-to-the-last Friday preceding commencement. 



Tuition, Fees, and Expenses 



Tuition and fees for graduate students given here are for academic year 1992-93 
only and are subject to change in subsequent years as the operating expenses of the 
University change. 

Tuition for full-time students enrolled in the graduate division is $9,300 per year 
($4,650 per semester) for all students through four or six semesters, as indicated 
below. In addition, each full-time graduate student working "on campus" pays a health 
service fee of $ 1 70.00 per year ($85 .00 per semester), a Graduate Student Association 
fee of $ 1 ($5 per semester) and an Honor Council fee of $ 1 . After six semesters of full- 
time study, students continuing any phase of their studies, including work on their 
dissertation, on or off campus, must be registered and are subject to tuition of $490 per 
year ($245 per semester). Students who are admitted with a relevant master's degree 
enter the reduced-tuition category after four semesters of full-time study. 

Refer to page 111 for a discussion of health insurance charges. 

Continuous involvement and enrollment are expected. Failure to register for any 
period without a leave of absence granted by the Office of Graduate Studies constitutes 
withdrawal. A reinstatement fee of $25 is required upon return after an official leave 
of absence. A readmission fee of $100 is required upon return after previous with- 
drawal or failure to maintain active registration. 

The fee for the preceptorship programs in architecture, music, engineering, etc., 
which involve approved supervised work off campus to be recorded on the student 
transcript, is $ 1 00 per semester. Tuition for part time and Class III students is $490.00 
per semester hour plus $50 registration fee each semester; total not to exceed $4,650 
for Class III students. Students taking nine hours or more must be considered full-time. 
No scholarship or fellowship support is available to part-time students. 

Graduate students and their spouses may purchase an athletic events ticket from 
the Cashier's Office for $50.00. The sticker admits the student or spouse to all 
regularly scheduled athletic events. 



- ■ 147 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Prizes 



Memorial Fellowships, Honors, and Prizes. Provision is made for a variety of 
fellowships, scholarships, and prizes available to graduates of this and other univer- 
sities. Memorial fellowships that have been founded and endowed by gift or bequest 
on the part of friends of Rice University provide stipends enabling the holders to devote 
their time to study and research in their chosen fields. There are also several industrial 
fellowships maintained by companies interested in the development of technical fields 
and the training of competent scientists, engineers, and business executives. 

Persons desiring consideration for appointment as fellows should consult with the 
department in which they desire to do research. However, not all fellowships are 
available every year. 

A partial list of graduate scholarships, fellowships, and awards includes: 
Achievement Rewards for College Scientists (ARCS Foundation) Scholarships in 

Science and Engineering 
Ora N. Arnold Fellowship for better understanding between people and governments 

of the United States and those of Mexico, the South American states, the West 

Indies, and the Philippine Islands 
Nettie S. Autrey Memorial Fellowship in Science 
Eleanor and Mills Bennett Fellowships in Hydrology 
Ralph Budd Award for Research in Engineering 
Samuel Fain Carter Fellowship in Economics 
Edward F. Chavanne Fellowship in Religious Studies 
Robert L. Chuoke Award in Physics 
Cities Service Research Fellowship in Geology 
Continental Oil Company Fellowship in Geology 
John W. Cox Research Fund for Scholarships and Fellowships in Bioengineering and 

Biosciences 
William Dunlap Darden Medal in Architecture 

Environmental Protection Agency Fellowships in Environmental Science and Engi- 
neering 
W. Maurice Ewing Fellowship in Marine Science 

Exxon Fellowship in Geology • - 

John W. Gardner Award in Humanities and Social Sciences 
Leroy Caleb Gibbon Award in Geology and Geophysics 
Louis J. Girard Foundation Fellowship for Opthalmic Research 
William and Elva Gordon Scholarship in Space Physics and Astronomy 
Patricia Roberts Harris Fellowships . - 

Gulf Oil Company Fellowship in Geology -- ■■•" 

Karl F. Hasselmann Fellowship in Chemical Engineering 
Marjory Meyer Hasselmann Fellowship in Chemistry 

Fannie and John Hertz Foundation Fellowship in Applied Physical Sciences 
Houston Gem and Mineral Society Fellowship in Geology 
Houston Geological Society Outstanding Student Award 
Houston Oil and Minerals Corporation Fellowship in Geology 
Jameson Fellowship for American Decorative Arts 
W. M. Keck Foundation Fellowship in Geology and Geophysics 
Ruth Lee Kennedy Fellowship for Studies in the Golden Age of Spanish Literature 
Captain Charles Septimus Longcope Awards in History 



148 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Edgar Odell Lovett Fellowships in Mathematics 

Jermayne MacAgy Fellowships in Art History 

Mrs. L. F. McCollum Fellowship 

John P. McGovem Outstanding Pre-Medical Student Award 

John W. Mecom Fellowship in Geology 

Dr. and Mrs. Earl Douglas Mitchell Fellowship in German 

Dr. and Mrs. Earl Douglas Mitchell Fellowship in Linguistics 

William F. Marlar Scholarship in Space Science 

National Institute of Health Fellowships 

National Institute of Health Traineeships in Biology 

National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowships 

Pennzoil Company Fellowship in Geology 

Petroleum Research Fund Fellowships of the American Chemical Society 

Phillips Petroleum Company Fellowship in Chemistry 

Mrs. L. A. Richardson Trust 

Zevi W. Salsburg Awards in Chemistry 

Schlumberger Foundation Fellowship in Mathematics 

Shell Fellowship in Physics 

Robert Parker Shubinski Award in Civil Engineering 

Sigma Xi Research Awards 

John Stauffer Scholarship in Chemistry 

Tenneco Oil Company Fellowship in Geology 

Texaco Fellowship in Physics 

Radoslav A. Tsanoff Fellowship in Philosophy 

Richard B. Turner Memorial Awards in Chemistry 

Union Oil of California Fellowship in Geology 

Lodieska Stockbridge Vaughan Fellowship 

Harry Weiser Awards in Chemistry 

Wiess Fellowship in Geology 

Robert A. Welch Foundation Predoctoral Fellowships 

H. A. Wilson Award in Physics 

Wray-Todd Fellowships in Natural Sciences 



Scholarships and Prizes of the Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Adminis- 
tration 

Leo M. Acker Memorial Scholarship in Accounting 

Andersen Consulting Scholarship 

J. Kenneth S. Arthur Scholarship 

Alice Pratt Brown Scholarship 

Dean's Award for Academic Excellence 

COMIT Scholarship in Management Information Systems 

John J. Deering Loan Fund 

Educational Foundation of Texas Society of Certified Public Accountants 

Excellence Award 
David E. Famsworth Scholarship 

Financial Executives Institute Award in Administrative Science 
E.F. "Gene" Florian Scholarship in Administrative Science 
Bernard Fuchs Scholarship 
H.H. Galloway Award in Administrative Science 



- ' '■ 149 

Houston Society of Financial Analysts Scholarship Award 

Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration Award for Excellence in Taxation 
Jones Graduate School Alumni Association Scholarship 
Jones Scholars 

William H. and Marion F. Keenan Fellowships 

Cooper M. and Zava Waldrop Lochridge Scholarship in Administrative Science 
Speros P. Martel Scholarship 
John T. McCants Scholarship in Accounting 
Vernon F. "Doc" Neuhaus. Sr., Scholarship 
Lorane T. Phillips Award for Excellence in Writing 
Robert E. Phillips Award for Excellence in Oral Presentation 
Rotan Mosle Loan Fund 
Verne F. Simons Scholarship in Accounting 
Wall Street Journal Achievement Award 
M. A. "Mike" Wright Award 

Scholarships and Prizes of the Shepherd School of Music. See listing in the 
undergraduate section, page 121-122. 

Rice Graduate Fellowships. Graduate students with high academic records and 
outstanding qualifications may receive support through awards of Rice University 
Fellowships. These fellowships in most cases provide a stipend plus tuition for the 
nine-month academic period. Special fellowships may be available to provide support 
during the summer months. Particularly outstanding entering students may be nomi- 
nated by their department for a Rice Presidential Fellowship. 

Research Assistantships. usually funded from grants and contracts, are available 
in many departments (especially those in the divisions of Natural Sciences and 
Engineering). These awards are given to qualified students (usually second-year or 
later) to provide assistance on faculty research projects. However, such work normally 
contributes to the student's thesis. In some departments, a limited number of Teaching 
Assistantships may be available to advanced students. Appointees to any fellowship 
or assistantship must be engaged in full-time graduate study. 

Eligibility for support from Rice University funds is limited to five years of study 
for students seeking a doctorate or three years for students seeking a master's degree. 
However, in order to maintain eligibility in the fifth year, the student must have 
achieved candidacy. Doctoral students entering with a previously earned relevant 
master's degree will be eligible for stipend support for a maximum of four years of 
study and must have achieved candidacy by the beginning of the fourth year. 

Graduate Tuition Scholarships. Students whose previous records show marked 
promise but for whom no graduate fellowships are available may, especially in their 
first year of graduate study, be awarded full or partial graduate tuition scholarships 
without stipend. Graduate scholars must be engaged in full-time study. 

Scholarships which provide both tuition and stipends are also available for a 
limited number of graduate students who are participants in the Army or Navy ROTC 
programs. For information on these scholarships, contact the Departments of Military 
or Naval Science. 



150 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Financial Aid 



A limited number of tuition grants based on financial need are available. Rice 
engineering students who have received financial aid from the University during their 
undergraduate years may apply for continuation of assistance as needed for the year of 
study for the professional master's degree. 

The Office of Financial Aid at Rice University offers limited aid to graduate 
students in the form of loans and work to U.S. citizens, permanent residents, and 
refugees. 

Stafford Loans (formerly Guaranteed Student Loans) may be processed 
through Rice up to a maximum eligibility of $7,500 per annum. These are set by Rice 
University and the guarantor. 

No interest accrues nor is payment required while a student is enrolled at least 
half-time at Rice or full-time in any eligible post-secondary institution or for six 
months after terminating attendance. Repayment begins after this period, including a 
7 to 9 percent annual interest charge on the unpaid principal balance. Depending on 
the size of the total loan commitment, the repayment period may extend over as much 
as 10 years. A completed Stafford application, with supplements and 1040s must be 
submitted to the Rice Financial Aid Office. 

CAVEAT: If the student has prior undergraduate Stafford Loans, it would be in 
his best interest to obtain additional loans from the same source. Deferment forms 
should be filed with the holders of undergraduate loans. This applies to those who are 
Rice graduates as well as students from other schools. 

Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS) are available to graduate students. They 
may borrow up to $4,000 per annum to an aggregate of $20,000. The interest rate on 
SLS loans is a maximum of 12 percent per year on the unpaid balance of the loans. 
Ordinarily, the first payment is due within 60 days of the date of disbursement. 
However, graduate students may defer payment of principal and interest until termi- 
nation of enrollment. 

A completed SLS application, with supplements, must be submitted to the Rice 
Financial Aid Office. 

All students may work on campus but time is a major factor. For most, 10 to 12 
hours a week is a reasonable limit. College Work/Study is available to students who 
meet eligibility criteria set by the Federal Government. A Financial Aid Form (FAF) 
must be filed with College Scholarship Service (CSS), and earnings will be limited to 
the amount shown on the award letter. 

Fellowship and scholarship recipients are selected by the individual departments, 
subject to the approval of the Office of Graduate Programs. Applications for such 
awards should be made directly to the department involved. 

A Gulf Oil Corporation Foundation Loan Fund and the Benjamin S. Lindsey and 
Veola Noble Lindsey Memorial Loan Fund are also available to students who are 
working toward a degree to assist them in meeting educational expenses. The funds of 
this loan program are limited. Interested persons may contact the Financial Aid Office. 
Interested students wishing to apply for a loan under any of these loan programs should 
commence application procedures the summer prior to the academic year for which 
they are seeking assistance. Detailed information and application forms are available 
in the Financial Aid Office. 



151 

An Emergency Loan Fund, originally provided through gifts from the Graduate 
Wives Club of 1972-73, the Graduate Student Association, and various faculty 
members, is available to help graduate students at Rice with short-term needs. Loans 
from this fund are limited to $150 and must be repaid within three months. In lieu of 
interest, a charge of $1 per $50 loaned is assessed to maintain the fund. 



Graduate Student Life 

Graduate Student Responsibility 

Rice University encourages student self-discipline within the framework of its 
general objectives. Each member of the community is expected to govern his or her 
conduct by standards of good taste and ethical judgment and to exercise personal 
responsibility. 

The University reserves the right to require the withdrawal of any students whose 
failure to accept responsibilities as evidenced by conduct or their scholastic achieve- 
ments is considered detrimental to their own or the University's best interests. 



The Honor System 

Graduate students are expected to observe the provisions of the honor code. The 
provisions of the honor system are summarized on page 125. 



Fondren Library 

Seepages 129-130. "V 

Graduate Student Goernment and Organizations 

All students in the graduate program are members of the Graduate Student 
Association, which is the sole organ representing the graduate students as a body. Part- 
time graduate students may become participating members of the association upon 
payment of the necessary fee. The governing body of this organization is the Graduate 
Student Association Council, consisting of a representative from each department 
offering graduate study, along with a president, vice president, secretary, and treasurer 
elected by the Council. Graduate students also participate in University affairs through 
their representatives on many of the standing and ad hoc University committees, such 
as the Graduate Council, the Research Council, and various departmental committees. 

The Graduate Student Association, in its efforts to encourage social interaction 
among graduate students from different departments, is responsible for operation of 
the graduate student lounge, and invites participation by all members of the graduate 
student body in a variety of social activities. 

Graduate student organizations falling under the umbrella of the Graduate 
Student Association include the Jones Graduate School Student Association, and their 
affiliate organizations, and the graduate division of the Chinese Student Association. 



152 INFORMATION FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Housing 

The Rice Graduate House is located at the south edge of the campus at the comer 
of South Main and University. The facility offers rooms, either private or shared, 
community kitchens, a commons and meeting rooms, and free transportation to 
academic buildings. Graduate students may also apply for membership in the under- 
graduate residential colleges. Rooms and apartments are often available for rent within 
walking or bicycling distance of the campus. The Office of Student Advising Activities 
and the Student Association keep a record of rooms and apartments about which they 
have been notified, and the daily newspapers list still others. Incoming graduate 
students are advised to arrive in Houston several days early in order to find housing. 
Rooms in the Graduate House must be reserved on a space-available basis by July 15 
for the fall semester. 



The Student Health Service and Insurance 

Graduate students pay the same health service fee as undergraduates. A primary 
care outpatient clinic, open weekdays through the undergraduate school year, is 
located on campus in Hanszen College. After clinic hours, medical care is available at 
Park Plaza Hospital emergency room and through the doctors at Park Plaza Hospital. 
Access to limited psychiatric consultation, including marriage counseling, is also 
available to graduate students through the Rice Counseling Center. For more informa- 
tion, refer to page 128-129. 

All Rice students are required to have health insurance. Insurance may be 
purchased through the University at two levels of coverage, described in a brochure 
that is available in the Cashier's Office and the Office of Student Activities. Rice's 
group coverage will be effective from 12:01 a.m., August 15, 1992, until 12:01 a.m. 
August 15, 1993. Dependent coverage is also available. If a student has other medical 
insurance, a waiver card showing proof of insurance must be signed and returned to 
the Cashier's Office by August 1 5, prior to the beginning of classes, to avoid automatic 
billing for coverage. ' ,_ ■-■ •■ 



Student Automobiles 

All automobiles on campus must be registered with the Rice University Police 
Department. For more information, refer to page 132. 



>i.i.a 



153 



Courses of 
Instruction 



>!'.. -.»*• 






Academic departments are listed in this section alphabetically (except for the 
engineering departments, which are grouped together), with complete lists and 
descriptions of courses. Most departments also give specific requirements for students 
both at the undergraduate and graduate levels. These statements are supplemental to 
the University degree requirements described on pages 69-90. 

Courses numbered below 300 are lower level or introductory courses. Those 
numbered 300 to 499 are designated as advanced courses. Advanced courses are open 
to first-year and second-year students with proper prerequisites and to graduate 
students on approval of the student's adviser. Courses designed for graduate students 
are numbered 500 and above. The methods of presentation and quality of work 
expected make them generally unsuited to undergraduate participation. Undergradu- 
ates are permitted to enroll in graduate-level courses only after consultation with their 
advisers and with the instructor of the course. 

F and/or S following the course number indicates the semester the course is 
normally given. 

Figures in parentheses following the title of each course signify the number of 
class hours per week, the number of laboratory hours per week, and the credit in 
semester hours for the completed course, in that order. 

Certain courses are dependent upon available faculty, student demand, or fund- 
ing. Uncertainty about when or whether a particular course will be offered during 
1992-93 is indicated by the designation "Not offered every year." 

Course descriptions in this section illustrate topics within the subject matter of the 
courses. Topics actually covered in the courses may vary from the examples given. 
Courses are subject to cancellation or modification, but cancellation of a course after 
final enrollment occurs only in extreme circumstances. 

Students may obtain more detailed information about courses from the Registrar's 
Schedule of Courses Offered published each year or from the instructor of the course. 

Persons using this catalog to evaluate Rice University transcripts should refer to 
course titles and descriptions, rather than course numbers, to determine content 
because course numbers are occasionally changed. ' 



154 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION t A i V. SI! DtN n> 

Accounting and Administrative Science 

The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration 



Professor Bailar, Dean 
Professors Barnea, Bixby, Bryant, Dipboye, Driskill, R.N. Taylor, 
Uecker, von der Mehden, Westbrook, E.E. Williams, Windsor, and Zeff 
Visiting Professor Wilkinson 
Adjunct Professors Attwell, Banks, Griffin, McCormack, and McDonald 
Associate Professors Batsell, Dharan, Napier, and W.M. Taylor , 
Adjunct Associate Professors Cramer, Flatt, Gessler, Hannan, Hewitt, 
Sutton, Wedemeyer, and D.L. Williams 
Assistant Professors Abraham, Bridges, Ikenberry, H.H. Johnston, CM. 
Miller, Rankine, Schuler, Shockley, Silverstein, Stice, and Yim 
3r Adjunct Assistant Professors J.W. Carroll and Duke 

bi Lecturers Abbatangelo, Atherton, L. Baker, Ciliske, Crump, Friday, 
2j Gottlieb, Gow, Hauser, Kehoe, L.S. Long, Mandel, Mardis, Meakin, 
o3 Murphree, D. Ross, Shaddix, Viebig, Westheimer, and Whitmire 

nz Degrees Offered: Master of Business Administration; Master of Accounting 

--t The Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Administration was established in 1974 
through a gift from Houston Endowment Inc. The school is dedicated to providing 
unique educational opportunities for professional training in the fields of accounting, 
business administration, or public and nonprofit management for highly select 
graduate students. The curricula leading to the degrees of Master of Business 
Administration (which includes a concentration in public and nonprofit management) 
and Master of Accounting are designed to be distinctive in terms of scope, realism, and 
utility. 

The Jones Graduate School and the George R. Brown School of Engineering 
offer a joint M.B.A./Master of Engineering degree. The non-thesis engineering 
degree may be obtained in the departments of chemical engineering, civil engineering, 
computer science, electrical and computer engineering, environmental science and 
engineering, mathematical sciences, mechanical engineering and materials science, 
and statistics (see pages 143 and 146). 

Undergraduate Program. No undergraduate major is offered in the Jones 
Graduate School; however, such undergraduate courses as accounting may be used to 
fulfill major requirements in the interdisciplinary program in managerial studies. This 
degree program is described on page 398. 

Students admitted to the Honors Program in Managerial Studies may elect certain 
specified graduate courses in accounting and administrative science as part of their 
major requirements. 

Graduate Programs. The Jones Graduate School of Administration offers the 
Master of Business Administration and Master of Accounting degrees. Applicants to 
these programs must submit recent scores on the Graduate Management Admission 
Test (GMAT), all official college transcripts, and three letters of recommendation. 
Unless they received an undergraduate degree from a U.S. college or university, 
foreign nationals whose native language is not English must submit recent scores on 



155 

the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Application forms are available 
from and should be submij;ted to the Office of Admissions, Jesse H. Jones Graduate 
School of Administration, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251. 
Graduates from any accredited university and from a broad range of undergraduate 
majors are considered for either professional program. Students enrolled in the Jones 
Graduate School represent a wide variety of undergraduate majors, including econom- 
ics, managerial studies, mathematics, mathematical sciences, political science, his- 
tory, languages, fine arts, natural sciences, engineering, and business administration. 
Admission to the Jones Graduate School is highly selective and limited to those who 
have performed with distinction in their previous academic work and on the GMAT. 

The two-year M.B.A. program requires no specific prerequisite courses for 
admission; however, students may find it beneficial to have a background that 
includes undergraduate course work in principles of accounting, principles of 
microeconomics, and mathematics. Because spreadsheet and word-processing soft- 
ware is used extensively in course work, students should have a thorough understand- 
ing of these types of software packages before enrolling. Undergraduates contemplat- 
ing graduate work in accounting should have taken the prerequisite courses outlined 
on page 157 by the end of their senior year in order to complete the M.Acco. degree 
in one year. 

The Jones Graduate School and the George R. Brown School of Engineering 
offer a joint M.B.A./Master of Engineering degree. The non-thesis engineering 
degree may be obtained in departments of chemical engineering, civil engineering, 
computer science, electrical and computer engineering, environmental science and 
engineering, mathematical sciences, mechanical engineering and materials science, 
and statistics. Ordinarily, the engineering degree takes one academic year to 
complete, whereas the M.B.A. requires two. Joint-degree candidates, however, can 
fulfill requirements for both degrees in two academic years and a summer. To enter 
the joint-degree master's program, applicants must be accepted by both the Jones 
Graduate School and the engineering department in which they wish to enroll. The 
program requires a special application which may be obtained from the Jones 
Graduate School. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE), rather than the Graduate 
Management Aptitude Test (GMAT), is required for the joint-degree program, and 
some engineering departments require advanced tests as well. Students whose native 
language is not English must supply scores from the Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL). 

Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) The M.B.A. program seeks to 
prepare students for high-level management positions in business, government, and 
nonprofit organizations. 

Completion of the M.B.A. degree requires a minimum of two academic years in 
residence at Rice and 64 credit hours. The M.B.A. student must register for no fewer 
than 15 and no more than 18 credit hours. Any other registration requires special 
permission. All registration and drop/add forms require the signature of the associate 
dean for student affairs or his designee. All courses must be approved by the Jones 
Graduate School. Requirements are stated annually for each entering class. 

Waivers, exemptions, and transfers of credit are solely the decision of the school. 
Required courses may be waived in exceptional cases where the student already has 
the equivalent preparation. The residence requirement is not necessarily reduced, but 
additional elective courses are made available. 



1 56 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Students must follow the curriculum o)F study as prescribed by the Jones Graduate 
School. Exceptions are granted only upon written petition to the school's Curriculum 
and Standards Committee, which advises the dean; the dean's decision must be 
appealed to the Graduate Council. 

The first year of the full-time program is completely required and consists of 
foundation courses in accounting, communications, economics, finance, legal and 
governmental processes, management information systems, marketing, organiza- 
tional behavior, and quantitative methods. The student must complete at least 33 
approved credit hours in the first year, including Administration 501 and 502. The 
exact courses will be specified by the Jones Graduate School at registration. No 
exceptions are permitted except at the sole discretion of the school. Courses in the first 
year serve as prerequisites for the second year required and elective courses. Prereq- 
uisite requirements are enforced. 

The second year features two case method courses on management strategy 
designed to integrate the foundation skills taught in the first year. The student must 
complete at least 3 1 approved credit hours in the second year, including Administra- 
tion 503, 504, 591, and 592, together with 24 credit hours of approved electives. 

Each student is required to complete at least one area of concentration consisting 
of no fewer than 1 2 hours of elective courses. No credit hour may be counted toward 
more than one concentration; no more than two concentrations may be declared. With 
the assistance of an adviser, each student selects courses to meet the student's goals 
and objectives. Most courses will be in administrative science or accounting, but they 
may also include graduate or upper level offerings in other departments. Concentra- 
tions are available in accounting, business entrepreneurship, finance, international 
management, management information systems, marketing, operations research, and 
public and nonprofit management. Students concentrating in operations research may 
supplement the school's offerings with courses from the departments of mathematical 
sciences, economics, and statistics. Any other concentration requires a petition to the 
associate dean for admissions and student affairs. Specific concentration require- 
ments are issued annually. 

The international management concentration offers a set of elective courses in 
the political, economic, and legal aspects of multinational activities. Students must 
take courses specified in the adviser's concentration statement. They may take related 
courses in other departments. The international management program is particularly 
relevant for students with a strong background in foreign languages and cultures. 
Students lacking such a background are strongly advised to take additional time 
(including summers and possibly a third year) to acquire such skills. Language 
training does not qualify for graduate credit toward the M.B.A. degree. 

The Jones Graduate School offers an area of concentration in public and 
nonpront management. Students who wish to prepare for government or nonprofit 
service select, with the assistance of an adviser, a set of elective courses tailored to meet 
the student's career aims. Students may take related courses in other departments. The 
M.B.A. core curriculum is specifically designed to promote the transfer of manage- 
ment skills from the private to the public and nonprofit sectors. Students interested in 
business entrepreneurship take at least two of Administration 52 1 , 522, or 525 and 
will take other related courses. 

Joint Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.)/Master of Engineering. 
The Joint M.B.A./Master of Engineering prepares students to become managers in 
organizations requiring both a high level of technical expertise and managerial skills. 



157 

Completion of the joint M.B.A./Master of Engineering requires a minimum of 
two academic years and a summer in residence at Rice and the completion of 76 credit 
hours: 24 in an engineering discipline and 52 in business administration. During the 
summer before the first academic year, students take six hours of basic accounting 
courses. For the remainder of the two academic years, they divide their time between 
the two schools, taking roughly six hours of engineering and 12 hours of business 
administration courses. The exact course schedule is determined in consultation with 
the engineering department in which the student is enrolled and the associate dean for 
student affairs at the Jones Graduate School. 

Master of Accounting (M.Acco.). The Master of Accounting program prepares 
students for careers in accounting and information systems. No specific undergraduate 
major is required. Applicants who have taken the following prerequisites can 
complete the M.Acco. program in one year of graduate study: 6 hours of economics. 
6 hours of psychology (which must include 3 hours of industrial and organizational 
psychology), 3 hours of applied statistics. 3 hours of operations research. 3 hours of 
financial accounting, and 3 hours of managerial accounting. In addition, courses in 
corporate finance and intermediate microeconomics are recommended, but not 
required. Students who have not satisfied these prerequisites take the first year of the 
M.B.A. curriculum and then take advanced accounting courses in the second year. 
Alternatively, they may choose to take the M.B.A. degree program with an accounting 
concentration. Work experience is not required to apply for the M. Acco. degree 
program. 

The Master of Accounting degree program requires a minimum of 33 semester 
hours, including the following courses: Accounting 503 or Administration 541; 
Accounting 511,512,514, 524, 53 1 , and 541 ; and Administration 503, 504, 509, 543, 
and 560. 

All courses must be approved by the Jones Graduate School. Required courses 
may be waived in exceptional cases where the student already has the equivalent 
preparation. Waivers, exemptions, or transfers of credit are solely the decision of the 
school. The residence requirement is not necessarily reduced, but additional elective 
courses are made available. Requirements are stated annually for each entering class. 

Completion of the M.Acco. degree program qualifies the student to take the 
Uniform CPA Examination. To sit for the examination, the State of Texas requires a 
baccalaureate or graduate degree conferred by an institution of higher education 
recognized by the Texas State Board of Public Accountancy; successful completion 
of at least 30 semester hours of accounting courses with at least 20 of those semester 
hours in accounting core subjects as defined by board rule; and successful completion 
of at least 20 semester hours of related business courses as defined by board rule. 
Students who complete the M.Acco. degree program, pass the CPA examination, and 
accumulate one year of accounting work experience will satisfy the requirements to 
be licensed as a CPA in Texas. • ..,..■>- 

Academic and Professional Standards 



A student must meet both academic and professional standards to continue 
academic work and to graduate. In accepting admission to the M.Acco. or M.B.A. 
degree program, all students agree to be governed by the standards and procedures for 
dismissal or disciplinary action stated below. 



158 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Academic Standards 

A minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 (B) is required for 
graduation. All courses taken for the M.B.A. or Master of Accounting degree 
(including approved courses taken outside the Jones Graduate School) will be counted 
in the cumulative GPA calculation. A student with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 (B) or 
higher is eligible to receive financial aid from Jones Graduate School sources, i 

Academic standards for degree candidates. Any student who has completed 64 
approved hours for the M.B.A. or two-year M.Acco. degree, 76 for the joint M.B.A./ 
Master of Engineering degree, or 33 for the one-year M.Acco. degree, but who has a 
cumulative average lower than 3.0, will not be permitted to graduate and will be 
dismissed (see "Dismissal for low GPA," below). Such a student may, at the school's 
discretion, be permitted to take additional approved course work during the subse- 
quent 12 months in an effort to raise the cumulative average to 3.0 (B). 
Grades below C. Only grades of C and higher can be counted for credit towards 
graduation. If a student receives a grade lower than C in a course required for 
graduation, the course must be repeated. If a student receives a grade lower than C in 
an elective course, the specific course need not be repeated, but the credits must be 
made up. 

Failing a course. A student who fails any course will be placed on academic probation 
regardless of cumulative GPA. A student who fails a course may retake the failed 
course only once and only if his or her cumulative GPA is 3.0 or higher. A student who 
fails a course twice will be dismissed. (No advanced course for which the failed course 
is a prerequisite may be taken until the prerequisite course is satisfactorily completed.) 
Dismissal for low GPA. Students with a cumulative GPA lower than 3.0 at the end 
of any semester will be dismissed. Notification of a cumulative GPA lower than 3.0 
means that the student has been dismissed and may not register for more courses. 
Dismissal may be appealed under certain conditions, discussed in the following 
section. 

Appeal of dismissal. Full-time students in the first semester and flex-time students 
in the first two semesters of their studies who have been dismissed may appeal to the 
dean for a one-year suspension or for a continuation on academic probation, if and only 
if they fulfill both the following conditions: 

(1) The student earned a cumulative GPA of at least 2.9 in the first semester of 
study (all students) and at least 2.95 in the second semester of study (flex- 
time students); 

(2) The student has earned no more than three grades of B- or less in his or her 
j^, studies. 

r Full-time students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 at the end of their 

second semester; flex-time students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 at the 

end of their third semester. 

Academic probation conditions. A student placed on academic probation cannot 

graduate, may not drop courses, and must complete all courses with a grade of C or 

better. 



. - 159 

Professional Standards , r 

M.Acco. and M.B.A. students are enrolled in professional degree programs 
preparing them for responsible management position in business, government, and 
nonprofit organizations. An important aspect of their academic preparation is neces- 
sarily their fitness for such responsibilities. They will therefore be held to high 
standards of professional conduct, as would be expected of managers, and substan- 
tially exceeding those standards expected of them simply as students. 
Dismissal for failure to meet professional standards. A student may be dismissed 
or suspended for failure to meet professional standards, as defined in the University 
Code of Conduct. 

Probation for failure to meet professional standards. The dean is authorized to 
place a student on disciplinary probation for unacceptable conduct. Such probation 
will include oral and written notice that future misconduct will include filing of 
specific charges. Such probationary notice is not required as a precondition for filing 
specific charges. , 

Suspension Conditions 

Suspension for failure to meet either academic or professional standards always 
requires that the student apply for readmission to the school. 

Eligibility for Financial Aid 

Financial assistance by the Jones Graduate School is awarded only for a given 
semester or year. Continuation of assistance depends upon satisfactory academic 
performance, professional behavior, and availability of funds. Academic or disciplin- 
ary probation, suspension, or the receipt of more than three grades below B- will result 
in the removal of all forms of school financial assistance (scholarship, loan, employ- 
ment). 

Resolution of Disagreements 

In the event of a significant disagreement (not involving grades) between a 
student and an instructor, the following grievance process will be used. First, the 
student is expected to try to resolve the disagreement with the instructor. Second, either 
party may then bring the matter to the associate dean for student affairs, who will 
attempt mediation. Third, either party may then appeal to the dean through the 
Curriculum and Standards Committee. The grievance process is conducted subject to 
a formal written policy approved by the school faculty. This process should be reserved 
for serious complaints of individual mistreatment; frivolous complaints will be 
dismissed. By university policy, a final grade for a course submitted to the registrar 
may be changed only if a clerical error has been made in calculating that grade; grading 
is a matter of faculty judgment. A copy of the formal written grievance policy is 
available from the associate dean for student affairs. 



1 60 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Accounting 

The list of courses and credit hours below is subject to change. 

Accounting Courses \ 

305,F/S INTRODUCTION TO ACCOUNTING (3 3) 

Survey of basic accounting theory and practice with emphasis on the primary problems of asset 
valuation and income determination. In addition to preregistration, students must sign a 
reservation list in 250 Herring Hall. First-year students (freshmen) are not eligible for 
enrollment. 

406,S MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTING (3 3) 

Uses of accounting data to plan and evaluate long-run investment and financing decisions and 
short-run price, costing, output, and financing decisions of the business firm or public entity. In 
addition to preregistration, students must sign a reservation list in 250 Herring Hall. Priority | 

given to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: Acco 305 and Econ 211. j 

411,F ASSET ACCOUNTING (3-0 3) ■ 
Deals with the major questions of asset valuation and income determination in the context of 

accounting theory and the evolving financial, economic, and political factors which have shaped ' 
the existing standards. The standard-setting process is discussed. In addition to preregistration. 

students must sign a reservation list in 250 Herring Hall. Priority given to juniors and seniors. 1 

Prerequisite: Acco 305. | 

497,F INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 0-3) ' 

Independent study on an approved project under faculty supervision. Enrollment by special 1 

permission. I 

498,S INDEPENDENT STUDY (3-0-3) 
See Acco 497. 

501,F FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING (3 3) 

Introduction to accounting theory and practice with emphasis on the primary problems of asset 
valuation and income determination. Prerequisites: graduate standing and instructor's permis- 
sion. 

502,S MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (2-0 2) 

Introduction to accounting systems designed to facilitate internal decision-making evaluation 
and control by private and public organizations. Particular emphasis is given to behavioral 
impact of alternative internal reporting schemes. Prerequisite: Acco 501. 

503,F ADVANCED MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING (2 2) 

Case-oriented course illustrates the interaction of managerial accounting and strategic analysis. 
It gives students the tools required to design managerial accounting systems that support the 
strategic goals of modem service and manufacturing firms. Prerequisites: graduate standing 
and instructor's permission. 

509,F FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANALYSIS (3 3) 

Examines the use of financial statement mformation in several areas, including corporate 
accounting method choice, compensation contract design, forecasting earnings, firm valuation, 
financial distress prediction, bond ratings, credit granting decisions, corporate restructuring 
(mergers, LBOs, capital structure, "off-balance" sheet financing). The course emphasizes the 
application of statistical methods, finance theory, financial accounting, and relevant empirical 
research to problems and cases. Prerequisites: graduate standing and Acco 501 or equivalent. 



; - . ^, 161 

511,F ASSET ACCOUNTING (3-0-3) 

Deals with the major questions of asset valuation and income determination in the context of 
accounting theory and the evolving financial, economic, and political factors which have shaped 
the existing standards. The standard-setting process is discussed. Prerequisites: graduate 
standing and Acco 501 or equivalent. 

512,S EQUITY ACCOUNTING (3-0-3) 

Deals with the particular problems in the estimation of liabilities and stockholders' equity. The 
focus is both on accounting theory and on the financial, economic, and political factors that have 
shaped the existing standards. Prerequisite: Acco 511 or equivalent. 

514,S SPECIAL TOPICS IN ACCOUNTING (3-0-3) 

Deals with the theoretical and technical problems of consolidations, branch accounting, interim 
reporting, foreign operations, and international accounting standards. Also introduces account- 
ing for government and nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: Acco 511: corequisite: Acco 5 1 2. 

524,S MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE (3-0 3) 

Financial statements and accounting are studied in their relationships to financial analysis, 

investment, and capital structure decisions. Capital budgeting and financial theory from the 

perspective of management are emphasized. Prerequisites: graduate standing and Acco 501 or 

equivalent. 

525,F COMPETITIVE USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY (3-0-3) 
Examines the use of information technology in competitive strategy. Prerequisites: graduate 
standing and instructor's permission. 

526,S EXPERT AND DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS (3 3) 

Examines a variety of problems and approaches associated with designing expert systems and 
decision support systems and integrating them into an organization. Prerequisite: Admn 543 or 
instructor's permission. 

527,F SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND DESIGN (3-0-3) 

Concepts related to systems analysis, design, development, and implementation. Prerequisite: 

Admn 543 or instructor's permission. 

528,S MANAGING THE MIS FUNCTION (3 3) 

Examines key issues related to managing the information system and information technology 
activities in an organization. Prerequisite: Admn 543 or instructor's permission. 

531,F FEDERAL TAXATION OF BUSINESS ENTERPRISES (4 4) 

Theory of United States income taxation and its application to corporations, partnerships, and 
proprietorships; study of decision models involving tax structure and tax planning in business 
situations. Prerequisites: graduate standing and Acco 501 or equivalent. 

532,S FEDERAL TAXATION OF INDIVIDUALS (3 3) 

United States individual income taxation, including consideration of tax planning and tax- 
favored retirement plans. Prerequisite: Acco 531. 

534,S SPECIAL TOPICS IN TAXATION (Variable) 

An examination of the theory and structure of federal estate and gift taxation, from both 
compliance and tax planning standpoints, and interrelated income tax planning, including 
income taxation of estates and trusts. Prerequisite: Acco 53 1 . 

536,S INTERNATIONAL TAXATION (3 3) 

Survey of U.S. tax laws impacting on international business operations, review of tax laws of 
selected foreign countries, and discussion of key tax-related management issues. Prerequisites: 
graduate standing and Acco 501 or equivalent. 



1 62 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

541,F AUDITING AND FINANCIAL REPORTING (3 0-3) 

Auditing standards and procedures, statistical sampling applications, audit programs and 
reports, and professional ethics associated with the public accounting profession. Prerequisite: 
graduate standing; corequisite: Acco 5 1 1 or equivalent. 

551,F FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING PRACTICE (3-0-3) 

Comprehension of FASB pronouncements on valuation, income, and cash flow concepts. 

Prerequisite: graduate standing; corequisite: Acco 5 11 or equivalent. 

597,F INDEPENDENT STUDY (Variable) 

Independent study or directed reading on an approved project under faculty supervision. 

Enrollment by special permission. 

598,S INDEPENDENT STUDY (Variable) 
See Acco 597. 



Administrative Science 

The list of courses and credit hours below is subject to change. 

Administration Courses 

501,F DEAN'S SEMINAR I (0) 

First-year students must register for this course. Seminars are held each semester in which invited 
speakers discuss a variety of management topics. In addition, the Placement Office conducts 
programs in career management. Attendance required. Prerequisites: graduate standing and 
instructor's permission. 

502,S DEAN'S SEMINAR II (0) 

SeeAdmnSOl. 



503,F DEAN'S SEMINAR III (0) 

Second-year M.B. A. and M. Acco. students must register for this course. Seminars are held each 
semester in which invited speakers discuss a variety of management topics. In addition, the 
Placement Office conducts programs in career management. Attendance required. Prerequisites: 
graduate standing and instructor's permission. 

504,S DEAN'S SEMINAR IV ( 1 0- 1 ) 

See Admn 503. Note: Credit for the 501-504 series is awarded only after completion of 504. 

505,F FACULTY RESEARCH SEMINAR (0) 

Faculty and invited guests meet periodically to present current research findings. 

506,S FACULTY RESEARCH SEMINAR (0) 

See Admn 505. 

507,F MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATION (3 3) 

Includes an introduction to corporate communication strategy and international communica- 
tion for first-year students; provides extensive practice in delivering oral presentations and 
composing effective written communication. Prerequisites: graduate standing and instructor's 

permission. 

■micifjfii'. 

509,F COMMUNICATION FOR ACCOUNTANTS (2 2) 

Includes an introduction to corporate communication strategy for students in the one-year 
M.Acco. program; provides extensive practice in delivering oral presentations and composing 
effective written communication. Prerequisites: graduate standing and instructor's permission. 



^; ■ 163 

511,F ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR (3-0 3) 

Examines theoretical and empirical content of psychology applied in the organizational setting, 
the development of organization theory, current approaches to the study of complex organiza- 
tions, and the operation of major types of complex organizations in both private and public 
sectors. Prerequisites: graduate standing and instructor's permission. 

514,F SUMMER INTERNSHIP (0) 

Requires submission of a formal report on the summer-internship company/industry by 
second-year M.B.A. students. Prerequisites: graduate standing and instructor's permission. 

518,S MANAGERIAL DECISION MAKING (3-0 3) 

Review of current theories of decision making in and by organizations. Emphasis on behavioral 

decision theory, human problem solving, and organizational processes. Prerequisite: graduate 

standing. 

521,F THE NEW ENTERPRISE (303 ) 

Laws of success, developing and evaluating business ideas, the economics of new businesses, 
leadership and motivation, legal and tax aspects of new ventures, venture capital, and the 
preparation of a business plan. Prerequisite: Admn 541. 

522,S ENTERPRISE EXCHANGE (3 3) 

How to negotiate, the "needs" approach to buying and selling a business, enterprise valuation, 
deal and contract structuring, mergers and acquisitions, and leveraged buyouts. Limited 
enrollment; instructor's permission. Prerequisite: Admn 521. Not offered in 1993. 

524,S REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT (3 3) 

Identifies and analyzes real estate development opportunities. Prerequisite: Admn 541. 

525,F CREATIVE ENTREPRENEURSHIP (3 3) 

Conceiving ideas for new businesses and evaluating those ideas are the focal points of this course. 
Prerequisite: Admn 541. 

526,S VENTURE CAPITAL (3 3) 

An overview of the venture capital industry, organization and operation of venture capital 
funds, investment methodology, monitoring and portfolio liquidation, leveraged investing, and 
specialized investments. Prerequisite: Acco 524 or instructor's permission. 

531,F QUANTITATIVE METHODS I (3-0-3) 

Use of statistical methods and computer systems to analyze decision problems, including product 
design as an illustration of marketing management. Prerequisites: graduate standing and 
instructor's permission. 

532,S QUANTITATIVE METHODS U (2-0-2) 

Use of operations research methods and computer systems to analyze decision problems, with 
particular emphasis on production and operations management. Prerequisite: Admn 531. 

541,F MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (2 0-2) 

Long-run and short-run price and production decisions in private and public economic entities 
in the face of differing demand conditions and market environments. Prerequisites: graduate 
standing and instructor's permission. . . .. 

542,S MACRO AND INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (2 2) 

Modern political economy, productivity and aggregate economics, the basic Keynesian model, 
neoclassical macroeconomics, and international economics. Prerequisite: Admn 54 1 . 



1 64 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

5434^ INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

(1-0-1) 
Provides an overview of management information systems. Emphasizes effectively managing 
the use of information technology in organizations. Prerequisites: graduate standing and 
instructor's permission. 

544,S CAPITAL MARKETS (3 3) -r^.^ o K.- 

Financial environment of the corporation, use of money and capital market instruments, roles 
of financial intermediaries and institutions. Prerequisite: Admn 545 or instructor's permission. 

545,F INVESTMENTS (3-0-3) 

Investment decisions for individuals and institutions in the context of modem portfolio theory 
and asset pricing relationships. Major topics include portfolio theory, term structure of interest 
rates, asset pricing, stock valuation, fixed income securities, options and futures contracts, and 
market efficiency. Required for finance concentration. Prerequisite: Acco 524. 

546,S CORPORATE FINANCIAL STRATEGY (3-0-3) 

Advanced financial topics of interest to the corporation: value creation, diversification, risk- 
benefit analysis, tax policy, present value. Emphasizes practical problems of the corporation. 

Prerequisite: Admn 547 or instructor's permission. 

^ ^ •:»>:/ irr/'j "i'->i auuTrr[/"ii area 

547,F CORPORATE FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3-0 3) 
Capital structure and dividend theories including signaling, agency costs, and tax effects are 
emphasized. Takeovers, mergers and acquisitions, debt contracting, and financing alternatives 
are studied in the context of corporate finance theory. Required for finance concentration. 
Prerequisite: Acco 524. 

549,F INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3 0-3) 

Examines the financial management of the multinational corporation including the interna- 
tional monetary system and exchange rates, foreign exchange risk management, multinational 
working capital management, foreign investment analysis, capital budgeting, the cost of 
capital, and financing strategy. Prerequisite: Acco 524 or instructor's permission. 

550,S FUTURES AND OPTIONS (3-0-3) 

Examines the principles governing the use of futures and options contracts in portfolio 
management, with particular emphasis on hedging opportunities offered by these contracts and 
on their valuation in competitive markets. Several specific futures markets are examined in detail. 
The more complex option contracts are tested generally, with greater emphasis on principles than 
on particular markets. Prerequisite: Admn 545 or instructor's permission. 

552,S INVESTMENT BANKING (3 3) " "r 

Analysis of the characteristics of the investment banking industry, focusing on topics of 
corporate financial transactions: public offerings, private placements of debt and equity, and 
mergers and acquisitions. Prerequisite: Admn 545 or instructor's permission. 

554,S COMMERCIAL BANKING AND THE ENTREPRENEUR (3-0-3) 
Examines the highly competitive and dramatically changing national and international finan- 
cial services markets. Utilizing visiting speakers, case studies, and a computer simulation, 
"Bank President's Game," emphasis is placed on understanding the principles and concepts of 
bank management and operations within a complex economic environment. Special emphasis 
is placed on ways in which the entrepreneur selects, works with, and uses his/her bank. 
Prerequisite: Acco 524. 

555,F BANKING AND FINANCIAL INTERMEDIATION (3-0-3) 
Presents the modem theory of financial intermediation, in which banks and other financial 
intermediaries serve not only as brokers of funds, but more importantly, as transformers of 
financial claims. In particular, the material stresses the role of the bank in overcoming problems 
of asymmetric information in the credit markets. Prerequisite: Acco 524. 



" ' "" - ' 165 

556,S APPLIED SECURITY ANALYSIS (3 3) 

Introduces some techniques used in estimating return and risk in evaluating security prices. 

560,S LAW FOR ACCOUNTANTS (3 3) 

Civil law, common law, equity, state and federal court systems, contracts, sales, bailments and 
carriers, bankruptcy, secured transactions. Uniform Commercial Code, and the Uniform 
Partnership Act. Not equivalent of Admn 562. Prerequisites: Acco 501 or equivalent and 
graduate standing. ^ 

561,F LEGAL AND GOVERNMENTAL PROCESSES I (3 3) 

Impact of government on decision making in business, featuring comparisons of governmental 
intervention across major industrial systems; analysis of environmental trends and public policy 
options. Prerequisites: graduate standing and instructor's permission. 

562,S LEGAL AND GOVERNMENTAL PROCESSES II (3 3) 

Law as the medium in which American society and business function; legal history, 
jurisprudential bases, theory and practice of principal kinds of law: common law, statute law, 
constitutional law, and law of government control. Prerequisites: Admn 561 and instructor's 
permission. 

563,F PUBLIC POLICY/PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (3 3) 

The administration and implementation of public policies across federal, state, and substate 
governments. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. Also offered as Poli 537. 

565,F PUBLIC FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3 3) 

Political, economic and accounting dimensions of financial management in public and nonprofit 
organizations. Emphasis on budgeting systems, appropriations processes, cost-benefit analysis, 
taxation, pricing, fund accounting, debt management, and financial administration. Prerequisite: 
instructor's permission. Also offered as Poli 564. 

567,F BUSINESS AND PUBLIC POLICY (3 3) 

Examines the range of business-government relationships with a focus on the public-policy 
decision-making process and the effects of public policy on the business environment. 
Prerequisite: graduate standing and instructor's permission. 

571,F LAW AND FOREIGN POLICY (3 3) 

Examines the making of U.S. foreign policy in a changing world, with emphasis on the role of 
constitutional constraints and opportunities in trade, aid, and diplomacy. In addition to 
examining the basic issues of the separation of powers and the underlying theories of 
constitutional interpretation, the course studies closely a number of trade and commerce 
questions, as well as the more traditional topics of defense policy (weapon sales, arms control) 
that impact trade and aid. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. 

572,S POLITICAL RISK ANALYSIS (303) 

Analyses of political and social factors affecting business operations abroad, including 
domestic instability, foreign conflict, corruption, nationalization, and indigenization. A 
simulation exercise is required. Also offered as Poli 571. 

573,F GLOBAL STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (3-0 3) 

Changes in international competition, techniques for analysis of economic forces, changes in 
governance, and the concepts of competitive strategy and globalization of technology and the 
marketplace. Prerequisite: graduate standing. 

574,S TRANSNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW (3 0-3) 

Topics in U.S. and foreign law as they relate to the law-business interface of importing-exporting- 
trade problems, foreign operations, foreign investments, extraterritorial impact of U.S. law, 
corporate organization, foreign exchange, joint ventures, withdrawal from foreign ventures, and 
third-country manufacturing. Prerequisite: Admn 560 or 562. 



166 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

576,S JAPAN (3-0-3) - ^ - -",-7;.--^ -.-T--r-— - .7^ ;— -. r; 

Examines international aspects of finance, including foreign investment and foreign exchange 
operations. Prerequisite: instructor's permission. 

580,S MARKETING MANAGEMENT (3-0-3) 

Introduces key marketing concepts that underlie the function of marketing in the business 
enterprise and provides a foundation for advanced course work in marketing. Employs lectures 
and extensive analysis of marketing management cases. Prerequisites: graduate standing and 
instructor's permission. 

581,F SALES FORECASTING (3 3) 

Addresses a need in all areas of business, especially marketing, for more accurate forecasts. 
Covers a range of forecasting methods and develops guidelines for selecting the most 
appropriate method for a particular management problem. Includes reading and interpreting 
research in forecasting, collecting and analyzing data for an original forecasting project, and 
presenting the results. Prerequisites: Admn 532 and 580. 

582,S BUSINESS MARKETING (3-0 3) 

Deals specifically with the marketing of goods and services to businesses and other organiza- 
tions. Focuses on the analysis of issues, problems, and opportunities that are characteristic of 
business marketing situations. Emphasis is placed on the formulation and implementation of 
business-to-business marketing strategies. Prerequisite: Admn 580. 

583,F CONSUMER AND ORGANIZATIONAL BUYING BEHAVIOR (3 3) 

Exposes students to the major concepts in the analysis of consumer behavior, with special 
emphasis on managerial implications. Treats both individual and organizational buying behav- 
ior, as well as the analysis of consumption and post-purchase aspects. Prerequisite: Admn 580. 
Second-year M.B.A. and M.Acco. students only. 

584,S PRODUCT MANAGEMENT (3 0-3) 

Applies various dimensions of marketing strategy and management to the role of product 
manager, who is responsible for all aspects of managing the marketing activities of a given 
product. Prerequisite: Admn 580. 

585,F MARKETING STRATEGY (3 3) 

Examines the process of formulating and implementing a marketing strategy to obtain 
organizational goals. Topics include market definition and segmentation, top-down versus 
bottom-up approaches to strategy formulation, positioning, implementation, evaluation, and 
control. Lectures, interactive discussions and computer simulations are employed. Prerequi- 
site: Admn 580. 

586,S MARKETING RESEARCH (3 3) 

Deals with selected marketing research techniques and methods applied in the solution of 
marketing problems. Involves applied research projects to explore the implementation of 
methods in real-life settings. Prerequisite: Admn 580. 

587,F PRICING STRATEGY (3 3) 

Provides a managerial orientation to decision making in pricing. Emphasizes an integration of 
the economics of profit maximization, the psychological aspects of customer response to price, 
and the anticipation of competition. This course uses lectures, discussions, and case analyses to 
provide students with an in-depth study of the various aspects of pricing in a marketing plan. A 
solid understanding of basic quantitative methods is required for this course. Prerequisites: 
Admn 532 and 580. 

588,S INTERNATIONAL MARKETING (3 3) 

Examines the marketing process in an international context. Topics include standardization, 
countertrade, and the strategic implications of global markets. Lectures, interactive discussions, 
and extensive analysis of international marketing cases are employed. Prerequisite: Admn 580. 



167 

589,F DECISION MODELS IN MARKETING (3-0-3) 

Surveys quantitative decision models in marketing, focusing on the use of analytical ap- 
proaches and computer-based models to formulate and solve managerial problems in market- 
ing. Topics include consumer choice, new product decisions, advertising response and 
budgeting decisions, pricing decisions, and sales-force design decisions. A solid understanding 
of basic quantitative methods is required for this course. Prerequisites: Admn 532 and 580. 

591,F MANAGEMENT STRATEGY I (3 0-3) 

Examination of managerial and organizational problems in the private and public sectors which 
illustrate fundamental principles of domestic and international management practice. This 
course integrates key managerial skills taught in other core courses. Extensive use of case 
materials and student presentations. Prerequisite: Acco 524. 

592,S MANAGEMENT STRATEGY II (3 0-3) 

Continuation of Admn 591. 

593,F TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT I (3-0 3) 

Selected topics in management. Section 1 : Production and Operations Management. Prerequi- 
site: permission of instructor. 

594,S TOPICS IN MANAGEMENT II (3-0-3) 

Selected topics in management. Section 1: Management of Technology. Section 2: Statistical 

Quality Control. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

596,S STRATEGIC PLANNING AND CREATIVITY (3 0-3) 

Develops strategic planning skills to help business managers make better short- and long-run 
applied decisions. A central theme is the role of creativity in the planning process as the 
essential features of effective planning systems are examined. Emphasis is on examples of 
excellent planning performed by a variety of actual companies and industries. Prerequisite: 
Admn 591. 

597,F INDEPENDENT STUDY (Variable) 

Independent study or directed reading on an approved project under faculty supervision. 

Enrollment by special permission. 

598,S INDEPENDENT STUDY (Variable) 

See Admn 597. 



168 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations 



Professors Drew, Kelber, R. Mcintosh, S. Mcintosh, 

Van Heiden 

Associate Professors Maas, Sanders, Widrig, Yunis (Director and Advisor) 

Assistant Professors Fishman, Mersereau, Morrison, Nirenberg 



Degree Offered: B.A. 

Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations is an interdisciplinary major that explores 
the cultural traditions of ancient Greece and Rome, Judaism, early Christianity, and 
their antecedents. We study these traditions not only for their intrinsic interest and 
value, but because of their contribution to modem society in the West. Thus as well 
as providing instruction in ancient cultural history in its widest sense, the major offers 
perspectives in cultural criticism, for it examines the beginnings of a civilization in 
which we, the examiners, still participate. To achieve a balanced interdisciplinary 
approach the major is planned around a series of courses from several disciplines that 
all address a common question: What are the vehicles and processes of cultural 
transmission and transformation in the ancient Mediterranean world? This question 
entails the following subordinate questions: What are the texts, artifacts, institutions, 
and ideas through which culture was transmitted and transformed? What are the 
centers and frontiers of the ancient Mediterranean world? How do these shift over 
time? How can processes of integration and disintegration of the ancient Mediterra- 
nean world be understood? The core course and the capstone seminar address these 
questions at length. All the departmental courses address some aspect of these 
questions in a significant way. The major as well provides opportunities for 
archeological field work and study abroad. 

Rice is a sponsor of the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, 
managed by Stanford University. Students in the major are encouraged to study in this 
program as well as in College Year in Athens. 

Requirements: 

1. A student majoring in Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations must complete a 
minimum of 30 semester hours. The requirements are the same regardless whether the 
student is a single or double major. 

2. The student must take the core course (AMC 201): 3 semester hours. This 
course should be taken at or near the beginning of the student's studies in our program. 

3. The student must take at least six courses from the list of departmental courses 
that constitute the major: 18 semester hours. A current list of these courses is 
published in the course catalogue and the annual AMC brochure. There is a 
distribution requirement for the departmental courses: at lest three of these six courses 
must be from different departments. 

4. In addition to the six courses from the list that constitutes the major, the student 
must take two "cognate" courses: 6 semester hours. Cognate courses are courses from 
outside the major, but which either relate to Mediterranean cultures and their legacies 
or to the processes of cultural transmission and transformation outside the Mediter- 
ranean. The cognate courses should be chosen in consultation with the advisor. A list 
of pre-approved cognate courses is available from the advisor. The student may 
request that other courses count as cognate courses; the advisor has discretion. 



169 

5. The student must take the capstone seminar (AMC 401) at or near the end of 
his or her study in the program: 3 semester hours. 

Courses: 

Core Course ' :^. iH < .^ ; 



201,S INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CIVILIZA- 
TIONS (3-0-3) 
This course addresses the common question that provides the focus for the study of the ancient 
Mediterranean world: What are the vehicles and processes of cultural transmission and 
transformation in the ancient Mediterranean world? Readings and discussion cover the ancient 
Near East, Greece. Rome, and the Hellenistic world. Guest lectures from other faculty in the 
AMC program. Required for AMC majors, but open to all. No prerequisites. 

Yunis, H. 

Capstone Seminar 



401,S INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR IN ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN 

CIVILIZATIONS (3 0-3) 
Required for juniors and seniors majoring in AMC. 

Morrison, D. 

Departmental Courses 

Classical Studies 

335,S CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY (3 3) 

Staff 

History 



273/373,F POST-BIBLICAL JEWISH HISTORY I: PRE-CHRISTIAN ERA 
TO SPANISH EXPULSION (3 3) 

Fishman. T. 

281/381,F HISTORY OF THE ISLAMIC NEAR EAST, 600-1285 (3 3) 

Sanders. P. 



307,S THE ROMAN EMPIRE FROM AUGUSTUS TO JULIAN (31 BC - AD 

363) (3-0-3) 

Elton, H. 



320,F SCIENCE IN ANTIQUITY AND THE MIDDLE AGES (3 3) 

Van Helden, A. 



337,F HISTORY OF ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL LAW (3-0 3) 

Drew. K. 



170 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



436,S WARFARE IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE (31 BC - AD 476) (3-0-3) 



Elton, H. 



439,S CHRISTIANITY AND THE WEST: FROM THE BARBARIANS TO 
BEOWULF (3-0-3) 

Nirenberg, D. 

-AxiJivij >/:aoi 



History of Art 



jijbivon} jerij r 



308,S ROMAN ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY (3-0-3) 



491,F THE CITY OF ATHENS (3-0-3) 



Mersereau, R. 



Mersereau, R. 



Philosophy 

201,F HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY I (3-0-3) 



Kinx'an, C. 



Religious Studies 

307,F HELLENISTIC JUDAISM AND CHRISTIAN ORIGINS (3-0-3) 

Kelber. W. 



ire the 



o^^ 



171 

Anthropology 



?^ - Professor Marcus, Chair 

Professors Fischer, R.J. Mcintosh, S.K. Mcintosh, and Tyler 
• ' ' Associate Professors Taylor and Traweek 

Adjunct Associate Professor Gibson 
Assistant Professors Georges and Milun 

,. Degrees Ojfered.B. A.. M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program: Anthropology is a discipline that encompasses many 
subjects of study, all related to understanding human beings and their cultures. A 
student may organize a major in one or more of anthropology ' s principal fields or may 
combine a major in anthropology with one in another discipline. Students majoring in 
anthropology are required to take a total of 30 semester hours in anthropology (ten 
semester courses). Majors must devise a plan of study in consultation with a faculty 
adviser. Although there are no required courses, students will be encouraged to gain 
exposure to all of the principal fields within anthropology (archaeology; biological, 
cuhural, and linguistic anthropology). On declaring a major in anthropology, a student 
should meet with the departmental undergraduate adviser in order to tailor a major plan 
in line with the student's interests. This plan can be modified at any time with the 
approval of the adviser. 

With departmental approval, a maximum of 6 semester hours (two courses) 
outside of anthropology but related to the student's plan of study may be substituted 
for hours/courses in anthropology. Majors who plan to pursue graduate training 
toward a career in anthropology will need a reading knowledge of one or two European 
languages and are urged to enroll in undergraduate language courses. These majors are 
also urged to apply for admission to the honors program. 

Honors Program. The primary purpose of the Honors Program is to provide 
selected undergraduate majors with an opportunity to receive advanced training, 
particularly in the planning and execution of independent research, within their chosen 
areas of specialization in anthropology. A secondary purpose of the program is to 
establish an administrative framework for the formal recognition of outstanding 
students. Majors considering a career in anthropology are strongly encouraged to 
apply, as are all others who desire the experience of an intensive, individual research 
project as part of their undergraduate education. 

Acceptance into the program is at the discretion of the anthropology faculty. A 
statement of eligibility requirements and program requirements is available in the 
departmental office. 

Graduate Program. The graduate program offers advanced training in social/ 
cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, and archaeology, leadmg to a Ph.D. in 
anthropology. The M. A. is optionally offered upon approval of candidacy for the Ph.D. 
The M.A. as a terminal degree requires satisfactory completion of 30 semester hours 
of course work approved by an adviser, satisfactory completion of one of the special 
papers (see uniform requirements for the Ph.D.), and a thesis. Although there are 
uniform requirements for the Ph.D. degree, each field of specialization offers different 
opportunities for training and different topical research orientations reflecting the 
interests of the faculty. Consequently, the Department seeks applicants with a defined 
interest in one of the broad fields of specialization within anthropology. An under- 



1 72 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

graduate background in anthropology is desirable but not required for admission. In 
consultation with a major adviser and two other faculty members, each entering 
student is expected to design a flexible study plan that emphasizes broad training in 
a field of specialization and the eventual definition of a problem for dissertation 
research. All first-year students can usually be offered some form of support, ranging 
from full graduate fellowships, which provide tuition plus a stipend, to tuition 
scholarships only. When possible, these awards are renewed for the three years of 
study. 

Specialization in Social/Cultural Anthropology. The faculty is eclectic in its 
interests, and the program offers exposure to styles of argument and reasoning across 
the range of contemporary theoretical issues in social/cultural anthropology. We 
emphasize the reading of primary sources of theory, which have inspired the discussion 
and definition of central problems within anthropology. In addition, as essential 
preparation for doctoral research, explicit attention in instruction is paid both to field 
work and to skills in the conception and writing of ethnography. Students interested 
in medical anthropology may take advantage of the extensive resources of the Houston 
Medical Center through ties established with the University of Texas School of Public 
Health and Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences. In addition to work at Rice, 
degree credit may be given for formal courses offered at the Schools of Public Health 
and Biomedical Sciences. 

Specialization in Archaeology. Training emphasizes research skills in the li- 
brary, field, and laboratory, to be tested by means of the three required research papers, 
at least one of which must be an original data paper. In addition to research on the 
dissertation topic, all students are encouraged to develop at least one analytical skill 
I such as remote sensing, archaeological statistics, osteology, geomorphology, and 
pedology I making use of the excellent laboratory and computer facilities at Rice. 

Uniform Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Each entering 
student will devise a detailed first year plan of study and provisional plans for 
succeeding years in consultation with his or her advisers. Seminars and tutorials can 
be arranged on any topic relevant to a student's training, and where appropriate, these 
can be conducted in supervisory consultation with scholars in other disciplines at Rice 
as well as with adjunct faculty. During the first two years of study, each student will 
prepare three substantial papers, each emphasizing an analytical, research, and 
writing skill appropriate to the field of specialization. The subjects of the papers and 
their scheduling are major considerations in the ongoing consultations between 
students and their advisers. During the course of study, each student must demonstrate 
reading competency in one foreign language. Before advancing to Ph.D. candidacy, a 
student must prepare a satisfactory proposal for dissertation research. Following 
approval of the research proposal, a dissertation committee is appointed. Dissertations 
are ordinarily based in substantial part upon field research. 

Anthropology Courses . u j-r 

200,F/S LANGUAGE (3-0-3) oao^dmcifiatsoio. 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

An introduction to the scientific study of language. The methods of linguistic prehistory. The 

language families of the world and the interrelationship of language and thought. Also offered 

as Ling 200. 



173 

201,F INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL/CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3- 

0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

An introduction to the history, methods, and concepts of the discipline devoted to the systematic 
description and understanding of cultural diversity in human societies. 

Stajf 

202 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

The evolution, genetics, and adaptive significance of human biological differences. Includes an 
examination of the fossil record of human evolution as well as patterns of and explanations for 
variability in modern human populations. Not offered 1992-93. 

Stajf 

205,F INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Principles and methods of archaeology; an introduction to the elementary concepts of the 
discipline through a series of case studies. 

Mcintosh, R. 

211 EARLY CIVILIZATIONS (3 3) 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

A comparative study of the civilizations of Mesopotamia. Egypt, the Indus. China, and the 

Maya, emphasizing the couses and conditions of their origins. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

216 INTRODUCTION TO WORLD PREHISTORY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Survey of the world's past cultures. Emphasis on major archaeological discoveries from Olduvai 
Gorge to Pompeii. Not offered 1992-93. 

Stafj 

ll'\ THE CULTURE OF ANCIENT GREECE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Readings from the tragedians, the poets, and the philosophers, emphasizing topics such as family 
life, sexuality, mental health, discourse, and communications. Summary of the prehistory and 
ethnology of the Greeks. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

260 LATIN AMERICAN TOPICS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Focuses on the widely shared socioeconomic, political, and cultural themes as seen over history 
and in current events. Not offered 1992-93. 

Stafj- 

300,S LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

English and other languages as objects of scientific analysis. Phonological structure, morphology 
and syntax, semantic structures, and techniques of linguistic analysis. Also offered as Ling 300. 

Copeland. J. 

301,F PHONOLOGY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Theory and practice of articulatory phonetics and of methods of determining the structural 
patterns which underlie speech sounds. Also offered as Ling 301. 

Staff 



1 74 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

305,S HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

The nature of language change in its social and geographical contexts from the perspective of 
language acquisition. Also offered as Ling 305. 

Staff 

306 HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL IDEAS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

An introduction to the history of anthropology, its theories, and methods. The emphasis is upon 
social and cultural anthropology. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

308,F HISTORY AS A CULTURAL MYTH (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Ideas of history and attitudes toward the past as culturally conditioned phenomena. Emphasizes 
history as statement of cultural values as well as conceptualizations of cause, change, time, and 
reality. 

Taylor, J. 

309,S CULTURAL STUDIES OF SCIENCE (3-0-3) 

Comparative study of the way sciences and engineering are practiced in different settings: 
1) relations between socialization (training), the production of knowledge, and power; 2) 
relations between local practices and international relations in sciences and engineering; and 3) 
the role of gender, race and class in different scientific and engineering cultures. 

Traweek, S. 

312,F AFRICAN PREHISTORY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Thematic coverage of developments throughout the continent from the Lower Paleolithic to 
medieval times, with emphasis on food production, metallurgy and the rise of cities and complex 
societies. 

Mcintosh, R. 

313,F LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Investigates the relation between language and thought, language and world view, language and 
logic. Also offered as Ling 313. 

Tyler, S. 

314 ORALITY, LITERACY AND CULTURE (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

The study of sociocultural traditions based on their dominant mode of communication: oral, 
literate or electronic. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

315 EMPIRICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Reviews the answers sought to the questions, "What is man?" "What are the limits of human 
knowledge?" and "How should we lead our lives?" with focus on the works of anthropologists 
and of philosophers. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

316 SHAMANISM (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

This course covers the ethnography of shamanism in foraging societies of the world and assesses 
the body of theory and comparative work on the subject since the middle 19th century. Offered 
occasionally. 

Staff 



175 

319,F SYMBOLISM AND POWER (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

This course will use both traditional and contemporary readings to emphasize the trend in 
cultural analysis from a view of culture as monolithic and static to perceptions that any culture 
is internally varied and contradictory as well as changing and complex. 

Taylor, J. 

326 THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF LAW (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Social conflict and methods of dispute management in Western and non-Western societies. 
Comparison of legal institutions in band, tribal, early state, and complex industrial societies. 
Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

327,S GENDER AND SYMBOLISM (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Examinations of beliefs concerning men, women, and gender in different cultures, including the 
West, relating to issues of symbolism, power, and the distribution of cultural models. 

Taylor, J. 

333,F CONTEMPORARY TRENDS IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL 
THEORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

British functionalism, analytic philosophy, French structuralism, neo-Marxism, phenomenol- 
ogy, hermeneutics, and ethnomethodology. An intensive review of the major sources of theory 
guiding research in contemporary anthropology. Strongly recommended for majors and for 
students in the humanities. 

Fischer. M. 

335,F ANTHROPOLOGY AS CULTURAL CRITIQUE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

The critical assessment and interpretation of Euroamerican social institutions and cultural forms 
have always been an integral part of anthropology "s intellectual project. This course will explain 
the techniques, history, and achievements of such critique. It will also view the purpose in the 
context of a more general tradition of critical social thought in the West, especially the U.S. 

Marcus, G. 

336 THE ART OF ETHNOGRAPHY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.4 

A seminar that explores the experience of doing field work and the problems of transforming 
theory, field experience, and data into a written account. Emphasis is on reading field work 
accounts and gaining ethnographic writing skills. Strongly recommended for majors but also for 
other interested students in the social sciences and humanities. Not offered 1992-93. 

338.F READING POPULAR CULTURE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.4 

The course examines a number of cases from popular genres -- romance novels, television sit- 
coms, tourist sites, movies, rock music -- and submits them to a variety of theoretical 
approaches from disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, literarv studies and philosophv. 

Miliin. k. 

340,S CAMERA AND CULTURE ( 3-0 3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.4 

How photographs come to be produced and read as documentary evidence in science, law, 
history, anthropology and families. How photographs and photographic technology shape and 
are shaped by the cultures in which they are used as a case study in the relations between 
technology and culture. 

Traweek. S. 



1 76 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

341,S ETHNOGRAPHIC FILM & THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

This course focuses on visual media of documentation and description in anthropology, 
especially on the historical and contemporary relationships between ethnographic film and 
writing. In addition, the course will place the development of ethnographic film in the context 
of documentary and narrative film, as well as other media such as television and video. During 
the course students will be able to view several exemplars of ethnographic film and other media. 
Ethnography is the heart of cultural anthropology - both fundamental and representative of it. 
Film and media are this form's future which makes it touch on experiences common to most 
students, thus defining its accessibility. 

Fischer, M. & Marcus, G. 

342,S POLITICAL CINEMA (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

This course concerns the study of films whose rhetoric and commentary are explicitly political 
— as opposed to the dominant film trend which is to hide political tendentiousness. We will look 
at various traditions of political filmmaking including early Soviet film, German and American 
film of the 1 930s and 1 940s, West European films which challenged the communist state, leftist 
cinema from Italy, France and England, current work by minority and feminist filmmakers in 
the U.S. and the emergent cinema of countries such as Brazil and Senegal. 

Milun. K. 

345 THE PERSON ACROSS CULTURES (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Course discussions and lectures will be built around the central issue of whether the "indi- 
vidual", or the "self, is uniquely an Euroamerican cultural idea or whether it is universally an 
aspect of personhood in all cultures. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

347 THE CULTURE OF EXPERTISE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

How experts and expertise, primarily in science and technology, shape and are shaped by their 
professional communities, national policies, and international political, economic, and intellec- 
tual relations. Not offered 1992-93. 

■r-, ■ - -i'v ')■ .-, :;v ,: Staff 

348 AMERICA AS A CULTURE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Explorations in community studies, symbolic anthropology, literary criticism, religion, and 
politics. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

350 INDIANS OF THE AMERICAS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Examines the cultures of Native American peoples throughout the New World. Both pre- and 
post-contact cultural patterns will be discussed with an emphasis on native and European 
reactions and responses. Offered occasionally. 

Staff 

353,F CULTURES OF INDIA (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Summary of the prehistory, ethnography, and ethnology of the Indian subcontinent. Special 
emphasis on Hinduism. Buddhism, and Indian philosophy. 

Tyler. S. 

354 WOMEN IN NON-WESTERN SOCIETIES (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.4 

Examines the statuses and roles of women in the world's non-western societies. Special 
attention is given to symbolic depictions of women along with the relationship of women to the 
worlds of work, family and politics. Offered occasionally. 

Staff 



177 

355,F CULTURAL STUDIES OF JAPAN (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Anthropological studies of diverse experiences of education, work, community, nation, person, 
family, gender, power, and region in Japan. 

Traweek. S. 

356 ETHNOGRAPHY OF TRIBAL PEOPLE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Some "people", for example, the Nuer, the Samoans, the Australian aborigines, the Hopi and 
the Navajo, have been studied by anthropologists for decades and in a few cases almost a 
century. This course will review the studies for a particular people, discussing change and 
permanence in their anthropological description and other related issues. Offered occasionally. 

Staff 

358 THE FOURTH WORLD: ISSUES OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

In contrast with people self-identified within political structures of the First, Second and Third 
Worlds, Fourth World peoples are, generally speaking, "stateless peoples." In this course we 
will examine both how this "unofficial" status affects their struggle for self-determination and 
how native peoples engage traditional beliefs and practices for self-empowerment. Through 
readings, films and speakers we will examine current conflicts facing indigenous peoples in 
North and South America, the Soviet Union, Europe, Asia and Australia. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

360,S MODERNITY AND SOCIAL SPACE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 4 

Modernity can be usefully described as the transmutation of time and space. In this course we 
will focus on specific changes in the production of social space. How, for example, is global 
space produced -- legally, in international law, economically by multinational corporations, 
and culturally through satellite communications systems? While changes in the public spaces 
of urban/suburban America tell us something about the values of those who produce such space, 
they also tell us about the cultural and political consciousness/unconsciousness of those who 
use it. Theories from a variety of disciplines will be mobilized to help us understand these 
changes in social space. 

Milun.K. 

362,S ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD TECHNIQUES (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Methods used in field work, laboratory analysis, and interpretation of archaeological data from 
a local site excavated by the class. Prerequisite: Anth 205. 

,^1, Mcintosh. R. 

365 CULTURAL ECOLOGY AND THE ANCIENT LANDSCAPE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

The interaction of human geography (cultural ecology) and the physical landscape (geomor- 
phologv and physical geography ) as applied to past and present settlement on major floodplains. 
Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

367,S HUMAN EVOLUTION (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Overview of the fossil evidence for human evolution, focusing on when and why our uniquely 
human characteristics appeared. 

Mcintosh, S. 

368 PRIMATOLOGY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

An introduction to primate diversity, ecology, and sociality, based on what is now known from 
field studies of wild primate populations. Offered occasionallv. 

Staff 



1 78 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

370 SOCIOBIOLOGY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Explores the evolutionary biology of social behavior in non-human primates and other animals 
before examining the extent to which these principles are or are not applicable to human beings. 
Offered occasionally. 

Staff 

381,F MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Cultural, ecological, and biological perspectives on human health and disease throughout the 
world. 

.'li-Mi'it'-j !i3rilntt. Staff 

383 HUMAN ADAPTATION (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 — ^^ - ^'- 
Explanations for the range and patterns of human biological differences in the context of theories 
of adaptation. Integrates themes from human genetics, physiology, and cultural studies. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

386,S HUMAN NUTRITION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

The anthropology of eating: nutrient requirements; assessment of nutritional status; food 
selection; symbolic, psychological, and cultural aspects of food and food consumption. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

388,S THE LIFE-CYCLE: A BIOCULTURAL VIEW (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

The human life cycle from conception to death. Focus is on the interaction between biological 
processes and culture. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

402,F SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Study of semantic categories and their formal expression in morphological, syntactic, and lexical 
units and patterns. Also offered as Ling 402. 

Davis. P. 

404,F/S INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 3) 

Directed reading and preparation of written papers on anthropological subjects not offered in the 
curriculum and advanced study of subjects on which courses are offered. 

Staff 

406,S COGNITIVE STUDIES IN ANTHROPOLOGY AND LINGUISTICS 

(3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 ' "'' ' ' 

Relations between thought, language, and culture. Special emphasis given to natural systems 
of classification and the logical principles underlymg them. Also offered as Linguistics 406. 

Tyler, S. 

407,F FIELD TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS (3-0-3) 

Techniques and practice in the observation, analysis, and recording of a human language. Also 

offered as Ling 407. 

. , ^ ^ ; \ Davis. P. 

408,S FIELD TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS (3 3) 

Continuation of Anth 407. Also offered as Ling 408. 

■■'■" ■•'■ Davis. P. 



179 

410 THE ETHNOGRAPHY OF DEVELOPMENT (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

This course suggests the necessity of a solid ethnographic grounding for both practical 
develoopment work and for further intellectual growth of the discipline. Offered occasionally. 

Staff 

411 NEUROLINGUISTICS: LANGUAGE AND THE BRAIN (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Organization of the brain: localization of speech, language, and memory functions; hemispheric 
dominance; and pathologies of speech and language associated with brain damage. Also offered 
al Ling 41 1. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

412,S RHETORIC (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Overview of classical theories. Intensive discussion of contemporary theories and applications 
in a wide variety of disciplines. Also offered as Ling 410. 

Tyler, S. 

414 HERMENEUTICS AND LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3 0-3) 
Application of linguistic theory and method in the analysis of cultural materials. Discourse 
analysis; the structure and interpretation of texts and conversation. Also offered as Ling 4 1 4. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

415 THEORIES IN MODERNITY/POSTMODERNITY: I (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

An advanced course for graduate students and undergraduate majors with interests in the 
interdisciplinary field of cultural studies. Readings in the work of Saussure, Gadamer, Derrida, 
Bahktin, Foucault, and others. Several papers are required that emphasize the application of 
ideas to cultural analysis of contemporary life. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

416,F THEORIES IN MODERNITY/POSTMODERNITY: II (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Part one focuses on the relation between critical theory and post-structuralism. Readings from 
Marx. Althusser. Adomo, and Habermas cover basic concepts like ideology, reification, etc. 
Part two looks at new analytical categories of social analysis such as the body, global culture, 
space, etc. 

Milan, K. 

418,F POSTMODERN GLOBAL & LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS (3-0 3) 
Organizations have been theorized as structures, functions, networks, discursive sites, and 
gendered bodies; they have been read as dispersed, totalizing, isolated, monopolizing, ephem- 
eral, contested, virtual, interactive, cultured, or static. We will study their material practices 
in post-modem political economies, globally and locally, and organizations as a theoretical 
site. 

Traweek. S. 

420 ARCHAEOLOGY OF PREHISTORIC ART (3-0 3) 

Critical evaluation of interpretations of ancient rock art. with concentration on the Rice Lower 
Pecos project. Students will learn the Apple program developed for this project and will take field 
trips to the rock shelter sites. Prerequisite: Anth 205. Offered occasionally. 

Stajf 

446 ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOMEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3 3) 

Seminar on contemporary research on the biomedical aspects of human health and disease. 
Includes topics from medical ecology and epidemiology. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 



1 80 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

458,S HUMAN OSTEOLOGY (3-0-3) " "-^ ^^'' ^5^^0V'H-:^ ^"T 

Introduction to the analysis of human skeletal material from archaeological sites. 

Mcintosh, S. 

460,S ADVANCED ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY (3-0-3) 
History and analysis of the major currents of archaeological theory from the Encyclopaedist 
origins of positivism, through cultural evolutionism and historical particularism, to the New 
Archaeology and current trends. Prerequisite: Anth 205. 

Mcintosh, R. 

463 WEST AFRICAN PREHISTORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBTUION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 

Seminar providing in depth consideration of the later prehistoric archaeology (late stone age 

and Iron Age) of the West African sub-continent. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

490,F DIRECTED HONORS RESEARCH (3-0-3) 

A two-semester sequence of independent research culminating in the preparation and defense 

of an honors thesis. Open only to candidates formally accepted into the honors program. 

Staff 

491,S DIRECTED HONORS RESEARCH (3 3) 

See Anth 490. 

Staff 

501,F SOCIAL/CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3-0-3) 

Staff 

506 HISTORY OF ANTHROPOLOGICAL IDEAS (3 0-3) 
See Anth 306. 

Staff 



508,F HISTORY AS A CULTURAL MYTH (3-0-3) v^ .-ii 

See Anth 308. 



509,S CULTURAL STUDIES OF SCIENCE (3-0-3) 
See Anth 309. 



512,F AFRICAN PREHISTORY (3-0-3) 
See Anth 312. 



513,F LANGUAGE AND CULTURE (3-0-3) 
See Anth 313. 



514 ORALITY, LITERACY AND CULTURE (3 0-3) 
See Anth 314. 



Taylor, J. 



Traweek. S. 



Mcintosh, R. 



Tyler. S. 



Staff 



515 EMPIRICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3 3) 

See Anth 315. 

13 MOW yi\ Staff 



• ■ 181 

516 SHAMANISM (3-0 3) 
SeeAnth316. 

Staff 

519,F SYMBOLISM AND POWER (3 3) 

See Anth319. 

Taylor, J. 

527,S GENDER AND SYMBOLISM (3-0 3) 
See Anth 327. 

Taylor, J. 

533,F CONTEMPORARY TRENDS IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL 
THEORY (3 3) 

See Anth 333. 

Fischer, M. 

535,F ANTHROPOLOGY AS CULTURAL CRITIQUE (3 3) 

See Anth 335. 

Marcus, G. 

536 THE ART OF ETHNOGRAPHY (3-0 3) 
See Anth 336. 

Stajf 

538,F READING POPULAR CULTURE (3-0 3) 
See Anth 338. 

Milun, K. 

540,S CAMERA AND CULTURE (3 3) 

See Anth 340. 

Traweek. S. 

541,S ETHNOGRAPHIC FILM AND THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (3-0 3) 
See Anth 341. 

Fischer, M. & Marcus, G. 



542,S POLITICAL CINEMA (3 3) 

See Anth 342. 



545 THE PERSON ACROSS CULTURES (3 3) 

See Anth 345. 



547 CULTURE OF EXPERTISE (3 0-3) 
See Anth 347. 



548 AMERICA AS A CULTURE (3-0-3) 
See Anth 348. 



550 INDIANS OF THE AMERICAS (3 3) 

See Anth 350. 



Milun, K. 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



1 82 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

553,F CULTURES OF INDIA (3-0-3) " '' ' "-^'^ 

SeeAnth353. I 'n.m 

Tyler. S. 

554 WOMEN IN NON-WESTERN SOCIETIES (3-0-3) 
See Anth 354. 

Staff 

555,F CULTURAL STUDIES OF JAPAN (3 3) . 

See Anth 355. 

Staff 

556 ETHNOGRAPHY OF TRIBAL PEOPLE (3 0-3) '^z J "'* 

See Anth 356. 

Staff 

558 THE FOURTH WORLD: ISSUES OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLES (3 3) 

See Anth 358. 

Staff 

560,S MODERNITY AND SOCIAL SPACE (3 0-3) 

See Anth 360. 'HT:>I 10 T 

Milun. K. 

562,S ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD TECHNIQUES (3 3) 

See Anth 362. 

Mcintosh. R. 

565 CULTURAL ECOLOGY AND THE ANCIENT LANDSCAPE (3 3) 

See Anth 365. 

Staff 

567,S HUMAN EVOLUTION (3 3) 

See Anth 367. [T Q/' A f/5 JH ' >1H*J AHi. 

Mcintosh . S. 

568 PRIMATOLOGY (3 3) >♦ ' ■ 

See Anth 368. , f-O-f, ) AM JV!I3 JAL», 

Staff 

570 SOCIOBIOLOGY (3 3) 

See Anth 370. i:3>VJTlU) 820H3A ^.OZi 

Staff 

581,F MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3 3) 

See Anth 381. ITSaSfZHlO 3. 

Georges, E. 

583 HUMAN ADAPTATION (3 3) 

See Anth 383. -0-fJ SHJTJ'J^ A 8A A: 

Staff 

586,S HUMAN NUTRITION (3 3) ' ^' ^ 

See Anth 386. £ , iJA3lH3MA SHT '40 

Georges, E. 

588,S LIFE CYCLE: A BIOCULTURAL VIEW (3 3) 

See Anth 388. 

Georges, E. 



183 

600,F/S INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 0-3) 

- Stajf 

601,F GRADUATE PROSEMINAR IN ANTHROPOLOGY (3 3) 

Mapping the current fields of anthropological discourses, examining the debates in and between 
each of these fields, and discussing how these debates are conducted in the domains of fieldwork, 
ethnographic writing, and in the construction of careers in anthropology. 

Fischer, M. & Marcus, G. 

606,S COGNITIVE STUDIES IN ANTHROPOLOGY AND LINGUISTICS 

(3-0-3) 
See Anth 406. 

Tyler, S. 

607,F FIELD TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS (3 3) 

See Anth 407. 

Davis, P. 

608,S FIELD TECHNIQUES AND ANALYSIS (3-0-3) 
See Anth 408. 

Davis, P. 

610 THE ETHNOGRAPHY OF DEVELOPMENT (3-0 3) 
See Anth 410. 

Stajf 

611 NEUROLINGUISTICS: LANGUAGE AND THE BRAIN (3-0-3) 
See Anth 411. 

Staff 

612,S RHETORIC (3 3) 

See Anth 412. 

Tyler, S. 

614 HERMENEUTICS AND LINGUISTIC ANTHROPOLOGY (3 3) 

See Anth 414. 

Staff 

615 THEORIES IN MODERNITY/POSTMODERNITY: I (3 3) 

See Anth 415. 

Staff 

616,F THEORIES IN MODERNITY/POSTMODERNITY: II (3 3) 

See Anth 416. 

Milun, K. 

618,F POSTMODERN GLOBAL & LOCAL ORGANIZATIONS (3-0 3) 
See Anth 418. 

Traweek, S. 

620 ARCHAEOLOGY OF PREHISTORIC ART (3 3) 

See Anth 420. 

Staff 

646 ADVANCED TOPICS IN BIOMEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (3 3) 

See Anth 446. 

Staff 



1 84 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

658,S HUMAN OSTEOLOGY (3-0-3) ) YQ' IT2 TVia<P 

See Anth 458. 

Mcintosh, S. 

660,S ADVANCED ARCHAEOLOGICAL THEORY (3-0-3) 
See Anth 460. 

.... ;.. : — ,Q.. Mcintosh. R. , 



663 WEST AFRICAN PREHISTORY (3-0 3) 

See Anth 463. ^HTh 37ITi 



800,F/S RESEARCH AND THESIS (Credit variable) 

(£-0-£) 818yj//A a^^A 83U9WHD^i QJ 

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J 185 

School of Architecture 



Professors Cannady and Casbarian 

Professor Emeritus Todd 

Associate Professors Parsons, Pope, Sherman, and Wittenberg 

Assistant Professors Ingersoll, McKee, and Wamble 

Lecturers Bavinger, Blackburn, Colaco, DeLaura, Ford, 

Taylor, White, and Reiner 

Visiting Critics Baker, Robles, and Samuels 



Degrees Offered: B.A., B. Arch., M. Arch., M.Arch. in Urban Design, D.Arch. 

The School of Architecture seeks to contribute through teaching and research to 
a more humane environment. Its primary educational missions are teaching and 
research, development of a broad liberal education for undergraduates in the allied 
sciences and arts of architecture, and professional education at the graduate and 
postgraduate level in architecture and urban design. 

These programs are offered in the setting of a small school to provide intimate 
student-faculty interaction, freedom for learning, and unrestricted institutional coop- 
eration within and outside the University. 

Degrees Offered. Five degrees are offered: Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of 
Architecture, Master of Architecture, Master of Architecture in Urban Design, and 
Doctor of Architecture. The Bachelor of Arts, a liberal arts degree, is awarded after 
successful completion of the first four years of study. Rice students who have 
completed or will complete the four-year B.A. with a major in architecture may apply 
for admission to the Bachelor of Architecture program, which requires two additional 
years of work, one of which is an in-service preceptorship in a professional office. 

The master's degrees are awarded after successful completion of a minimum of 
two years of study beyond the B.A., depending upon previous undergraduate and 
professional studies. Recipients of the B.A. degree from Rice normally undertake a 
minimum of three semesters of further work for one of the Master of Architecture 
degrees. Approval of Rice students for admission to either bachelor's or master's 
programs is contingent upon evaluation of the student's undergraduate academic 
record at the conclusion of the fourth year of study. The Master of Architecture is an 
accredited first professional degree, whereas the Master of Architecture in Urban 
Design requires prior or concurrent completion of accredited bachelor's or master's 
degrees. 

Undergraduate Program. For both the B.A. and the B.Arch. degrees, the first 
two years center upon a carefully integrated study of the principles of architecture. In 
the third and fourth years, students are encouraged to develop their own interests 
through more specialized study of particular aspects of the field in studio, seminar, and 
lecture courses. 

Below is a suggested course of study for either the B.A. or the B . Arch, degree. The 
order in which courses are taken is optional, subject to the following exceptions: ( 1 ) 
health and physical education must be taken in the first year, and (2) failure to take 
prerequisite courses in the earlier years may result in later scheduling problems. 



1 86 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Typical Curriculum 



First semester (fall): 
Architecture 101a — 

Principles of Architecture I 

(studio); Tinartg ,9qo«l 

History of Art 205a — 

Introduction to the History of Art; 
Natural Science 101a — 

Introduction to the Physical 

Sciences; 
Humanities 101a — 

Introduction to Humanities; '--' 

Physical Education 101. 



Third semester (fall): 
Architecture 201a — 

Principles of Architecture II 

(studio); 
History of Art 345a — Renaissance 

and Baroque Architecture; 
Architecture 213a — Structural 

and Constructional Systems I; 

an elective in studio art; 

an elective 
Ifc.i in architectural theory. 

Fifth semester (fall): 
Architecture 301a — Principles 

of Architecture III (studio); 
Architecture3 15a — Intermediate 

Architectural Technology; 

an elective in the social sciences; 
an elective in studio art or visual 

communications; 

one other course. 

Seventh semester (fall): 
Architecture 401a — Principles 

of Architecture IV (studio); 

an elective in environmental 

sciences; 
, two other courses. 



Second semester (spring): 
Architecture 102b — 

Principles of Architecture I 

(studio); 
History of Art 206b — 

Introduction to the History of Art; 
Architecture 132b — Changing 

Perspectives of Architecture; 
Natural Science 101b — 

Introduction to the Physical 

Sciences; 
Humanities 101b — 

Introduction to Humanities; 
Physical Education 10 

Fourth semester (spring): 
Architecture 202b — 

Principles of Architecture II 
(studio); 
History of Art 346b — 

Modem Architecture; 
Architecture 214b — Structural 

and Constructional Systems II; 
Social Sciences 102 — 

Intellectual Foundations of the So- 
cial Sciences; 

one other course 
Sixth semester (spring): 
Architecture 302b — Selected 

Architectural Problems I (studio); 
Architecture 316b — Intermediate 

Architectural Technology; 

an elective in social science; 

two other courses. 



Eighth semester (spring): 
Architecture 402b — Selected 

Architectural Problems II (studio); 

an elective in environmental 

sciences; 

two other courses. 



187 

The four-semester Bachelor of Architecture sequence complements the 
preprofessional undergraduate architecture major offered at Rice. It begins with a two- 
semester preceptorship (Architecture 500a, b — Preceptorship I and II) assigned to 
graduating seniors in the offices of leading practitioners in the United States and 
abroad. The preceptorship is followed by two semesters of studio and course work at 
the graduate level. 



Preceptors 



Arquitectonica 
Coral Gables, Florida 



Machado & Silvetti Assoc, Inc. 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Ray Bailey Architects, Inc. 
Houston, Texas 



Mitchell/Giurgola Architects 
New York, New York 



CRSS, Inc. 
Houston, Texas 



Morphosis 

Los Angeles, California 



Cambridge Seven Associates 
Cambridge, Massachusetts 



Barton Myers Associates 
Los Angeles, California 



Eisenman Architects 
New York, New York 



Pei Cobb Freed & Partners 
New York, New York 



Ellerbe/Beckett Architects 
Minneapolis, Minnesota 



Cesar Pelli & Associates 
New Haven, Connecticut 



Gensler and Associates 
San Francisco, California 



Renzo Piano Building Workshop 
Paris. France 



Michael Graves, Architects 
Princeton, New Jersey 



Skidmore, Owings & Merrill 
Chicago, Illinois 



Hellmuth, Ogata, & Kassabaum, Inc. 
Santa Monica, California 



Skidmore, Owings & Merrill 
Los Angeles, California 



Wilhelm Holzbauer. Architekt 
Vienna, Austria 



Skidmore. Owings & Merrill 
New York. New York 



Kaplan/McLaughlin/Diaz 
San Francisco, California 



Robert A.M. Stem Architects 
New York, New York 



R.M. Kliment & Frances Halsband 
New York, New York 



Studio Antonio Citterio e Terry Dwan 
Milan, Italy 



Kohn, Pedersen & Fox, Architects 
New York. New York 



Taller de Arquitectura 
Barcelona. Spain 



Lake Flato Architects 
San Antonio. Texas 



Venturi, Scott-Brown & Associates 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 



188 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Typical Curriculum 

First semester (fall): Second semester (spring): 

Architecture 500a — Preceptorship I. Architecture 500b — Preceptorship II. 

Third semester (fall): Fourth semester (spring): 

Architecture 601a — Architecture 602b — 

Architectural Problems (studio) or Architectural Problems (studio) or 

Architecture 603a — Urban Design Architecture 604b — 

Workshop; Urban Design Problems (studio) or 

two elective courses " Architecture 702b — Design 

Thesis (studio) 
two elective courses to satisfy 
minimum degree requirement 
of four approved electives. 

Architecture 607a — Design Thesis (seminar) is a prerequisite for Architecture 
608b. At least one urban design studio must be completed before graduation either as 
part of the preprofessional undergraduate major or as part of the Bachelor of Architec- 
ture program. Students must also take at least one elective course in urban design and 
two in building design. 

The following information outlines the requirements for undergraduate degrees in 
the School of Architecture: 

1. For a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Architecture the 

requirements are 96 semester hours credit chosen from architecture and 
nondepartmental listings in a manner satisfying School of Architecture 
distribution requirementsp/w.? 36 semester hours credit of electives for a total 
of 132 semester hours credit that complete University distribution require- 
ments. 

2. For a Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in Architectural Studies the 
requirements are 54 hours credit chosen from architecture and nondepartmental 
listings in a manner satisfying School of Architecture distribution require- 
ments plus 78 semester hours credit of electives for a total of 132 semester 
hours credit that complete university distribution requirements. 

3. For a Bachelor of Architecture degree the requirements are: completion of 
a B. A. degree with a major in architecture (see 1 above); completion of a two- 
semester Preceptorship (30 semester hours credit); and completion of two 
studios and four lecture-seminar courses (32 semester hours credit). 

B. A. students have two options in their choice of a preprofessional major during 
the third and fourth years: 

1 . The architecture major requires two years of advanced studio courses and 
additional professional requirements that permit reasonable elective free- 
dom. This curriculum serves the needs of students who anticipate profes- 
sional studies at an advanced level and who wish to have the alternatives of 
doing so through either the Bachelor of Architecture at Rice or various first 
professional master's degrees at Rice or other institutions. 



189 

2. The architectural studies major requires advanced work combining archi- 
tectural studies with other fields during the third and fourth year. It is focused 
on an approved, preprofessional theme for interdisciplinary studies chosen 
by the individual and approved by an adviser. Application to this program 
must be made during the second year of studies. Reduced architectural 
course requirements encourage the pursuit of a double major with another 
, department. . . .. ■ . 

Upon satisfactory completion of the B. A. degree with either above major, students 
may apply during the senior year for admission to the appropriate advanced profes- 
sional degree programs. 

Complimentary programs at Rice span the gap between school and practice: the 
preceptorship program, the visiting lecturer series, and the visiting critic series. The 
preceptorship program is designed to balance classroom studio learning with profes- 
sional practice. Qualified students who have been admitted to the Bachelor of 
Architecture degree program work for an entire year with outstanding architects 
throughout the world who are designated by the school as preceptors. The timing of 
preceptorship service varies according to the level of design and technical proficiency 
reached during the B.A. program. For those admitted to the Bachelor of Architecture, 
the preceptorship occurs immediately on the receipt of the B.A. 

Notes 

1. History of Art 205. 206 are required in the first two years and will be 
scheduled where history of art electives are noted. History of Art 345, 346 are 
required for a major in architecture. 

2. Electives must satisfy School of Architecture distribution requirements in 
addition to general University requirements. 

3. Studio courses (Architecture 201 , 202: 30 1 , 302; and 401 , 402) which carry 
six semester hours each semester in the sophomore, junior, and senior years 

' count toward graduation as the equivalent of one course per semester in the 

sophomore year and as two courses per semester in the junior and senior 
years. 

Graduate Programs. The School of Architecture offers the degrees of Master of 
Architecture and Master of Architecture in Urban Design. Within the two degree 
programs, varied areas of interest are open to students. 

An advanced building design curriculum is the basis for the Master of Architec- 
ture degree program. This program is designed to provide the student an individual 
course of study with a wide choice of special project, research, and internship 
opportunities both within and outside the School of Architecture. 

Graduate studies are open to candidates who hold the degree of Bachelor of 
Architecture, Bachelor of Arts with a major in architecture, or Bachelor of Arts in other 
disciplines. Candidates with Bachelor of Architecture degrees take an average of three 
semesters to complete the Masters degree requirements. Those with Bachelor of Arts 
in Architecture are required to complete four semesters. 

The graduate program has three major areas of emphasis: Architectural Design 
with particular interest in history, theory and practice. Urban Design w here the concern 
is the emerging form of the American city. The last is an essentially research area in 
computer visualization which uses the resources of the Rice Advanced Visualization 
Lab (RAVL). RAVL is a university-wide resource housed in the School of Architec- 
ture involved in both research and teaching in the most advanced aspect of computer 
visualization. 



190 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Qualifying Graduate Program. Those with degrees in other disciplines enter 
what at Rice is titled the Qualifying Graduate Program. This is normally a seven- 
semester program leading to the Master of Architecture degree. The first four 
semesters consist of special studio offerings plus selected seminar and lecture courses. 
The last three semesters are spent in the regular graduate programs. 

All candidates for a master's degree must complete a written or a design thesis. 

Doctor of Architecture. Admission to the Doctor of Architecture program 
requires a master's degree in architecture. A student entering with a master's degree 
normally takes one and one-half years of course work before the qualifying examina- 
tion. Candidates should be prepared for advanced analytic and creative work in their 
specialized field. Such preparation may include foreign languages, statistics, or a 
computer language. This requirement is established individually when the student is 
admitted. 

After successful completion of all required course work students may apply for the 
qualifying examination. At this time, students must submit an outline of their research 
program for the doctoral dissertation. This dissertation must represent an original 
contribution to knowledge in the field of architecture. The completion of the disserta- 
tion and the passing of the final oral examination required for the doctorate in 
architecture take a minimum of one year. 



Architecture Courses 

101,F PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE I (2-6 4) 

Visual studies of restricted dimensions, explorations using simple tools and materials to develop 

an awareness of the environment. Requisite for architecture majors. Limited enrollment. 

Staff 

102,S PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE I (2 6-4) 

A development of communication of formal information from further investigation of visual 
structures and their order. Requisite for architecture majors. By permission of instructor only. 

Staff- 

132,F CHANGING PERSPECTIVES OF ARCHITECTURE (2 2) 

Introductory tutorial. Reading, field trips, and observation of current events and public affairs 
to understand the values, institutions, and nature of environmental changes relating to future role 
and practice of architecture. 

Staff 

132,S CHANGING PERSPECTIVES OF ARCHITECTURE (2 2) 

Introductory tutorial. Reading, field trips, and observation of current events and public affairs 
to understand the values, institutions, and nature of environmental changes relating to future role 
and practice of architecture. 

Staff 

134,S INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURAL THEORY (2-0-2) 

An introduction to the major texts and theories of architecture, conducted as an adjunct to the 

Freshman Design Studio. It is open to non-majors by permission of the instructor. 

Sherman, W. 

201,F PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE H (3 9-6) 

Introduction to concepts of beginning architectural design. Manipulation of visual structure to 
render formal and operational information. Design process as problem solving with emphasis 
on conscious method. Requisite for architecture majors. 

Casbarian, J. 



202,S PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE 11(3 9 6) T ' j^A 

See Arch 201. — ;■- 

Casharian. J. 

213,F STRUCTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS I (3 3) 

Introduction to characteristics of structural & construction systems in architectural technology. 
Lab experiments are combined with lectures on systems, methods & their historical development. 

Staff 

214,S STRUCTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS II (3 3) 

Application of materials & construction (wood, masonary, concrete & steel). Case studies & field 
trips. 

Staff 

301,F PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE HI (2 12 6) 

Intermediate level design problems with emphasis on building technology, programming and 
formal design. Requisite for preprofessional major in architecture. Prerequisite: Arch 201 and 
202. 

Wittenberg, G. 

302,S SELECTED ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEMS I (2 12 6) 

Variety of intermediate level problems for developing comprehensive experience in design 
methods and processes. Requisite for preprofessional major in architecture. Prerequisite: Arch 
201,202, 301. 

Staff 

308,S ARCHITECTURE FOR NON-ARCHITECTS (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Designed to increase awareness of architectural issues through site visits and comparative 

building studies, guest architects, design problems, lectures, reading, and discussion. Impact of 

architecture on its users and its relation to institutions that produce it. Enrollment by permission 

of instructor. 

- '< ■ Casbarian, J. 

311,F HOUSTON ARCHITECTURE (3 0-3) 

A series of illustrated lectures and walking tours that describe and analyze the architecture of 

Houston from the city's founding in 1836 to the present. 

Fox, S. 

315,F STRUCTURAL AND CONSTRUCTION SYSTEMS III (3-0 3) 
Application of principles of analysis to construction of steel & concrete framed structures. 
Continuation of Arch 213,214. Prerequisite: Arch 213, 214. 

Stajf 

316,S BUILDING CLIMATOLOGY (3 0-3) 

An introduction to the thermal performance of buildings. Course is divided into 2 parts: Building 

Climatology and Air Conditioning Systems. 

Wittenberg, G. 

325,F THEORY AND MODERNISM (3 0-3 ) 

Four parts: first, the "early modems" including Durand, Laugier, Ledoux. Boullee, Blondel, 
etc. Second, a brief introduction to the concept of modernity in the history of Western Thought. 
Third, an examination of the formulation and use of "modernism" as a consistent & rigorous 
term. Fourth, the readings from the canonical texts and buildings of "modern architecture."' 

McKee.E. 



192 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

336,F INTRODUCTION TO URBAN ISSUES (3-0-3) 

Major issues and problems confronting metropolitan centers; emphasis on 1 2 physical and built 
environment. Visiting lecturers on transportation, housing, education, minority problems, new 
communities, physical development and redevelopment. Course is open to all students. 

Reiner, M. 

343,S CITIES AND HISTORY (3-0-3) 

Historical survey of the city from Sumer to the Barogue capitals. 

Ingersoll, R. 

r 

344,S CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN (3-0-3) 

A seminar in which normative relationship between the construction and aesthetic of an object 
is explored and challenged. The premise of the course is that the way things are made can be 
one credible point of departure for the architectural design process. 

Parsons, S. 

345,F NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS (3-0-3) 

An overview of issues on natural resource consumption and environmental impact pertinent to 

urban design activities. Also offered as Envi 445. 

Blackburn, J. 

353,F PHOTOGRAPHY FOR ARCHITECTS (3-0-3) 

Exploration of a variety of photographic techniques for architectural research, design, and 

presentation. Enrollment limited. 

White. F. 

401,F PRINCIPLES OF ARCHITECTURE IV (12-2-6) v^Tyu^aA 
Upper level architectural design problems with an emphasis on program definition in a social 
context, site planning and building organization. Required for preprofessional major in architec- 
ture. Prerequisite: Arch 301, 302. 

Sherman, Wj- 

402,S SELECTED ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEMS H (2-12-6) 
See Arch 302. 

Staff 

412,S ADVANCED DESIGN OF STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS (3-0-3) 
Advanced course in structural design. Topics include factors controlling structural design of 
buildings, floor systems, building systems, facade treatments, long span structures, pneumatic 
and cable structures, and new structural systems and materials. Case studies will also be 
conducted. Prerequisite: Arch 213,214,315, or equivalent. 

Colaco. J., Ford, W. 

414,S HOUSTON RESEARCH PROJECT (3-0 3) 

Through examination of the work of a single architect cultural issues are identified and explored. 

Fox, S. 

415,F/S ARCHITECTURAL THEORY AND CRITICISM (3-0 3) 
Seminar dealing with landmark texts in architectural theory and criticism. 

Sherman, W. 

418,F LE CORBUSIER/MODERN ARCHITECTURE (3-0 3) 

Examine fundamental issues of modernism in architecture emerging from both European & 

American sources. Systematic analysis of the works & writings of major 20th - century 

architects. 

Ingersoll. R. 



Z^..: jJT. .: . i.ci^.' -O 193' 

420,F/S HISTORY OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGY (3 3) 

Survey of the history building technology from ancient times to the present. Lectures cover 
theory, methods & practical applications. : J ^. ^ ,^, j^o .»- . ■ . . ..: 

. ■ I. ■•„ -i^^r.^ ■ .,-.1 Miio/: '.y, Wittenberg, G. 

422,F INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER GRAPHICS 

The first course in a series of computing courses in architecture. As such, its primary focus will 
be on developing core skills that will .serve students in utilizing the ever increasing computer 
facilities in the School of Architecture. 

Bavinger. B. 

423,F/S PROFESSIONALISM AND MANAGEMENT IN ARCHITEC- 
TURAL PRACTICE (3 0-3) - 

Introductory survey of professional practice in architecture. - '-' ' "■ ,'':.r-t, 

Staff 

424,S COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN (3 3) 

Advanced computer graphic techniques using CAD in architecture as a design and presentation 
medium. Prerequisite: Arch 422 or 622 or permission of instructor. 

Bavinger, B. 



434,S INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN (3-0-3) 

435,F COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE (3 3) 

Continuation of 434 with emphasis on use of advanced software, 3-D, etc. 



Staff 



Staff 



436,S COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN (3 3) 

Advanced computer graphic techniques using CAD in architecture as a design and presentation 
medium. 

DeLaura, L. 

437,F COMPUTER PROJECTS IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN 

DESIGN (3-0-3) 
Individual projects in the application of computer technology to architectural programming, 
planning, and urban design, graphic display, and problem analysis. ,^ 

'' ' Bavinger. B. 

438,S COMPUTER PROJECTS IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN DESIGN 

(3-0-3) 
Theory and practice of computer-aided design for application to architecture, urban design and 
planning, including instruction in special programming techniques, graphic display and data 
base management. Prerequisite: Arch 437, 637 or permission of instructor. 

- ' . ',.r?' /; .-; .. Bavinger, B. 

461,F/S SPECIAL PROJECTS (Credit variable) 

Independent research or design arranged in consultation with a faculty member. Subject to 

approval of faculty adviser and director. Very limited enrollment. 

Casbarian, J. 

500,F/S PRECEPTORSHIP PROGRAM (0 15) '^' 

Requisite for admission to graduate studies in architecture for all recipients of Rice B. A. degrees 
in preprofessional or area majors. Student completes nine to twelve months of full-time 
internship under guidance of an appointed preceptor. 

Casbarian. J . 



194 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

501,F QUALIFYING GRADUATE WORKSHOP I (10 15 13) 

Requisite for admission to graduate profesional program options in architecture or urban design 
for students with nonarchitectural bachelor's degree. Lectures, seminars, laboratories, and 
design studio projects adjusted to individual needs. Prerequisite: determined by the Graduate 
Affairs Committee with the School of Architecture. 

—k t-vr lAOiT Staff 

502,S QUALIFYING GRADUATE WORKSHOP H (5-15-10) 
See Arch 501. 

Staff 

503,F QUALIFYING GRADUATE WORKSHOP HI (5 15-10) 

Design studio to follow Arch 50 1 , 502. Preparation for entering studios in the regular graduate 

programs in architecture and urban design in the following semester. 

504,S QUALIFYING GRADUATE WORKSHOP IV (5 15 10) 

See Arch 503. 



Staff 



Staff 



514,S BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AND STRUCTURES I (3-0-3) 
A course in structures for students in the Qualifying Graduate Program. Topics include: structure 
in architecture; forces and equilibrium; structural materials; the behavior, analysis, and design 
of structural elements and their connections. 

Staff 

Si5,F BUILDING TECHNOLOGY AND STRUCTURES II (3-0-3) 
A second course in structures for students in the Qualifying Graduate Program. Topics include: 
additional topics in the behavior, analysis, and design of structural elements; synthesis of 
structural elements into structural systems; integration of structural systems with other building 
systems. Prerequisite: Arch 514. 

V. ". i :t? i . \^\ iiU- V A . ;? '-.s! Staff 

516,S BUILDING CLIMATOLOGY (3-0-3) 
See Arch 316. 

541,F ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE (3-0 3) 

A survey of the development reappraisal and transformation of architectural ideals in the period 

since 1945. 

Pope. A. i^ 

542,S ISSUES IN CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURE (3 3) 

See Arch 541. 



544,S CONSTRUCTION AND DESIGN (3-0-3) 
See Arch 344. 



Pope, A. 



Parsons, S. 



600,F QUALIFYING GRADUATE PRACTICAL INTERNSHIP (3-0 3) 
Practical work experience for students who have completed at least four semesters in the 
Qualifying Graduate Program prior to their entrance into the regular Master of Architecture 
studio sequence. Permission of instructor required. Very limited enrollment. 

Todd, A. 

V nv>'.AVi«N7.v> "> 



195 

600,S QUALIFYING GRADUATE PROGRAM INTERNSHIP (Credit variable) 
Practical work experience for students who have completed at least four semesters in the 
Qualifying Graduate Program prior to their entrance into the regular Master of Architecture 
studio sequence. Permission of instructor required. Verv limited enrollment. 

Todd. A. 

601,F INVESTMENT BUILDING DESIGN STUDIO (5-15-10) 

Emphasis on abstract thought and design capabilities relevant to systematic processes of 

designing specific buildings and facilities. Prerequisite: Arch 500; or Arch 501- 504. 

Cannady, W. 

602,S ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEMS (5 15 10) 

Emphasis on abstract thought and design capabilities relevant to systematic processes of 
designing specific buildings and facilities. Prerequisite: Arch 500 or Arch 501- 504. 

Visiting Critics 

603,F URBAN DESIGN WORKSHOP I (5 15 10) 

Introductory studio in urban design w ith an emphasis on exploration of social and environmental 
forces shaping urban form, as well as the representation of urban design ideas. The workshop 
is conducted as a sequence of analytical and design exercises. Requisite for M. Arch. Urban 
Design degree. Prerequisite: Arch 50 1 -504 or Arch 500. 

Staff 

604,S URBAN DESIGN WORKSHOP II (5 1 5 1 0) 

Developing abstract thought, applied design and planning capabilities to total urban systems, 
large-scale developments, or other broad environmental action. Requisite for M. Arch. Urban 
Design degree. Prerequisite: Arch 603. 

Visiting Critic 

609,S ARCHITECTURE FOR NON-ARCHITECTS (3 3) 

Classroom teaching under the supervision of the instructor. For elective credit only. 

Casharian. J . 

611,F HOUSTON ARCHITECTURE (3 3) 

See Arch 311. 

Fox, S. 

612,S ADVANCED DESIGN-STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS (3 3) 

See Arch 412. 

Colaco, J.. Ford. W. 

614,S HOUSTON RESEARCH PROJECT (3 3) 

See Arch 414. 

Fo.x. S. 

615,F/S ARCHITECTURAL THEORY AND CRITICISM (3 3) 

Seminar dealing with landmark texts in architectural theory and criticism. See Arch 415 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Sherman. W. 



618,F LE CORBUSIER/MODERN ARCHITECTURE (3 3) 

Same as Arch. 418. 



620,F HISTORY OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGY (3 3) 

Same as Arch 420. 



IngersoU. R. 



Wittenberg. G. 



1 96 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

620,S HISTORY OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGY (3-0-3) 
Same as Arch 420. 

Staff 

622,F INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER GRAPHICS (3-0-3) 

See Arch 422. 

Bavin f^er. B. 

624,S COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN (3-0 3) 
See Arch 424. 

Bavinger, B. 

625,F THEORY AND MODERNISM (3 0-3) 

See Arch 325. 

. I'.i .; 1 .sc-:;" !-• l!-- '•■>IKa([;..; :■( vcMCT. McKee.E. 

628,S HISTORY IN ARCHITECTURE (3 3) 

A seminar on the discourse of history in and around architecture and its impact on architectural 
ideas. 

McKee. E. 

635,F COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN IN ARCHITECTURE (3 0-3) 

Special projects for advanced students in computer applications. (Same as Arch 435.) 15 

Prerequisite: permision of instructor. 

..v;.N..;..- Staff 

635,S COMPUTER PROJECTS IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN 

DESIGN (3-0-3) 
Special projects for advanced students in computer applications. (Same as Arch 435.) Prereq- 
uisite: permision of instructor. 

J i> . .,«..-. I.. Bavinger. B., DeLaura, L. 

636,F INTRODUCTION TO URBAN ISSUES (3 3) ^. i^r^xa ir»u 

See Arch 336. 

Reiner, M. 

636,S COMPUTER AIDED DESIGN (3-0 3) 
See Arch 336. 

' .n M .. Y . ,jt;v I DeLaura. L. 

637,F COMPUTER PROJECTS IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN 

DESIGN (3-0-3) 
See Arch 437. '"■ 

Bavinger, B., DeLaura, L. 

638,S COMPUTER PROJECTS IN ARCHITECTURE AND URBAN 

DESIGN (3-0-3) 
See Arch 438. 

Bavinger, B. 

643,S THE HISTORY OF THE CITY (3 3) 

See Arch 343. 

Ingersoll, R 

645,F NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FACTORS (3 3) 

See Arch 345. 

Blackburn. J. 



197 

665,F GRADUATE SEMINAR - ARCHITECTLRAL DESIGN (3 3) 

Seminars structured around topics dealing with design theory, with special emphasis on 
participation bv visiting critics and professors. 

Stajf 

666,S GRADUATE SEMINAR - ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN (3 3 ) 

Same as Arch 665. 

' ' ' * ' Visiting Critics 

700,F/S PRACTICUM(3 3) 

Full-time internship service in approved local offices under interdisciplinary supervision. 
Emphasis on "real world" design, planning, or research experiences. Special tuition. May be 
taken in anv semester or in summer. 

- . c.;^-J . ■ . ■ Staff 

.,.;^jvf • .:., . ■ j 

701,F/S THESIS RESEARCH (3-0-3) !• , 

Staff 

702,F/S THESIS (0-10-10) 

711(sectionl),F/S SPECIAL PROJECTS (Credit variable.) 

Independent research or design arranged in consultation with a faculty member subject to 

approval of the student's faculty adviser and director. 

Chairman. Graduate Comm. 

71 1( section 2),F/S THESIS PREPARATION (10 1) 

714,F/S INDEPENDENT DESIGN PROJECTS (Credit variable ) 

Chairman. Graduate Cumm. 

800,F/S GRADUATE RESEARCH (Credit variable ) 

Chairman. Graduate Comm 



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198 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Art and Art History 



Professor Basilios Poulos, Chair 

Professors Camfleld, Havens (on leave Spring 1993) and Winningham 

Associate Professors Boterf, Broker, 

Huberman, G. Smith, Widrig (on leave 1992-93) and Wilson 

Assistant Professors Manca, Mersereau, Sparagana 

Lecturer Dobbins 

Visiting Assistant Professor Lichtenstein 

^^^^f Visiting Lecturer McEvilley 

Playwright-in-Residence Brenda Dubay 
Artist-in-Residence Mark Mahosky ''^ 

• • Degrees Offered: B.A., B.F.A.. M.A. 

The Department of Art and Art History offers courses in three distinct disciplines: 
the history of art, studio art (painting, drawing, sculpture, etc.), and film and 
photography. Majors may elect to concentrate their study in any of these areas of 
specialization. 

Undergraduate Program. A minimum of 38 semester hours is required for the 
full major, including at least 1 1 semester hours in the history of art and nine semester 
hours selected from studio, film, or photography. Double majors must take a minimum 
of 32 semester hours, including at least three courses in both the creative arts and the 
history of art. All majors must complete the two semesters of the introductory survey. 
History of Art 205 and 206. For ail majors at least 50 percent of the required number 
of courses must be at the 300- or 400-level, of which more than 50 percent must be 
taken at Rice. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must also 
satisfy all the University requirements for the B.A. degree. See Degree Requirements 
and Majors, pages 68-90. 

A reading knowledge of French, German, or Italian is strongly recommended for 
all majors, especially those who intend to take 300- or 400-level courses in the history 
of art. 

Students interested in further guidance in planning the Bachelor of Arts degree 
with a major in art and art history should consult departmental faculty advisers. 

Bachelor of Fine Arts Program. The Bachelor of Fine Arts program consists of 
a fifth year of intensive study in the creative arts to be taken after a student has obtained 
a B.A. degree in art at Rice or its equivalent at another university. Candidates 
possessing a B.A. degree with a major in a field other than art may in exceptional cases 
be admitted to the program. Special fifth-year courses are available to the B.F.A. 
candidate only, in addition to advanced courses normally offered by the department. 
Satisfactory completion of a total of 30 semester hours in approved courses or the 
equivalent in approved major electives at the 300-, 400-, or 500-level is required for 
the B.F.A. degree. 

Admission to the program is determined by the Committee on Examinations and 
Standing on recommendation of the Bachelor of Fine Arts Committee in the Depart- 
ment. For further information about application forms, deadlines, admission stan- 
dards, and the like, write to the chairman of the Department of Art and Art History. 



199 

Graduate Program. Qualified students are eligible to apply for the graduate 
program leading to a degree of Master of Arts in art history with an option in classical 
archaeology. Areas of concentration in art history are those in the western tradition of 
European and American Art. Graduate work is also possible in Asian Studies. 

Graduate fellowships and scholarships are awarded on the basis of scholarly 
achievement and available funds. Fellowships consist of a stipend and a waiver of 
tuition; scholarships provide only a waiver of tuition. Graduate students as part of their 
training may be expected to render some service as research assistants, tutorial 
instructors, or curatorial assistants in the Sewall Art Gallery. 

Entering students must pass a reading examination in either French or German. 
In classical archaeology, students must pass a reading examination in one of the 
following languages: French, German, Italian, Greek, or Latin. Other languages may 
be required depending on the course of studies chosen by the student. Upon entrance, 
students may be required to take an examination to be used as a guide in determining 
their programs. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Complete with high standing a minimum of 30 hours of graduate course work 
to include a 3-hour course in art historical concepts, history, and methods of 
research; a 9-hour thesis in the second year; and 1 8 hours of lecture, seminar, 
and reading courses. For students in classical archaeology, 6 hours must be 
in archaeological field experience applied to specific research in addition to 
the above requirements. 

2. Pass satisfactorily a comprehensive examination in the second year. 

Sewall Art Gallery 

Stella Dobbins, Director 
Sewall Art Gallery, located on the ground floor of Sewall Hall, functions as an 
extension of the teaching activities in the Department of Art and Art History, but is also 
oriented to the larger university and Houston community. The gallery selectively 
collects art works which are used for instruction, research, loan, and exhibitions. Four 
to six exhibitions are mounted during the academic year, focusing on historical and 
contemporary presentations of painting, sculpture, and graphic, video, and perfor- 
mance arts. The gallery is staffed by a director and professional coordinator. Students 
enrolled in the Rice Museum intern course gain experience in museum registration 
methods, exhibition techniques, research, and other aspects of museum work. Second 
semester juniors, seniors, or graduate students interested in museum experience may 
also apply for the Museum Internship, offered in cooperation with local museums (see 
History of Art 496). 



History of Art and Architecture 

History of Art Courses 

205,F INTRODUCTION - HISTORY OF ART (4 4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Paleolithic period to the fourteenth 

century. An additional hour of tutorial per week will be assigned during the first week. 

Mersereau. R 



200 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

206,S INTRODUCTION - HISTORY OF ART (4-0-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

A survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. 
An additional hour of tutorial per week will be assigned during the first week. Hart 205 strongly 
recommended. 

Camfield. W. 
V. -■ ::■■ .. ■: r :::. 
209 INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN ART (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

A survey of the art of Asia from the Neolithic period to the present. 

Wilson. R. 

218,S HISTORY OF FILM (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Classic films from both silent and sound eras. Griffith, Eisenstein, Chaplin, Stroheim, Sternberg, 
Renoir, Renais, Godard, Bergman, and others. Attention to technique, theory, principles of 
criticism, relationship to art history in general. Students who have already taken Hart 2 1 5 or Hart 
216 not eligible for credit. Not offered 1992-93. 

. ;2bM lo 9315^0 9riJ 1 McEvilley, T. 

291,F SPECIAL TOPICS (Variable) 

Courses at the introductory level or special research and reading. May be used in awarding 

transfer credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Staff 

292,S SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) 

Staff 

293,F SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

Staff 

294,S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

Staff 

295,F SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) 

Staff 

296,S SPECIAL TOPICS IN FILM HISTORY (3-0-3) 

A changing set of topics. Will focus attention on themes such as auteur theory, directoral 
signature, film and semiotics, film and social control, film and revolution, film and Christianity, 
surealist film, film and the other arts, etc. 

McEvilley. T. 

305,F GREEK ART AND ARCHEOLOGY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1 .2 

The Bronze Age; tangible remains of Greek culture from its beginning to the end of the Archaic 
period. Not offered 1992-93. Mersereau, /?.. 

306,S GREEK ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Development from Early Classical through Hellenistic periods. Not offered 1992-93. 

Mersereau, R.. 



I 'CL-ai iiilcin Ol r^l\ 



201 

307,F ETRUSCAN AND EARLY ROMAN ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Art, architecture and civilization in Italy from Prehistoric times through the Etruscans and the 
early Roman Republic. 

Staff 

308,S ROMAN ART AND ARCHAEOLOGY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

The painting, sculpture, and architecture of ancient Rome from roots in Etruscan art through the 
Republican and Imperial eras to the age of Constantine. 

Mersereau, R. 

309,S LATE ANTIQUE AND EARLY CHRISTIAN ART (3 0-3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

The adaptation of Late Antique art and architecture to Christian content in the centuries following 
Constantine. 

Widrig,W. 

319,S GOTHIC ART (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 



321,S ART AND THE MIND (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Selected topics in art history, criticism, esthetics, philosophy and the psychology of art. Previous 
art history courses desirable but not required. 

McEvilley. T. 

345,F RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ARCH (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Renaissance architecture considered as a conscious break with medieval practice: its stylistic and 
theoretical development, primarily in Italy, during the fifteenth, sixteenth, and seventeenth 
centuries. 

Widrig. W. 

346,S 19TH-20TH CENTURY ARCH.HISTORY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

The origins of modem architecture in rival modes of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; the 
new architecture of Richardson, Sulllivan, and Wright; the Internationa! Style of Gropius, Le 
Corbusier. and Mies to the mid-twentieth century. 

Widrig. W. 

355,F AMERICAN ART: COLONIAL TO 1900 (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Emphasis on painting and architecture, with some consideration of photography, sculpture, and 
decorative arts. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

356,S TWENTIETH CENTURY AMERICAN ART (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Survey of painting, sculpture, photography, and architecture in the United States from 1 900 to 
mid-century. Not offered 1992-93. 

Camfield. W. 



202 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

361,F ART OF CHINA (3 0-3) - « * *' 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Chinese painting, sculpture, and decorative arts with special consideration of recent archaeologi- 
cal finds. Prerequisite: Hart 209 or permission of instructor. 

Wilson. R. 

365,S ARTS OF JAPAN (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

From pre-Buddhist Japanese art to the impact of Chinese and Korean culture and the emergence 
of indigenous Japanese expression in the arts and architecture. Prerequisite: Hart 209 or 
permission of the instructor. 

Wilson. R. 
JOfTi^.. 
375,F ART OF NORTHERN RENAISSANCE 

Manca, J. 

411,S EARLY RENAISSANCE ART IN ITALY (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE CATEGORY 1.2 

Art and Architecture from Giotto to Botticelli, with an emphasis on painting and sculpture in the. 
fifteenth century. •». 

■■ I ' ■' • • "• ' ' Manca. J . 

412,S THE HIGH RENAISSANCE AND MANNERISM IN ITALY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE CATEGORY 1.2 

A study of the High Renaissance, with an emphasis on its leading masters: Leonardo. Raphael, 
Bramante, Michelangelo, and Titian. The course will include a study of Mannerism, the stylish 
art produced after the first quarter of the sixteenth century. f 

Manca. J. 

415,F ITALIAN RENAISSANCE ART (3 3) 

Painting, sculpture, and architecture from Giotto to Titian. The major stylistic changes from the 
Proto-Renaissance to Mannerism, with discussion of the social and intellectual context in which 
art of this period developed. Not offered 1992-93. 

Manca. J. 

417,S MASTERS OF THE BAROQUE ERA (3 3) 

A study of the works of the greatest painters and sculptors in Europe during the Baroque period, 
including Rembrandt, Rubens, Caravaggio, Poussin, Claude, and Velazquez. Not offered 1 990- 
91. 

Manca. J. 

419,F THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

The art and architecture of the Age of Enlightenment, including Rococo, Neoclassicism, and early 
Romanticism. Not offered 1992-93. j 

Staff 

461,S NINETEENTH-CENTURY ART (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Major developments in painting and sculpture from late eighteenth-century Neoclassicism and 
Romanticism through Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. Brief consideration of 
architecture, photoiiraphy, and decorative arts. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

463,F TRENDS IN CONTEMPORARY ART (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Consideration of trends in the painting and sculpture of America and Europe from Abstract 
Expressionism to the present. Emphasis on American Art and criticistn. Prerequisite: Hart 475 
or permission of instructor. Not offered 1992-93. 

Camficld. W. 



::i;;'- ■: / - i. ^ - 203 

475,F EUROPEAN 20TH CENTURY ART (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Consideration of major developments in painting and sculpture from the 1880s to the 1940s: 
Impressionism and Post-Impressionism through Expressionism, Cubism, Abstraction, Dada, 
and Surrealism. Brief consideration of architecture and photography. 

Camfield. W. 

480,F HISTORIOGRAPHY, INTERPRETATION & THEORY OF ART 

(3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Survey of important approaches to the study of art from antiquity to the present with emphasis 
on concepts of the history of art, art theory and criticism since the late 19th century. 

Lichtenstein, T. 

482,S BUDDHISM: ART AND FAITH (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Buddhist art (writing, painting, sculpture, architecture, crafts) from the 3rd century B.C. to the 
16th century A.D. Some background in Asian culture helpful but not required. 

Wilson, R. 

483,F ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD WORK AND RESEARCH (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Field work and research applied to specific archaeological problems. 

■:.-■'■■■ ^ ■• Widrig. W. 

484,S ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD WORK AND RESEARCH (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 
See Hart 483. 

Widrig. W. 

489,S LEONARDO AND MICHELANGELO (3-0 3) 

The art and thought of the two greatest geniuses of the Italian Renaissance. 

Manca. J . 

491,F SPECIAL TOPICS: THE CITY OF ATHENS (3 3) 

. ., , , . • Mersereau. R. 

492,S SPECIAL TOPICS: DADA v 

A comparative and critical study concentrated on five major artists of the 20th century: Matisse, 
Picasso, Mondrian. Duchamp, and Max Ernst. 

* •' "■ ' ■ Camfield. W 

495,F MUSEUM INTERN PROGRAM (Credit variable) 

Prerequisite: permission of msiructor. 

Dobbins. S. 

496,S MUSEUM INTERN PROGRAM (Credit variable) 
See Hart 495. Prerequisite: permision of instructor. 

Dobbins. S. 



204 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

497,F SENIOR THESIS ( I 1 ) . i^nrr^r ,0 Am^a 

Thesis written under the direction of a member of the facuhy. Limited to senior art majors. 
Prerequisite: permission of faculty. 

rTtUfXa -HV»lJ.^»VO"'^ •' ,r.jiiv»ir,cj.*jl»i» iow ■ u4>u ■■■ Staff 

•1 noi]ci3bi<'no'jlti;T8 .m^ 
498,S SENIOR THESIS (10 1) 

'-'"'"'V: ..... :i«S513™..YHn - s,aff 

499,F INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 3) 

Dobbins. S.' 

500,F/S METHODS AND HISTORY OF ART HISTORY (3 3) 

Graduate level. See Hart 480. ,.,„ ^,^^ 

il/A IMA-.M^I CamfieUi.W. 

545,F GRADUATE SEMINAR-RENAISSANCE AND BAROQUE ARCHI- 
TECTURE 

Consideration of theoretical issues involved in the development of the Renaissance-Baroque 
styles. Individual project assignments. Prerequisite: Hart 345 or equivalent. Not offered 1992- 
93. 

Widriii.W.. 

546,S GRADUATE SEMINAR-19TH AND 20TH CENTURY ARCHITEC- 
TURE 

Consideration of special issues related to the several movements of modern architecture. 
Individual project assignments. Prerequisite: Hart 346 or equivalent. Not offered 1992-93. 

575,F TOPICS IN MODERN ART (3 3) 



Cornfield, W. 



583,F ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD WORK AND RESEARCH (3 3) 



Graduate level. See Hart 483,484. 



^HT :23HOT JAUa 



Widri^. W. 



584,S ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD WORK AND RESEARCH (3 3) 

See Hart 483. y^^j^Q .gQiqoT AAVJ ^>- 

- ' jltUnsonoj^bui;; iBaiJiTjbntsviu !!. vV' J A 

585,F INDEPENDENT READING (3-0-3)''3 '''^ ^"'^ '^^^'^'"'"'^ •"'"^"°^'' '""''''' 

Camfield. W. 

586,S INDEPENDENT READING (3-0-3) ,,,,,,„,) ^« ,,0,,,^ :ii„ 

Staff 

591,F MASTER OF ARTS THESIS (Credit variable) . .-■ :/ 1 ^, rr .ot 

Graduate level courses or special research and reading. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Camfield. W. 

592,F/S MASTER OF ARTS THESIS (Credit variable) 

Camfield. W. 

594,F SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) '.^J'^O^; 

Staff 



C 



594,S SPECIAL TOPICS: (3-0-3) 



595,F SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) 



596,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 



597,F MUSEUM INTERN PROGRAM (Credit variable) 

See Hart 495. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



598,S MUSEUM INTERNSHIP (Credit vanable) 
See Hart 496. 71 Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



800,F/S THESIS AND RESEARCH (Credit variable) 



205 

.' Stajf 

Staff 

Staff 

Dobbins. S. 

Dobbins, S. 
Camfield. W. 



Studio Art, Film and Piiotography 



Arts Courses 



101,F DESIGN I (0-6-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Principles of two and three-dimensional design problems exploring individual creative solutions 
in mixed media. Arch 101 accepted as equivalent. Not offered 1992-93. 

Smith, G. 

205,F PHOTOGRAPHY I (0 6 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Exploration of the basic materials and processes of the photographic medium; viewing, analysis, 
and discussion of the medium's history and current trends. 

Winningham, G. 

206,S PHOTOGRAPHY II (0 6 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Second semester photography. Continuation of Arts 205. 



Winningham. G. 



216,S 35MM PHOTOGRAPHY (0 6 3 ) 
* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 



225,F/S DRAWING I ( 6 3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Introduction to the problems of drawing using various media (pencil, charcoal, pen-and-ink, 
pastel). 

Staff' 

291,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN DESIGN (Variable) 

Problems at the introductory level in creative art with individual instruction and criticism. May 
be used in awarding transfer credit. 

Staff 



206 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

292,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN DRAWING (Variable) 
* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 



293,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN DRAWING (Variable) 
294,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN STUDIO ART (Variable) 
295,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS-PHOTOGRAPHY (Variable.) 



Stajf 
Staff 
Staff 

Staff 



296,S SPECIAL PROBLEMS-FILM & VIDEOTAPE MAKING (Variable ) 

Huberman, B. 

301,F PAINTING I (0 6 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Problems in painting, both traditional and experimental, in various opaque media. Prerequisite: 
Arts 225 or permission of instructor. 

■ '•'■ • ' ' '^ ;*- • "■^•- Mahosky.M. 

302,S PAINTING I (0-6-3) , 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 ll,i.,j,lA,0Jmi^<5 ^ 

See Arts 301. "■ ■ ' ' ' '" ' 

Mahosky, M. 

305,F PHOTOGRAPHY in (3-3-3) 

Advanced problems in photography. Emphasis on independent pursuit of projects submitted by 
the students. 

Staff 



306,S PHOTOGRAPHY IV (3 3 3) 

Continuance of Arts 305. 



311,F PRINTMAKING I (0-6 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Etching in black and white, color, and monoprint techniques. 



Winningham, G. 



Broker, K. 



312,S PRINTMAKING II (0-6 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Etching, including advanced color methods; engraving; and history of etching. 

i, Broker. K. 

313,F LITHOGRAPHY I (0 6 3) 

Stone lithography in black and white. 

r Broker, K. 

320,S PRINTMAKING: MONOTYPE (0 6 3) 

Introduction to Monotype. Exploration of Black and White and Color Monotype Printing. 
Prerequisite: Drawing I and permission of instructor. ( 

325,F LIFE DRAWING (0 6 3) flf^uq lAll.iq? > 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 <aw/n .i*\i^.i-ir. 

Drawing from the model in various media. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Mahosky, M. 



207 

326,S LIFE DRAWING (0 6 3) ;q f< ?,, . 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 
See Arts 325. 

/ -..'-', . - ' ,. '. , -■•■- . Mahosky, M. 

327,F/S FILM AND VIDEOTAPE MAKING I (0-5-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

A study of the expressive possibilities of the media. Synchronous sound, using super-eight 
millimeter film, plus video tape. 

Huberman, B. 

328,F/S FILM AND VIDEOTAPE MAKING I (0-5 3) 

One major film project by the class employing 1 6 mm film and synchronous sound equipment. 

Huberman, B. 

329,F FILM FORM (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Viewing, analysis, and discussion of modem and classic films. Not offered 1992-93. 

Huberman, B. 

337,S COLOR DRAWING (0 6 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Introduction to color using still lifes and employing various media (pastel and watercolor). 
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 

Poulos, B. 

345,F COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Fundamental techniques of color photography, including special problems in color camera work, 
color negative and transparency processing, and color printing. Prerequisite: Arts 205, 206. 

Winningham, G. 

346,S COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY H (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 
Continuance of Arts 345. 



Winningham, G. 



365,F SCULPTURE I (0 6 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Sculpture in wood, metal welding, and other sculptural media. 

366,S SCULPTURE I (0 6 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 
See Arts 365. 



Smith, G. 



391,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN DRAWING (Variable.) 

Problems in creative art with individual instruction and criticism. May be used in awarding 

transfer credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Stajf 

392,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS-LIFE DRAWING (Variable.) 

Stajf 

393,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PAINTING (Variable ) 

Staff 

394,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS-PRINTMAKING (Variable ) 

Broker, K. 



208 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

395,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS-PHOTOGRAPHY (Variable.) 



' ^'^^^inningham 



396,F SPECIAL PROBLEMS-FILM AND VIDEOTAPE (Variable.) 

See Arts 39 1 . _ ^ ,,^ , , .,^, ,. , 

-,r-?.-0) I 0/IL4/ Huberman, B. 

397,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN SCULPTURE (Variable.) 

Smith, G. 

420,F/S ADVANCED DRAWING (0 6 3) ,j ^^^ 

^ . Broker, K. 

423,F/S PAINTING ON PAPER (0-6-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Oil paint, oil stick, collage, and various contemporary mixed media may be employed. 
Enrollment limited to 15. Prerequisite: Drawing I or Arts 101. , - 

>^^up«ipi4^. Boterf,C. 

427,F FILM AND VIDEOTAPE MAKING H (15-3) 

One major film project by each student, using either video or 16 mm film, y ,. ;-■ ; , , ^ 

'fiuberman, B. 

■ ... lOlOO Oj ft' : . 

428,S FILM AND VIDEOTAPE MAKING H (1-5-3) "^ ^'"'^^'^"^ .^u...,...^ 
See Arts 427. 

,r (A r% Yjjor/qgiQ'iroH*' Huberman, B. 

432,S FILM GENRE: THE WESTERN (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

The essential American film experience spanning all the years of U.S. cinema. Focusing on the 
Western, the course concerns itself with the mythic function of this film genre. 

Huberman, B. 

443,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN DESIGN (Variable ) 

Smith, G. 

445,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN DRAWING (Variable.) -™' 

Advanced problems in creative art with individual instruction and criticism. May be used in 
awarding transfer credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. |. ■, i:.:,ri-^ i, . - r •■ ,^ 

-■' ' Staff 

446,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN DRAWING (Variable.) 

Staff 

447,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN LIFE DRAWING (Variable.) 

)3*18 < Staff 

448,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN LIFE DRAWING (Variable.) 

Staff 

449,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PRINTMAKING (Variable.) 

Broker, K. 

450,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PRINTMAKING (Variable.) )3*I8 2\i,f^ 

Staff 

451,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PAINTING (Variable.) j/\i ij 

Poulos, B. 



- J- r 209 

452,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN PAINTING (Variable.) 

Poulous, B. 

453,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS-PHOTOGRAPHY (Variable.) 

Staff 

454,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS-PHOTOGRAPHY (Variable.) 

Staff 

455,F SPECIAL PROBLEMS-FILM AND VIDEOTAPE (Variable ) 

Huherman. B. 

456,F SPECIAL PROBLEMS-FILM AND VIDEOTAPE (Variable.) 
See Arts 445. 

Huberman, B. 



457,F SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN SCULPTURE (Variable.) 

458,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN SCULPTURE (Variable ) 

465,F/S SCULPTURE II (0-6 3) 

Advanced problems in various sculptural media. Prerequisite: Arts 365, 366. 

466,S/F SCULPTURE II (0 6 3) 



Smith, G. 
Smith, G. 

Smith. G. 
Smith, G 



475,F ADVANCED PAINTING (0 6 3) 

Advanced problems in painting. Emphasis on independent development and participation in 
class critiques. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Poulos, B. 

476,S ADVANCED PAINTING (0-6-3) 

See Arts 475. 

.,._:', Poulos, B. 

501,F STUDIO I: PAINTING (0-6 3) 

Individual work in the studio arts, film, or photography under the direction of one or more staff 

members. Restricted to B.F.A. degree candidates. 

Staff 

502,S STUDIO I: PAINTING (0 6 3) 

See Arts 501. 

... ^f^ff 

503,F STUDIO I: SCULPTURE (0 6 3) 

See Arts 501. :.-;,;:.., ■ -; 

Smith. G. 

504,S STUDIO I: SCULPTURE (0 6 3) 

See Arts 501. 

Staff 

505,F STUDIO I: DRAWING (0 6 3) 

See Arts 501. 

Staff 



2 1 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

506,S STUDIO I: DRAWING (0-6-3) 
See Arts 501. 



507,F STUDIO I: LIFE DRAWING (0 6-3) 

See Arts 501. 

508,S STUDIO I: LIFE DRAWING (0-6-3) 

SeeArts501. , ^> ... . --.^ :. . ™ 



509,F STUDIO I: DESIGN (0-6-3) 
See Arts 501. 



510,S STUDIO I: DESIGN (0-6-3) 
See Arts 501. 



511,F STUDIO I: PRINTMAKING (0-6-3) 
See Arts 501. 



512,S STUDIO I: PRINTMAKING (0-6 3) 
See Arts 501. 



513,F STUDIO I: PHOTOGRAPHY (0-6-3) 
See Arts 501. 

..."fib VI 

514,S STUDIO I: PHOTOGRAPHY (0-6 3) 
See Arts 501. , , 



515,F STUDIO I: FILMMAKING (0-6-3) 
See Arts 501. 



516,S STUDIO I: FILMMAKING (0-6-3) 
See Arts 501. 

520,F STUDIO II: PAINTING (0 1 2-6) 

The same as Arts 501-516 with increased credit hours. 



'JM^ <■ 



jaoaqjAi 



l^^c^^iH JiUJJMt 



'^r 



HS JA^ 



M ?!l<Oii»iV Lit dj'lik^iCJtti^ is 



v£-d-o) II saui^ JH^ 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Winningham, G. 



Staff 



Huberman, B. 



T-TT7 



Staff 



Staff 



521,S STUDIO II: PAINTING (0-12 6) 
See Arts 520. 



522,F STUDIO H: SCULPTURE (0-12 6) 

See Arts 520. 



' .lJ^«T^4l^^yIOiaT?- ^'"-^ 



Smith, G. 



'tVn. 



•»•» ;;\ij4r\ i ,^%(i!«4. 



211 



523,S STUDIO II: SCULPTURE (0-12-6) 

See Arts 520. 



Smith, G. 



524,F STUDIO II: DRAWING (0-12-6) 

See Arts 520. 



525,S STUDIO II: DRAWING (0 12 6) 

See Arts 520. 



530,F STUDIO II: PRINTMAKING (0-12-6) 
See Arts 520. 



531,S STUDIO II: PRINTMAKING (0-12-6) 

See Arts 520. 



532,F STUDIO II: PHOTOGRAPHY (0 12 6) 

See Arts 520. 



533,S STUDIO H: PHOTOGRAPHY (0-12 6) 

See Arts 520. 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



Staff 



534,F STUDIO II: FILMMAKING (0 1 2 6) 

See Arts 533. 



535,S STUDIO H: FILMMAKING (0 12 6) 

See Arts 520. 



546,F STUDIO III: PHOTOGRAPHY (0 18 9) 

See Arts 540. 



547,S STUDIO HI: PHOTOGRAPHY (0 18 9) 

See Arts 540. 



548,F STUDIO III: FILMMAKING (0 1 8 9) 

See Arts 540. 



Huherman, B. 



Staff 



Winniiigham. G. 



Staff 



Huherman. B. 



549,S STUDIO HI: FILMMAKING (0 1 8 9) 

See Arts 540. 



Staff 



2 1 2 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Theater Courses "^-S: i -0) 3mJTH JU38 -.H OWU ' 

227,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3 0-3) 

Topics in theater production, history, or literature tailored to the individual student. Prerequisite: 

permission of instructor. 

Havens. N. 

228,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3 0-3) ^ ^,..,„.„^ „^.^., 

I-O) 0/lIWAHG :U Oia J ,/^^^„^ ^ 

.(. 

229,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3 3) 

SeeThea227. ^ id£\-0, ^/lAJ^MTAmH .11 C Havens. N. 

301,F ACTING I (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Development of the actor's technique through exercises in body work, concentration, creative 
imagination, sensory perception, and improvisation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Havens, N. 

302,S ACTING II (3-0-3) TOH<I :U OiaaXg 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Script analysis, characterization, work on acting roles. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Havens, N. 
rJSA«OOTOH*!:UOiaU 

430,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3-0-3) 

Advanced topics in theater production, history, or literature. Prerequisite: permission of 

instructor. 

• : Havens. N. 

43LF/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3 0-3) t>/lviAr/J/ JH :n O 

Havens. N. 

432,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS (3-0 3) ,y^^^^ UMJn M OUT. i ^ 

See Thea 430. " ' ' ' ;^,r - . 

Havens. N. 



■„ '\. , : . .,; 




'O-^l-O^ V 


roHS[:nic 


i^-r: ! -0) '-' - 


^9 III oiao 



{? 8r (n ovTW/MMjn till (' 



^^-81-0) t>/' 



' ' '■• '"■ ''-■■^■- 213 

Asian Studies 



Professors Smith, Tyler, von der Mehden 

Associate Professors Klein, Traweek, Wilson 

Adjunct Professor Mitchell 

Instructors Chen, Sato, Yang, Zhang 

Degree Offered: B.A. 

Asian Studies is an interdisciplinary major that explores the complex interaction 
between political, social, religious and other spheres of human life in Asia. Emphasis 
is placed on the diversity and achievements of Asian civilizations as well as how an 
understanding of Asia may shed new light on the Western traditions. The major is built 
around courses in the humanities and social science divisions and a team taught 
interdisciplinary core course. Introduction to Asian Civilizations. 

Requirements: The undergraduate Asian Studies major will consist of thirty 
hours or more of course work. All majors must take the course. Humanities 211, and 
nine additional courses drawn from at least three of the departments offering courses 
in Asian Studies. At least six of these courses must be chosen from 300 level or above, 
and no more than four semesters of Asian languages may be counted towards the 
major. 

One or more independent reading courses taught by Asian Studies faculty in these 
departments may be counted towards the major, although any changes in the require- 
ments for the major must be approved by the Asian Studies Committee. 

Majors are required to take at least one year of an Asian language. They may 
explore opportunities beyond the offerings in Chinese. Japanese. Sanskrit. Korean and 
Tibetan on this campus. 

Courses: 



Art and Art History 

209 INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN ART ( 3-0-3 ) 

Wilson, R. 
361 ARTS OF CHINA (3 3) 

Wilson, R. 

365 ARTS OF JAPAN (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1992-93. 

Wilson. R. 

482 BUDDHISM: ART AND FAITH (3 0-3) 

Not offered 1992-93 

Wilson. R. 



2 1 4 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Anthropology ^^ib'-^Y't nr>; 



353 CULTURES OF INDIA (3-0 3) 

Not offered 1991-92. 

Tyler, S. 

355 CULTURAL STUDIES OF JAPAN (3-0-3) 

Traweek, S. 

History -A o Vi'^i'i^o '^•^■t?-' 

250/450 CHINESE CULTURE * -r.^^^ n^..iivyi->,H-ii[u na ■' 

'■i\'y wjiAi) unii ?x«.n■ili^^ At. Smith, R. 

341 EARLY CHINESE HISTORY (3-0 3) 
Not offered 1992-93. 

Smith, R. 

342 MODERN CHINESE HISTORY (3-0 3) 

Smith. R. 

343 CONTEMPORARY CHINA (3-0-3) 

'v to .'i9J??ir!5i TUO! a Smith, R. 

352 COMPARATIVE MODERNIZATION OF CHINA AND JAPAN (3-0 3 ) 
Not offered 1992-93. 

Smith. R. I 



Humanities i 

ni> J .-All I 

21 1 INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN CIVILIZATIONS (3 3) 

Klein, A., Smith, R., Wilson R. 



Linguistics and Semiotics 

Linguistics Courses 



. r w .1 , n> ^ / .r.*A V » /OlTD jaOfll/l Q^ 



440 THE CHINESE NOVEL (3 3) 

Not offered 1992-93. (^_.^,,-- ^ ^^-^JH^ ^^O 



Chen, L. 



443 TOPICS IN CHINESE LINGUISTICS (3 3) 

vc-O-D'^A Chen,L. 

Chinese Courses 

201 ELEMENTARY CHINESE (3 1-4) VUtMlAf 



202 ELEMENTARY CHINESE (3 1 4) 



Chen, L. 
Chen, L. 



301 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE (3 14) 

302 INTERMEDIATE CHINESE (3-1-4) 

401 CHINESE READING AND WRITING (3 0-3 ) 

402 CHINESE READING AND WRITING (3-0-3) 

Japanese Courses -■'"' 

101 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE (3 1 4) 

102 ELEMENTARY JAPANESE (3 1 -4) 

201 INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE (3 3) 

202 INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE (3-0-3) 

301 ADVANCED JAPANESE READING (3 3) 

302 ADVANCED JAPANESE READING (3 0-3) 

Korean Courses 

101 ELEMENTARY KOREAN (3-0-3) 

102 ELEMENTARY KOREAN (3-0-3) 

201 INTERMEDIATE KOREAN (3 0-3) 

202 INTERMEDIATE KOREAN (3-0-3) 

Sanskrit Courses 

301 INTRODUCTION TO SANSKRIT (3 3) 



215 

Chen. L. 

Chen, L. 
Zhang. J. 
Zhang. J. 

Sato. H. 
Sato, H. 
Sato. H. 
Sato. H. 
Sato. H. 
Sato, H. 

Yang. I. 
Yang. I. 
Yang. I. 
Yang. I. 



Mitchell. E. 



216 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

302 INTRODUCTION TO SANSKRIT (3-0-3) H3 3T* 

Mitchell. E. 

- .^ Political Science 

351 POLITICS OF SOUTHEAST ASIA (3-0-3) i)/ja/ ^ " ^^'=»V^»^'^ ?' 

V ';uui\\ von der Mehden. F. 

353 POLITICS OF CHINA AND JAPAN (3-0 3) OWQy 

\'o/j der Mehden, F. 

460 SEMINAR IN COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT (3-0-3 ) 

von der Mehden, F. 

^4AlV^ . - . 

'^ ^" ' ' - Religious studies 

ASiAlYHAl t 

322 INTRODUCTION TO BUDDHISM (3-0-3 ) 

Klein. A. 
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325 BUDDHISM AND THE FEMALE (3-0 3) 
Not offered 1992-1993 

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470 BUDDHIST WISDOM TEXTS AND INTRODUCTION TO CLASSICAL 
TIBETAN (3-0-3) „ .. r 

vi Klein, A. 

471 BUDDHIST MEDITATION THEORY: WOMEN, A GENDERED / 
PERSPECTIVE (3-0-3) 

Klein. A. 
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Biochemistry and Cell Biology 



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The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 



Professor K.S. Matthews, Chair 

Professors Beckingham, Bennett, Campbell, Glantz, Olson, Palmer, G.N. Phillips, 

Rudolph, Schroepfer, and Stewart 

Assistant Professors Braam, Gomer, Gustin, King and Stern 

Instructor Cooper 

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 

The Wiess School of Natural Sciences ■ 

Professor P. A. Harcombe, Chair "' 

Professors Fisher, Philpott, Sass, Subtelny, and Ward ' ';* ' ' 
Associate Professor Strassmann ■' ' 

Assistant Professor Queller 
., ^ Adjunct Professors Cameron, Turner 
Huxley Fellows Choudhary and Evans 
Lecturers/Laboratory Coordinators Caprette, Johnson ,„,,, 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. :;;"',^J,r *^o". I '' '"^ • "j:-- 



Undergraduate Program. The Departments of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 
and Ecology & Evolutionary Biology offer a broad range of courses in the biosciences: 
animal behavior, animal biology, biochemistry, biophysics, cell biology, develop- 
mental biology, ecology, endocrinology, evolutionary biology, genetics, immunol- 
ogy, microbiology, molecular biology, neurobiology, plant biology, and advanced 
courses in these and related areas. B.A. students may elect a major in biology or 
biochemistry and select courses from this range of topics. 

The Biosciences curriculum was reorganized in 1989. Students who entered Rice 
before the Fall semester of 1 989 have the option of satisfying the requirements in place 
at the time that they entered or of following the curriculum below. They should consult 
the General Announcements from previous years for statements of requirements and 
rules covering the transition from the old to the new curriculum. Students who entered 
in the Fall semester of 1989 or subsequently must follow the new curriculum as stated 
below. 



il1,?)f' 



2 1 8 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Biosciences Undergraduate Program t 

All Biosciences majors must complete the following courses: 

Mathematics 101, 102, 211; Chemistry 101, 102, 105, 211, 212, 213, 214; 
Physics 125, 126; Biosciences 201, 202, 301, 302; Biosciences lab courses 
^ 211, 212, 213, 311, and any two of the following: Bios 312, 313, 314, 315, 
3 16, or 3 17, or Stat 305. Math 1 1 1 and 112 may be substituted for Math 101; 
Chem 111,112 may be substituted for Chem 101, 102; Phys 101, 102 o"^ 
132 may be substituted for Phys 125, 126. 

Biochemistry majors must also take: Bios 352 {or Chem 311, 312); Bios 48 1 
or 482; two additional Biosciences courses listed as Group A (see course 
listings for designation as Group A or B); an additional course, for 3 or more 
credits, at the 200 level or higher in Mathematics, Physics, Computer 
Science, or Mathematical Sciences; and an additional advanced course, for 
3 or more credits, in either Chemistry or Biosciences Group A. One semester 
of Bios 401 or 402 may be counted as one of the courses from Group A, 
provided that the faculty supervisor is from the Department of Biochemistry 
& Cell Biology. The recommended courses for those taking a limited number 
of Group A courses are Bios 341, 344, 482. 

Biology majors must also take: two Biosciences Courses from Group A and 
one Biosciences course from Group B; three additional Biosciences courses 
from Groups A and/or B. It is recommended, particularly for those planning 
research careers in cell or molecular biology, that Bios 352 be chosen as one 
of these courses. For those planning research careers in ecology or evolution- 
ary biology, a statistics course is recommended. One semester of Bios 401 
or 402 may be counted as one of the courses from Group A ( if the faculty 

'.'-: supervisor is from the Department of Biochemistry & Cell biology ) or from 
Group B (if the faculty supervisor is from the Department of Ecology & 

■ ! Evolutioary Biology). The recommended courses for those taking a limited 

number of Group A courses are Bios 341, 344, and 352. 

It is recommended that the lOO-level Mathematics and Chemistry courses be 
taken in the freshman year; that the lOO-level Physics courses and Bios 201 , 
202 be taken in either the freshman or the sophomore year; and that Chem 
21 1, 212, 213, 214 and Bios 211, 212, 213 be taken in the sophomore year. 
1);'^;; Those with a weak background in Chemistry should complete Chem 101, 
102 before taking Bios 201 , 202. Others are urged to take Bios 201 , 202 as 
freshmen, to permit earlier access to advanced level Bios courses. Physics 
125 and 126 are the preferred Physics courses for Biosciences majors. 
However, Physics 101, 102, 132 may be taken instead by those wishing to 
preserve the option ofmajoring in a subject for which Phys 101, 102, and 132 
are required. 

An undergraduate major in biosciences must have 48 semester hours in courses 
numbered 300 or higher to obtain a Bachelor of Arts degree. 



- 219 

Students must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer 
than 60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of 
at least 129 semester hours (128 if the Phys 101, 102, 132 option is chosen; 132 if the 
Math 111, 112 option is chosen). 

Undergraduate majors are encouraged but not required to pursue independent 
supervised research in Bios 401 and 402. Concurrent registration in Bios 41 1/412 and 
a thesis are required. 

Coherent Minor. Students seeking a coherent minor in Biological Sciences are 
advised to take either Bios 122, 201 , and 202 or Bios 201 , 202 and either Bios 329 or 
336. 



Accelerated Rice B.A./Ph.D. Program in Biochemistry & Cell 

Biology 

Qualified undergraduate students at Rice can apply to enroll in the Biochemistry 
& Cell Biology graduate program in their senior year. The course requirements for 
graduate studies are therefore completed at the same time as the upper-level under- 
graduate degree requirements; laboratory research performed as part of the under- 
graduate thesis project can serve as the initial phases of the Ph.D. thesis work. As a 
result, the graduate careers of these students will be accelerated by at least one full 
year, and, in principle, such students should be able to obtain their Ph.D. degree 
approximately 3 years after obtaining their B.A. degree. 

Criteria for selection include academic performance (GPA > 3.3). GRE scores, 
motivation, previous research experience, and personal qualities. Selection is made 
by a special committee including several faculty, the Chair of Biochemistry and Cell 
Biology, the Director of the Biosciences and Bioengineering Institute, and the Dean 
of Natural Sciences. 

Mechanics of the Program 

The program requires the completion of two and a half years (or their equivalent) 
of undergraduate studies at Rice before a student can be considered for enrollment in 
the accelerated Ph.D. program. To continue in the program, the following require- 
ments must be fulfilled; ( 1 ) The student must take the GRE before receiving the B.A. 
degree and receive scores greater than 80% in the Analytical and Quantitative Tests. 
(2) Students must also maintain a B average in all courses in their senior year, and the 
usual graduate requirements will apply for continucation in the program. 



220 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Graduate Program in Biochemistry & Cell Biology 

General 

Admission for graduate study in the Department of Biochemistry & Cell Biology 
requires: ( 1 ) a bachelor's degree in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, or the equiva- 
lent; and (2) demonstrated quality and motivation as indicated by the student's 
previous academic record. Graduate Record Examination scores, and recommenda- 
tions. Although the Department offers an M.A. degree, only on rare occasions will a 
student who does not intend to pursue the Ph.D. degree be admitted to the graduate 
program. 

The advanced degree requirements given on the following pages are those 
established by the Department of Biochemistry & Cell Biology and are above and 
beyond the general requirements of Rice University for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. 
Students should be familiar with the general University regulations for graduate 
students which are listed in the Rice University General Announcements. Any 
changes in these policies and/or regulations will be brought to your attention by the 
Office of Graduate Studies and/or the Department of Biochemistry & Cell Biology. 

A. Doctor of Philosophy Degree Program in Biochemistry & Cell Biology. 

Most of the formal course studies will be completed in the first year of residence 
so as to allow the student to commence thesis research at the end of the second semester 
of residence. During the first year all graduate students will be advised by the Graduate 
Advisory Committee (current composition: Olson, Phillips and Gomer). This commit- 
tee will determine the formal course program to be pursued by each student during the 
first year in residence. All students will be required to complete the following courses 
( unless equivalent educational experience has been obtained previously ): 

Introductory Biochemistry (lecture) 

Introductory Biochemistry (lecture) 

Laboratory for Experimental Biosciences (laboratory) 

Graduate Seminar in Biochemistry (first and second 

Introduction to Research -> -^fiJ ?5iiup3-r mfiisoiq o 
Molecular Biology and Genetics (lecture) 
Graduate Seminar in Biochemistry 
Physical Chemistry for the Biosciences (lecture) 

Students will be responsible for the content of these course programs in their 
Admission to Candidacy Examination (see below). 

In addition to these courses, students will be required to take a minimum of two 
400-level Bioscience courses in fields which are fundamental to their graduate 
education. These requirements will be determined by the Graduate Advisory Commit- 
tee. There will be an evaluation of previous course studies, and any deficiencies must 
be corrected, usually in the first year. Once the student selects a thesis advisor, the 
individual faculty advisor may require additional course work of a more specialized 
nature. All such additional courses must be completed prior to the Admission to 
Candidacy Examination. 



Bios 


301 






Bios 


302 






Bios 


311, 


312, 


313 


Bios 


583, 


584 




years) 








Bios 


575 






■ u Bios 


344 






'^ Bios 


581, 


582 




Bios 


352 







221 

Students will gain experience in teaching by serving as discussion leaders and 
graders in sections of undergraduate courses during their second year of residence. 

Evaluation of Progress in Graduate Study in Biochemistry & Cell Biology . 

Six procedures are used in the evaluation of a graduate student's progress: 

' 1 . At the end of each semester the faculty will review the student's performance 

^ in formal courses. In addition, at the completion of the first two semesters in 

•' residence, each student's course record, motivation, and general competence 

will be reviewed at a meeting of the entire faculty. Students are required to 

maintain at least a B (3.0) average and to demonstrate outstanding motiva- 

' ■'^" \ tion. research ability, and productivity in research to be allowed to continue 

'■ '-' in the program. In addition, a grade of C in any biosciences course will 

require that the student re-take the course. To remain in the program, a 

student must obtain a grade of B or above upon re-taking of the course. 

■ 2. Continual review of research progress by the thesis research advisor. 

3. A yearly research progress review by the three members of the student's 
Research Progress Review Committee (see below). 

" 4. Annual presentation of research progress in Bios 581/582. All students 
register in Bios 581 and Bios 582 each year. All students present their 
research at least once each year until they have submitted a completed 
doctoral thesis. The scheduling of a given student's seminar will be made by 
the faculty member responsible for this semmar program. 

5. An oral "'Admission to Candidacy Examination", completed prior to the 
>• vji'. beginning of the student's sixth semester of residence. .;. n ;,:„ 
' h-'- ■•. 

1: 

B. Master of Arts Degree Program in Biochemistry & Cell Biology. 

The course requirements for a candidate for the Master of Arts degree will be 
determined by the Graduate Advisory Committee as outlined m Part A. As in the case 
of Ph.D. candidates, all students complete (unless equivalent educational experience 
has been obtained previously ) the following courses: 

Bios 301 I ^'. ■ . Introductory Biochemistry (lecture) ' 

Bios 302 Introductory Biochemistry (lecture) 

Bios 31 1, 312. 313 Laboratory for Experimental Biosciences (laboratory) 

Bios 583. 584 Graduate Seminar in Biochemistry (first and second years) 

Bios 575 Introduction to Research 



6. Evaluation of Ph.D. thesis by thesis committee and final oral defense of 
thesis. 



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222 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Bios 344 Molecular Biology and Genetics (lecture) 

Bios 58 1 , 582 Graduate Seminar in Biochemistry 

Bios 352 Physical Chemistry for the Biosciences (lecture) 

In addition to these courses, students will be required to take a minimum of two 
400-level Bioscience courses in fields which are fundamental to their graduate 
education. These requirements will be determined by the Graduate Advisory Commit- 
tee. There will be an evaluation of previous course studies, and any deficiencies must 
be corrected, usually in the first year. Once a student selects a thesis advisor, the 
individual faculty advisor may require additional course work of a more specialized 
nature. baw^ivtn yj Iliw 

Students must achieve an overall average of B in the formal biosciences courses 
to be a candidate for the M.A. degree. The student's overall performance will be 
evaluated by the faculty as a whole after the second semester in residence. 

One progress review session will be held for M.A. students during their second 
full year of residence. This research review session will be identical in format to that 
for the Ph.D. students but, in the case of M.A. students, replaces the admission to 
candidacy examination since no other preliminary examination will be held prior to the 
final oral defense of the Master's thesis. Master of Arts degree candidates are required 
to submit a formal written thesis. The final examination will consist of a public oral 
presentation of the research work to the thesis committee members and other 
interested parties followed by a question and answer session with the thesis commit- 
tee. 



Graduate Program in Ecology & Evolutionary Biology 

The graduate program is open to qualified applicants who hold a bachelor's 
degree or equivalent. Prospective graduate students must take the Graduate Record 
Examination, including the advanced examination in biology. The entering student 
generally is expected to have a strong background in biology: in addition, completion 
of courses in physics (one year), mathematics (including calculus), chemistry (includ- 
ing organic), and biochemistry is required. The above requirements do not preclude 
admission of qualified applicants who have majored in areas other than biology. Any 
deficiencies should be made up no later than the first year of residence in graduate 
study, including the first summer. It is strongly recommended that deficiencies be 
made up during the summer preceding the first semester of residence. An examination 
is administered during the first year. Students entering with the master's degree are 
normally exempt from this examination. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts. The degree of Master of Arts 
may be obtained after the completion of 30 semester hours of graduate study, six hours 
of which must be earned by the completion and public defense of a thesis embodying 
the results of an original investigation. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. In addition to the 
general University requirements for advanced degrees (pages 1 40- 1 42), the following 
departmental requirements must also be met. 

Hj.;, v'bil ot fioii3uboi)nI ?V?, ?.olQ 



223 

1 . Three or more years of graduate study with at least two years in residence at 
Rice 

2. An original investigation worthy of publication in a scientific journal and a 
doctoral thesis as described in the General Announcements 

3. A grade average of "B" or better in courses taken in the department and 
satisfactory grades in courses taken outside the department 

4. Satisfactory performance in teaching assignments for at least two semesters 

5. Satisfactory performance on a candidacy examination administered by the 
advisory committee; this examination may be oral and/or written 

6. Public defense of the thesis 

7. Presentation of a departmental seminar on the candidate's research 

Fellowships. A limited number of graduate fellowships are available on a 
competitive basis. . / . 

Biological Sciences Curriculum 

121,F FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPTS IN BIOLOGY (3 3) 

An introduction fornon-science, non-engineering majors to specific concepts in modem biology 
from the molecular to organismal level. Topics include recombinant DNA, genetic engineering, 
AIDS, and cardiovascular disease. 

Kin^^. G.. Matthews, K . Schroepfer. G. 

201,F INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY (3-0-3) 

The first in an integrated sequence of four courses (Bios 201, 202, 301, 302). Chemistry and 
energetics, cell physiology, cell biology, organ system physiology, immunology, and plant 
physiology. Corequisite: Chem 101 or consent of instructor. 

Gitstin. M.. Philpott. C. 

202,S INTRODUCTORY BIOLOGY (3 3) 

The second in an integrated sequence of four courses (Bios 201, 202, 301, 302). Transmission 
genetics, molecular genetics, development, behavior, evolution, ecology, and diversity. 
Corequisite: Chem 102 or consent of instructor. 

Sass. R.. Subtelny, S. 

211,F INTRODUCTORY LAB MODULE IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

(1-4-1) 
Lab days will be assigned during the first week of classes. Course taught in the first half of the 
semester. Prerequisite: current or prior enrollment in Bios 201. 

Caprette. D. 

212,F/S INTRODUCTORY LAB MODULE IN CELL BIOLOGY AND 
DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (14 1) 

Taught in the second half of the semester. May be taken following Bios 21 1 in the fall or in the 
spring semster. Enrollment limited to 24/section. Prerequisite: Bios 211. 

Caprette. D 

213,F/S INTRODUCTORY LAB MODULE IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLU- 
TIONARY BIOLOGY (14 1) 

Experimental laboratory and field studies of natural history, species diversity, and animal 
behavior. Computer simulations of population genetics and dynamics. Course will begin Oct. 
19 in the fall semester and Mar. 8 in the spring semester. May be taken following Bios 2 1 1 in 
the fall or in the spring semester. Enrollment limited to 60. Prerequisite: Bios 211. 

Johnson. K. 



224 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

301,F INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (3-0-3) 

The third in an integrated sequence of four courses (Bios 201, 202, 301, 302). Structure and 
function of proteins, enzymes, and nucleic acids. Molecular Biology. Prerequisites: Chem 211, 
212, Bios 201, 202 or consent of instructor. 

Corner . /?., Olson. J. 

302,S INTRODUCTORY BIOCHEMISTRY (3-0-3) 

The final in an integrated sequence of four courses (Bios 201, 202, 301, 302). Introduction to 
metabolism, membranes, electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, general metabolism 
and regulation. Prerequisite: Bios 301 or consent of instructor. 

Palmer, C, Rudolph, F. 

310,F/S INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR UNDERGRADUATES (0 TBA credit 

variable: from 1 to 4 hours per semester) 
An independent program of study for students with previous training in the biosciences. A 
research paper is a required part of this course. This course does not count toward credit for 
a biology or biochemistry major. Prerequisite: Bios 201, 202, 3 credits of Bios lab. Requires 
permission of supervising faculty member and the departmental chair. 

Harcombe, P., Matthews, K. 

311,F LAB MODULE IN BIOCHEMISTRY (14 1) 

Introduction to biochemical laboratory techniques with an emphasis on study of proteins. 
Course taught for 1/2 semester. Prerequisite: Bios 21 1 and 212, prior or current enrollment in 
Bios 301 or permission of instructor. 

Cooper. B. 

312,S ADVANCED LAB MODULE IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 1(1-41) 
Introduction to microbiological and molecular biology techniques. Course taught for 1/2 
semester. Prerequisites: Bios 212 and current or prior enrollment in Bios 301 or permission of 
instructor. 

Bennett, G.. Corner. R. 

313,S ADVANCED LAB MODULE IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 0(141) 
Continuation of Bios 312. Course taught for 1/2 semester. Prerequisites: Bios 312 or 
permission of instructor. 

Bennett. C. Comer. R. 

314,S ADVANCED LAB MODULE IN CELL BIOLOGY AND DEVELOP- 
MENTAL BIOLOGY (14 1) 

Research-oriented studies on the regulation of early development, cell recognition, differen- 
tiation, intracellular organization and transport. Meets 2 days per week starting in March. 
Enrollment limited to 20. Prerequisites: Bios 212. Recommended: Bios 341 and/or 343. 

• T Caprette. D. 

315,S ADVANCED LAB MODULE IN PHYSIOLOGY (14 1) 

A laboratory-oriented short course in membrane, nerve, and muscle physiology. Meets 2 days 
per week for 4 weeks starting in January. Enrollment is limited to 24/section. Prerequisites: 
Bios 212 and 301. 

Caprette. D. 

316,F ADVANCED LAB MODULE IN ECOLOGY (14 1) 

Field and lab experiments in ecology. Prerequisite: Bios 213. Corequisite: Bios 325. 

Harcombe . P. 

317,S ADVANCED LAB MODULE IN BEHAVIOR (14 1) 

Field experiments in behavior. Prerequisites: Bios 213 and 321. 

Strassmann. ./. 



■ " -'-^ ■■ ■ 225 

321,F ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3-0-3) Group B. 

Evolutionary theory is used to evaluate behavioral adaptations of organisms to their environ- 
ment. Prerequisites: Bios 202 or permission of instructor. 

Strassmann, J. 

325,F ECOSYSTEM BIOLOGY (4-0-4) Group B 

Analysis of population dynamics, species interactions, plant and animal community organiza- 
tion, and ecosystem function. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202 or Junior standing in a Science/ 
Engineering major or consent of instructor. 

Evans.J..Harcomhe.P. 

329,F ANIMAL DIVERSITY (3 3) Group B 

The evolution and systematics of animals with consideration of the functional morphology, 
physiology, and behavior. Prerequisites: Bios 201 and 202. 

Fisher, F. 

334,S EVOLUTION (3-0-3) Group B. 

Principles of biological evolution. Topics include natural selection, adaptation, molecular 
evolution, formation of new species, the fossil record, biogeography, and principles of classifi- 
cation. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202 or permission of instructor. 

Queller, D. 

336,S PLANT DIVERSITY (3 3) Group B 

Analysis of the physiology, morphology, and evolution of plants in terms of adaptation to 

environment. Not offered every year. Prerequisites: Bios 201 and 202. 

Choudhary, M., Evans. J. 

341,F CELL BIOLOGY (3 3) Group A 

Molecular mechanisms of the processes common to all cells, including exposition of structure, 
function and biogenesis of all subcellular organelles. Emphasis will be on cytoplasmic events; 
molecular studies of transcription will be taught in Bios 344. Prerequisites: Bios 20 1 and 202. 
Co-requisite: Bios 301 or permission of instructors. 

Braam, J.. Gustin, M. 

343,F DEVELOPMENT (3-0-3) Group A. 

Analysis of the processes and principles of development as seen in a broad spectrum of eukaryotic 

organisms. Prerequisites: Bios 201 and 202. 

Suhtelny. S. 

344,S MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS (3-0 3) Group A 

Analysis oftransmission, function, and molecular structure ofthe genetic material. Prerequisites: 

Bios 201, 202, and 301 or consent of instructor. 

Beckingham. K.. Stewart. C. 

352,S PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY FOR THE BIOSCIENCES (3-0-3) Group A. 
Selected aspects of physical chemistry as it relates to the biosciences. including thermodynam- 
ics, reaction rate theory, quantum mechanics and atomic and molecular structure. Prerequisites: 
Chem 211.212. Phys 101, 102 , Bios 301, or permission of instructor. 

Olson. J.. Phillips. G. 

401,F UNDERGRADUATE HONORS RESEARCH (0 1 5 5 ) 

Open only to undergraduate majors with the permission of the research supervisor and chair. 
Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, 301, 302 and concurrent enrollment in Bios 41 1. Registration for 
Bios 401/402 implies a commitment to participate in research for at least 2 semesters. 

Staff 



226 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

402,S UNDERGRADUATE HONORS RESEARCH (0-15-5) JAN«T> 

See Bios 401. Concurrent enrollment in Bios 412. 

Staff 

411,F UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR (10-1) 
Discussion of current research in area under investigation. Corequisite: enrollment in Bios 401 . 

Matthews, K., Harcomhe, P. 

412,S UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR (10 1) 

See Bios 411. Corequisite: enrollment in Bios 402. 

Matthews, K., Harcomhe. P. 

421,F NEUROBIOLOGY (3-0 3) Group A. 

Cellular and molecular mechanisms of nervous system function. Emphasis on membrane and 
synaptic biophysics, sensory and motor systems, neuronal plasticity, and development. Prereq- 
uisites: Bios 201, 202, 301, 302. 

Glantz, R. 

422,S ENDOCRINE PHYSIOLOGY (3-0-3) Group A. 

Molecular and cellular mechanisms of hormone synthesis and of target cell responses; hormonal 

interactions in mammalian homeostasis. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, 301, 302. 

Campbell. W. 

423,F IMMUNOBIOLOGY (3-0-3) Group A. 

Cellular and molecular basis of immune function in mammals. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, 

301,302. 

'■■ ' '"• ' ' >■ Campbell. W. 

424,S MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY (3-0-3) Group A 
Structure and function of microorganisms with emphasis on their environmental, industrial and 
medical importance. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, 301 or consent of instructor. Corequisite: 
Bios 302 or consent of instructor. 

Bennett. G. 

442,S SPECIALIZED CELL FUNCTION (3-0 3) Group A 

The structure/function specializations seen in selected types of cells and tissues in higher 

animals. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, 301, and 302. Bios 341 and 343 are recommended as 

prerequisites. 

Philpott. C. Stdhtehiy. S. 

445,F ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS (3 3) 

Group A. 

Molecular and genetic aspects of the regulation of gene expression as seen in simple prokaryotic 
systems and the model eukaryotic systems used for studies of development. Prerequisites: Bios 
201, 202, 301, and 344 or permission of instructor. 

Stern. M.. Stewart. C. 

481,F MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS I (3 3) Group A 

Interaction of light with matter, absorption, natural and magnetically-induced optical acitivity, 

fluorescence, exafs, epr, and NMR of biomolecules. Prerequisites: Bios 352 or permission of 

instructor. 

Kin^. G.. Palmer. G. 

482,S MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS II (3 3) Group A 

X-ray diffraction and crystallography, neutron scattering, electron microscopy, theoretical 
protein dynamics, protein folding, fast kinetics, and protein engineering. Prerequisites: Bios 
301. Bios 3.52 or permission of instructor. 

Phillips. G.. Staff 



227 

541,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOL- 
OGY (3-0-3) 

Staff 

575,F INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL 
BIOLOGYd 1) 

Introduction of first-year graduate students to the research programs and laboratories of 
individual faculty members. 

Staff 

581,F GRADUATE SEMINAR IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY ( 1 

0-1) 
A discussion of selected research topics. Required of all Biochemistry and Cell Biology 
graduate students. 

Matthews, K. 

582,S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY ( 1 

0-1) 

See Bios 581. . - . _ : : " 

Matthews. K. 

583,F GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STU- 
DENTS IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY (2 2) 

Presentation of seminar on current biosciences research. 

584,S GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR FIRST AND SECOND YEAR STU- 
DENTS IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY (2 2) 

See Bios 583. • • - ■ - - • 

• . • . . - - .. ..-. - Staff 

585,F/S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY 
BIOLOGYd 0-1) 

Faculty and student presentations on current research. Required of all EEB graduate students. 

,, •- - Harcomhe.P. 

591,F/S GRADUATE TEACHING (10 1) 

Supervised instruction in teaching ecology and evolutionary biology. Prerequisite: Graduate 
standing in ecology and evolutionary biology. 

Harcomhe, P. 

61I,F RESEARCH SEMINAR (3 3) 

Discussion of mdividual laboratory research or current topics in particular areas. Corequisite: 
Bios 800 or permission of instructor. 

612,S RESEARCH SEMINAR (3 3) 

Continuation of Bios 61 1. j- 

--- - -- ^ • V- ' ■■ ' ' Staff 

621,F THESISSEMINARd 1) 

Staff 

622,S THESIS SEMINAR (1-0 1) 

800,F/S GRADUATE RESEARCH (Variable) 

Staff 



228 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Chemical Engineering 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



' ilEWf 



fi 



I Professor C. A. Miller, Chair 



Ml ?- 



-f ) Y'30 '' Professors Akers, Armeniades, Davis, Dyson, Heliums, 

Hightower, Kobayashi, Mclntire, Robert, and Zygourakis 

Part-time Professor Hirasaki 

Adjunct Professor G, D. Fisher 

, ; Associate Professor San 

J. Y-^O l( Adjunct Associate Professors Carnahan and House 

Assistant Professors W. Chapman, Mikos, and Shanks 
42 ' S *■ I- ' 

. , *' , Adjunct Assistant Professors Hokanson and Moorhead 

Degrees OfferedB.A., B.S.. M.Ch.E.. M.S.. Ph.D. 



Undergraduate Program. The undergraduate curriculum in chemical engineer- 
ing is designed to provide a sound scientific and technical basis for further professional 
development. Concurrently, the student has the opportunity to concentrate on a 
particular technical specialty such as applied mathematics, biomedical engineering, 
biotechnology, environmental quality, kinetics and catalysis, chemical reaction engi- 
neering, engineering economics, petroleum production, solid state materials, or 
polymer science and engineering. 

In the four-year curriculum, a student may qualify for either the Bachelor of Arts 
degree or the Bachelor of Science degree. The Bachelor of Arts program is highly 
flexible and allows a student to pursue other areas of interest with or without a double 
major. The Bachelor of Science program has a higher content of required scientific and 
professional courses. On completion of either bachelor's program, a student is eligible 
to apply for a fifth year of specialized study leading to the degree of Master of Chemical 
Engineering. The undergraduate curriculum is designed so that outstanding students 
interested in careers in research and teaching may enter graduate school after either 
bachelor's degree. 

The Department of Chemical Engineering specifies 76 semester hours for the 
B.A. degree, prerequisites and laboratory courses included. In addition to these 
requirements, students must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no 
fewer than 59 semester hours outside the departmental requirements for a total of at 
least 135 semester hours. 

The B.S. degree requires 102 semester hours and is accredited by the Accredita- 
tion Board for Engineering and Technology. Students enrolled in the B.S. program 
must take: 

Chemistry 111, 112 (or 101,102). 105. 211 212. 213.214,311,312,313; 
Chemical Engineering 301, 302, 343, 390, 401. 402. 403, 404, 411, 412, 443, 
444, 470; -'* 

Mathematics 101. 102. 211.212 or equivalent honors courses; 
Mathematical Sciences 335 (or Mathematics 381); 



' ■ : : -' ■'• '-J 229 

Physics 101, 102. and 132; 

Computing requirements: four hours of Mathematical Sciences 223; 
Mechanical Engineering 21 1; 
An approved basic science course; 

Two courses selected from Electrical Engineering 241, Materials Science 301, 
r. ;.^ Civil Engineering 300, and Environmental Science and Engineering 534. 

In addition to these courses, students must satisfy the distribution requirements 
and complete sufficient courses outside the departmental requirements for a total of at 
least 135 semester hours. A specific B.A. with double majors in Chemical Engineering 
and Biochemistry is available. A new specific B.S. in Chemical Engineering plus an 
Environmental Engineering option is also offered. Both these elective options will be 
mentioned explicitly on one's transcript. 

Graduate Program. Graduate study in chemical engineering can lead to the 
Master of Chemical Engineering, the Master of Science, or the Doctor of Philosophy. 
University requirements for the professional degree M.Ch.E. are given on page 139. 
The Department requires that at least six of the courses taken must be at the advanced 
level in chemical engineering. In addition, two semesters of chemical engineering 
design, courses in process control and computer science, and an approved mathemat- 
ics course must have been taken some time in the student's curriculum. 

University requirements for the research degrees M.S. and Ph.D. are outlined on 
pages 143-146. 

Candidates for the Master of Science degree are required to complete a minimum 
of 1 8 approved semester hours with high standing. They must also submit an original 
research thesis and defend it in a public oral examination. 

Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree must demonstrate competence in 
the areas of applied mathematics, thermodynamics, transport processes, and chemical 
kinetics and reactor design by passing qualifying examinations, normally during the 
first year of study. They must also complete a minimum of 36 approved semester hours 
with high standing and submit a thesis that provides evidence of their ability to carry 
out original research in a specialized area of chemical engineering. With departmental 
approval, the course requirements may be reduced to 24 hours for students already 
having an M.S. degree. The thesis must be defended in a public oral examination. 

Prerequisites for Undergraduate Chemical Engineering 

Courses 



Course Prerequisites 

Ceng301 Math 101. 102;Chem 111. 112 (or 101. 102); 1 hr credit in Masc 223 

(MATLAB) 

Ceng 302 Ceng 301; Masc 223; corequisite Math 212 

Ceng 390 Ceng 30 1 ; Math 211,212; co-/pre-requisite Chem 311, Ceng 343 

Ceng 401 Phys 101, 102; Ceng 302; Math 211.212 

Ceng 402 Ceng 401 ' ■•' 

Ceng 403 Phys 101. 102; Math 211.212; Ceng 302. 390; co-/pre-requisite 

Mech211 

Ceng 404 Ceng 390. 401, 403, and 41 1; co-/pre-requisite Ceng 470 ;,.. , 

Ceng 411 Chem 31 1.312 ^ , ■- 

Ceng 412 Ceng 411 

Ceng 470 Ceng 390. 401; Math 21 1. 212; Phys 101 . 102 



230 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Note: With the written consent of the instructor, a student may register for a 
course without having completed the required prerequisite(s), but such consent can be 
expected only in unusual circumstances and will not carry forward. For example, if the 
instructor for Chemical Engineering 4 1 1 waives Chemistry 311 for a person, then the 
person upon completing Chemical Engineering 41 1 may not proceed to Chemical 
Engineering 412 without the consent of that instructor since Chemistry 311 is an 
implied prerequisite for Chemical Engineering 412. 



Chemical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering Courses 

301,F CHEMICAL ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS (3 3) 

Use of basic mathematical concepts, physical laws, stoichiometry, and the thermodynamic 
properties of matter to obtain material and energy balances for steady and unsteady state 
systems. Required for sophomores intending to major in chemical engineering. 

Shanks. J. 

302,S SEPARATION PROCESSES (3-3 4) 

Analysis and design of single and multistage contacting operations involving binary and 

multicomponent systems. 

Dyson, D. 

343,F CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LAB I ( 1 3 2) 

Experiments demonstrating the principles presented in Ceng 301, 302, 390. 

Chapman. W. 

390,F KINETICS AND REACTOR DESIGN (3-0 3) 

Principles and significance of chemical kinetics; procedures for evaluating kinetic parameters 
from reaction rate data; application of these methods to design and predict the performance of 
various types of ideal and nonideal chemical reactors in both homogeneous and heterogenous 
systems. ■ • -. .,^.. ~ .,..,, ..—,.. .^.. 

Hightower, J. 

401,F TRANSPORT PHENOMENA I (3-0-3) 

Fundamental principles of heat, mass, and momentum transport applied to the continuum; 

analysis of macroscopic physical systems based on the continuum equations. 

, ■ - , .- , . . Dyson. D. 

402,S TRANSPORT PHENOMENA n (3 3) 

Continuation of Ceng 40 1 . 

■>- • Heliums. J. 

403,S EQUIPMENT DESIGN (3-3 4) 

Design and economic analysis of chemical process equipment. Use of computer design 

packages in the analysis of chemical equipment. 

, ., ,,- I Davis, Jr., S. 

404,S PROCESS DESIGN (3 3 4) 

Optimal design of chemical processes using industrial economic principles. Special process 
design projects in small groups. 

Akers. W. 



. ->:- •:.. ... - •,:-.•... 231 

411,F THERMODYNAMICS I (3-0-3) ^ 

Development and application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics. . 1 1: . 

Akers.W.. Davis, Jr.. S. 

412,S THERMODYNAMICS H (3 0-3) 

Advanced treatment of chemical and physical equilibrium in multicomponent systems. Detailed 

study of nonideal solutions. 

Chapman, W. 

443,F CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LAB II (13-2) 

Experiments demonstrating transport coefficient measurement, forced and free convection 
transfer operations, and thermodynamic principles as covered in Ceng 401, 402, 411. 

Dyson, D. 

444,S CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LAB HI (13 2) 

An extension of Ceng 443. '-'■ ."' 

Dyson, D. 

470,F PROCESS DYNAMICS AND CONTROL (3-3 4) 

Modeling of dynamic processes. Response of uncontrolled systems. Transfer functions. Feed- 
back controllers; response and stability of controlled systems; frequency response. Design of 
feedback controllers. Cascade, feedforward and multivariablc control systems. Introduction to 
computer control. Students wi!! use simulators for designing feedback controllers and experi- 
ment with a laboratory computer control system. 

San, K., Zygourakis, K. 

483,F UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (Vaiiable) 

Independent investigation of a specific topic or problem in modem chemical engineering research 
under the direction of a selected faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of the department. 

Hightower, J. 

484,S UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH (Variable) 
Same as Ceng 483. 

' ■ '' ' Hightower. J. 

501,F FLUID MECHANICS AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES (3-0-3) 
Advanced study in fluid mechanics and transport processes including analytical and numerical 
approximation methods, boundary layer theory, and hydrodynamic stability. 

Heliums. ./. 

503,S CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROCESSES I: AIR POLLUTION 
CONTROL (3 3) 

Atmospheric pollutants (CO, HC, VOC, NO^, SO^, particulates). Sources of pollutants (mobile, 
stationary, natural). Removal of gaseous pollutants from effluent streams. Societal and 
economic aspects of atmospheric pollutants. Prerequisites: Math 2311, 212, Chem 112 or 
permission of instructor. 

Hightower, J., Zygourakis, K. 

504,S CHEMICAL ENGINEERING PROCESSES II (2 3 3) 

Design of chemical processes, with emphasis on the use of available process design computer 
programs. 

- '- '■ ■ Kobayashi. R. 

540,S STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS (3-0 3) 

A development of the equilibrium theory of statistical mechanics. Applications to imperfect gas 
theory and the calculation of thermodynamic properties of matter. Prerequisite: Chem 311,312, 
430; Math 211,212; Phys 201, 202 or 21 1, 212. Also offered as Chem 421. 

Robert. M. 



232 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

560,S INTERFACIAL PHENOMENA (3-0-3) T — T .- ;^/ --T/rT^TT- - : 

Interfacial Tension, Wetting and Spreading, Contact Angle Hysteresis. Interaction between 
Colloid Particles, Stability of Interfaces, Flow and Transport near Interfaces. 

Miller. C. 

571Ji^ RESERVOIR ENGINEERING (3-0-3) 

Basic reservoir engineering principles-single and two phase flow in porous media. 

Miller. C. 

580,F MATHEMATICAL MODELING IN BIOCHEMICAL ENGINEER- 
ING (2-0-2) 
Enzyme kinetics. Modeling of biological systems; lumped parameter, single cell and structured 
models. Metabolic engineering. Prerequisite: Bioc 502. 

San. K. 

582,S NMR SPECTROSCOPY IN ENGINEERING (3 3) 

Basic principles and applications of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to chemical 
engineering problems. Topics include /// \i\o NMR, imaging, NMR microscopy, 2-dimensional 
methods, solid state. Material from current literature, 
-bs^l ,^^ou^^iA isftanfiiT Shanks. J. 



584,S M.CH.E. RESEARCH PROJECT (3 3) 

Independent investigation of a specific topic or problem in modem chemical engineering research 
under the direction of a selected faculty member. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. 

Staff 

591,S HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSIS (2-0-2) }?T*iJf!^q051^aV^F 

Principles of heterogeneous catalysis, catalyst preparation, measurement and significance of 
surface physical and chemical properties, adsorption, heterogeneous kinetics, difffusion in 
porous media, catalyst poisoning and regeneration, aspects of reactor engineering, and a review 
of selected commercial catalytic reactions. Prerequisite: CENG 390 or equivalent. 

'y.dpi fiiAJU/^ilo Hightower.J. 

592,S REACTION ENGINEERING (2-0 2) 

Conservation equations, analysis and design of continuous flow stirred-tank and tubular 
reactors, multiplicity and stability of steady states, non-ideal reactors. Prerequisite: CENG 390 
or equivalent. 

.lidtilrt 'j\a\>ii\xby>\bii^ L.f!b ,x.iv...u. »^.ui ,.ii.t>..«^xi ,^^- Zygourakis. K. 

593,F POLYMER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING (3 3) 

Basic concepts in macromolecular chemistry and their application in the synthesis and chemical 
modification of polymers. Prerequisite: Chem 21 1, 212. ^c-O-C/ ovJ's > - 

■ OI^..0OV.DH.O0)zJn£Jui4v«ff'?iW^^- ^ 
'j?c2 1o lsvom35l .(liiiuJBn ,'(• 
594,S PROPERTIES OF POLYMERS (3-0-3)!!' n .ii^ri" ." .. >o ^n-^r^^ - 
Molecular organization and physical properties of polymneric materials; elastomeric. semicrys- 
talline, and glassy polymers; processing and technology of polymeric systems. Also offered as 
Msci 594. 

•4 OWIIJia-Hl^IOH: Armeniades. C. 

601,S FLUID MECHANICS AND TRANSPORT (3 3) ^ 

Advanced study in one of several areas of fluid mechanics or transport, including tensor 
analysis, continuum mechanics, rheology, and mathematical methods of special interest in 
fluid mechanics. 

Mclntire, L. 

.111. 1 ;li..^i!.J ....o.„;jj'!ii4 ij..^.n; i-j<;:!i.ij,0:<^ _■• 
.!£*> m^d^ ?.& bsia^lo 02lA .£!£ .i 



- ■™-- ,:, 233 

602,S PHYSICO-CHEMICAL HYDRODYNAMICS (3 0-3) 

Topics in hydrodynamics including areas such as waves on hquid surfaces, conventive 
diffusion in liquids, motion of drops and bubbles, and electrophoresis. 

Mel nt ire. L. 

611,F ADVANCED TOPICSTHERMODYNAMICS (3-0 3) 
An advanced treatment of the classical thermodynamics of pure and multicomponent systems. 
Topics include first and second law analysis of engineering problems, property estimation and 
prediction, mixture theories, phase and chemical equilibria, and availability analysis. 

, , . ■ - • Chapman. W. 

661,F GRADUATE SEMINAR (1-0 1) 

Mikos, A. 

662,S GRADUATE SEMINAR (1-0-1) 

Shanks, J. 

671,S RESERVOIR ENGINEERING II (3 3) 

Computational methods in reservoir engineering; application to reserves estimation, recovery 
prediction, history matching, tertiary recovery operations. 

Hirasaki, G. 

672,F APPLIED MATHEMATICS 1(3-03) 

Linear algebra and its applications. Vector spaces. Linear systems of equations; direct and 
iterative solution methods; eigenvalues and eigenvectors; systems of ordinary differential 
equations; positive defeinite matrices; applications to engineering problems. 

Zygflurakis. K.. Mikos. A. 

673,S APPLIED MATHEMATICS n (3 3) 

Mathematical analysis of convection, dispersion and reaction systems. Modeling and simula- 
tions of transport and reaction engineering problems. Material from current literature. Not 
offered every year. 

■ . . " Stajf 

(nS,S PROCESS DYNAMICS (3-0 3) 

Dynamic equations for discrete and continuous models of chemical systems; lumped parameter 
systems and state space representation and multi variable control techniques; nonlinear systems, 
linearization, and phase plane analysis; sampled data systems; digital simulation techniques. 

San, K. 

681,S BIOPROCESS ENGINEERING (2-0-2) 
Bioseparation processes, animal cell culture, bioreactor control. 

Stajf 

683,F MASTER OF SCIENCE RESEARCH AND THESIS (Variable) 

Miller. C. 

684,S MASTER OF SCIENCE RESEARCH AND THESIS (Variable) 

Miller. C. 

691,F ADVANCED REACTION ENGINEERING (2 2) 

Mathematical analysis of heterogeneous catalytic and non-catalytic reactions, design of packed 
bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors. Prerequisite: CENG 591, 592 

,. .. - . , . ..... Zygourakis. K. 



234 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

692,F ADVANCED REACTION ENGINEERING II (2-0-2) H 

Gas/liquid, liquid/liquid reactions, design of multiphase reactors, applications to bioreactors 
and immobilized enzyme reactors. Co-Prerequisite: CENG 691 

Staff 

720,S ADVANCED TOPICS (3-0-3) ^ ^^ - ^- 

Staff 

730,F ADVANCED TOPICS (3-0-3) ' ^^ J bn». 'i^tt^^ 

Biomechanics and biomaterials; structure and function of extracellular supportive tissue in 
skeletal and cardiovascular systems; design, development, and evaluation of synthetic polymers 
for structural tissue replacement. 

Armeniades, C. 

800,F/S GRADUATE RESEARCH (3 0-3) » J!A/TIMa? 

Miller. C. 



Chemistry 



The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 



Professor R.F. Cm\,Chair 

Professors Billups, Brooks, Curl, Engel, Fukuyama, Glass, Kinsey 

.,^ Margrave, Parry, Sass, Schroepfer, Smalley, and L. J. Wilson 

Adjunct Professors Harland and Hayes 

Associate Professors Ciufolini, Hutchinson, Weisman and Whitmire 

Assistant Professors D'Evelyn, Hwu, and Scuseria 

Lecturer Busby 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program, Undergraduates electing chemistry as a major are 
expected to take the following courses in their first year: Mathematics 101, 102 (or 
equivalent honors courses); Physics 101, 102 and 132; Chemistry 101 or 111, 102 or 
1 12, and 1 05 . In general, students take Chemistry 211,212,213, 2 14 and Mathematics 
211,212 (or equivalents) in the sophomore year. Physics 201 and 202, although not 
required, are recommended. The Department further requires satisfactory completion 
of the following courses: 

Junior and Senior Years 

Chemistry 3 1 1 , 3 1 2 and 3 1 3, 3 14 

Chemistry 401 and 403 

Chemistry 491, 492 or 493 (see footnote*) 

Chemistry 460 or 495 

(* at least three semester hours in not less than two-hour segments) 

Two additional courses of at least three semster hours each in advanced chemis- 
try, physics, mathematics, mathematical sciences, or biochemistry. Students may 
substitute further undergraduate research (Chemistry 491, 492, 493) for one or 
two semesters of classroom instruction. 



■ 235 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must also 
satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours 
outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 126 semester 
hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-92. 

American Chemical Society Certification. The Rice Department of Chemistry 
is on the approved list of the Committee on Professional Training of the American 
Chemical Society and as such can certify that graduates have met the appropriate 
standards. For certification, two additional advanced courses are required. Chemistry 
460 and 495 are both required; one can be counted as an advanced course. A foreign 
language, preferably German, is recommended. 

Accelerated Ph.D. Plan. Because of the high level of training provided in the 
Rice B.A. program, it is possible for certain especially qualified undergraduate 
students to be admitted to an accelerated program that could lead to the Ph.D. degree 
in about two years after completion of the B.A. program. In order to complete the work 
in this time, the student initiates research during the summer following the junior year 
and continues research by taking Chemistry 491, 492 during the senior year. The 
student may start taking cumulative examinations during the senior year and should 
be able to complete all courses and examinations before the end of the second year after 
the B.A. The student may, in favorable cases, be able to complete the thesis in this time 
as well. 

Interdepartmental Majors. An interdepartmental major in chemical physics is 
offered jointly with the Physics Department. Advice about this program should be 
obtained from both departments. Double majors with several other departments, such 
as biochemistry, materials science, physics, and mathematics are not uncommon since 
the programs have many required courses in common. 

Graduate Program. Students who have completed work equivalent to that 
required for the bachelor's degree in chemistry may be admitted to graduate standing. 
Preference is normally given to applicants who earn high scores on the Graduate 
Record Examination, including the advanced test in chemistry (see page 147). A 
minimum of two years of graduate study is required for the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. A nominal amount of undergraduate teaching is normally considered an 
integral part of the graduate program. 

Candidates for the degree of Master of Arts are required to complete six one- 
semester courses, present in a thesis the results of a program of research approved by 
the department, and pass a final oral examination. 

Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must complete for publication 
a thesis which represents a distinctly original and significant contribution to the field 
of chemistry. Candidates must further have acquired through course work and 
independent study a broad fundamental knowledge of chemistry in addition to those 
areas of the subject encompassed by their own research interests. Cumulative exami- 
nations for the Ph.D. degree are given periodically, and a final oral examination on the 
thesis is required for all candidates. 



236 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Chemistry Courses i hAmny9mi^hiFi,iinr^.: %afr.^rn'*.i(^tih -^ri» n, noijM 

101 Ji^ GENERAL CHEMISTRY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

Introduction to chemical phenomena emphasizing problems and methods in chemistry. Nor- 
mally taken with Chem 105. Either 101 or 1 1 1 may be taken as prerequisite for advanced study 
in chemistry, but only one of these two may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: high school 
chemistry. 

Hutchinson. J. 

102,S GENERAL CHEMISTRY (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

See Chem 101. Either 1 02 or 1 1 2 may be taken as prerequisite for advanced study in chemistry, 
but only one of these two may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: Chem 101 or 111. 

Whitmire. K. 

105,F/S INTRODUCTORY LAB IN QUANTITATIVE CHEMISTRY (M-2) 
Laboratory measurements of chemical composition, molecular weights, equilibnum con.stants, 
heats of reaction, optical spectra, and reaction kinetics using a variety of classical and 
instrumental methods. Normally taken with Chem 101 or 1 11, 102 or 1 12. The lab is prerequisite 
for advanced courses in chemistry. (One afternoon lab plus one lecture hour per week.) 

FIBrooks. PR.. S/Curl. R.F. 

106,S HONORS LABORATORY (0-4- 1 ) 

Independent projects in synthesis and characterization of compounds. Prerequisite: Chem 101 

or 111, and permission of instructor; coreq- Chem 105. 

■.':nu lOiW,- Wilson. L.J. 

1 1 1,F PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

An introduction to chemical phenomena emphasizing principles and theories in chemistry. 
Normally taken with Chem 105. Either 101 or 1 1 1 may be taken as prerequisite for advanced 
study in chemistry, but only one of these two may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: high school 
chemistry, physics, calculus. 
.^,^ Weisman.R. 

112,S PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

See Chem 111. Either 102 or 1 12 may be taken as prerequisite for advanced study in chemistry, 
but only one of these two may be taken for credit. Prerequisite: Chem 1 11 or permission of 
instructor. 

Margrave . J . 

211,F ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

Aliphatic and aromatic organic chemistry with emphasis on structure, bonding, and reaction 
mechanisms. Second semester: greater emphasis on the chemistry of various functional groups. 
Normally accompanied by Chem 213, 214. Chem 212 must be preceded by Chem 211. 
Prerequisite: Chem 101, 102 or 111. 112. 

Ciufolini, M . 

212,S ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 
See Chem 211. Prerequisite: Chem 211. 

Engel.P. 



:.r ' ■'■' 237 

213,F ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB (0-4 1) ^ ' > 

Synthesis, purification, and characterization of organic compounds. Experiments related to 
topics covered inChem21 1,212. Second semester includes identification of unknown organic 
compounds. (One hour lecture precedes each lab.) One lab per week. Coreq- Chem 211,212 
Prerequisite: Chem 105. 

Billups. W.E. 

214,S ORGANIC CHEMISTRY LAB (0-4-1) 

See Chem 213 Prerequisite: Chem 213. 

Parry. R. 

311,F PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3 3) 

Principles of thermodynamics, including applications to chemical equilibria, solutions, and 
electrochemistrv; kinetic theory. Prerequisite: Math 21 1. 212; Phys 101, 102: Chem 101, 102, 
or 111, 112. 

D' Evelyn, M.P. 

312,S PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (3-0 3) 

Elements of quantum chemistry, spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, kinetics; chemical 
reaction dynamics and properties of liquids, solids and macromolecules. Prerequisite: Chem 311; 
Phys 202 is recommended. 

We is man. R.B. 

313,S EXPERIMENTS IN PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (14 2) 

Experiments illustrating techniques employed in high resolution optical spectroscopy, electro- 
chemistry, calorimetry, surface area measurements, and kinetics. Lab meets alternate weeks. 
Prerequisite: Chem 105, 311; Phys 132. 

D' Evelyn. M. 

314,S ADVANCED INSTRUMENTAL LABORATORY (0 8 2) 

Principles and applications of modem instrumental methods to inorganic and physical chemis- 
try. Prerequisite: Chem 31 1 and co-requisite Chem 313. 

Busby HI. G. 

401,F ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3 3) 

Pericyclic reactions, (Woodward-Hoffman rules): reactive intermediates: rearrangements: 
sterochemistry. Chemistry of carbohydrates, aminoacids. peptides, and nucleic acids. Important 
reactions of organic chemistry and their mechanisms. 

Billups. W.E.. Parry. R. 

403,F ADVANCED ORGANIC LABORATORY (18 2) 

Covers the techniques of modem organic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 212, 213, 214. 

Owens, W.H. 

411,S SPECTRAL METHODS IN ORGANIC CHEM (3 3) 

Elucidation of organic structures by physical techniques. Interpretation of infrared, ultraviolet, 
nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectra. Prerequisite: Chem 401. 

Fukuyama, T. 

415,F CHEMICAL KINETICS AND DYNAMICS (3 3) 

Description and analysis of the rates of unimolecular, bimolecular and composite chemical 
reactions in gas and solution phases. Both macroscopic kinetics and microscopic reaction 
dynamics are covered. Prerequisite: Chem 31 1. 312. .; ■* 

Glass. G.P. 



238 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

430,F QUANTUM CHEMISTRY (3-0-3) 

Quantum mechanical principles, atomic structure and chemical bonding. Prerequisite: Chem 

312. Phys 202 is recommended. 

Scuseria, G. 

445,F PHYSICAL-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3-0-3) 

Organic reaction mechanisms, substituent and medium effects, linear free energy relations and 

acidity functions. Coreq- Chem 401. Prerequisite: Chem 311,312. 

Engel. P. 

460,S INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3-0 3) 

Survey of the periodic table; atomic and molecular structure; bonding in covalent, ionic, and 
electron deficient systems; thermochemical principles and experimental techniques for analysis, 
structure determination, and synthesis. Prerequisite: Chem 21 1, 212, 213, 214. 

Hwu, S. 

491,F RESEARCH FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

Open only to chemistry majors. Written report required. 

Brooks, PR. 

492,S RESEARCH FOR UNDERGRADUATES 

See Chem 491. 

Brooks, PR. 

495,F TRANSITION METAL CHEMISTRY (3-0-3) 

Structure, bonding, and reactivity of coordination, bioinorganic, and organometallic com- 
pounds; ligand field theory; electronic spectroscopy; magnetism; reaction mechanisms; cataly- 
sis. Chem 460 recommended. Prerequisite: Chem 311, 312. 

Whitmire, K., Wilson, L. 

515,F CHEMICAL KINETICS AND DYNAMICS 

Description and analysis of the rates of unimolecular, bimolecular, and composite chemical 
reactions in gas and solution phases. Both macroscopic kinetics and microscopic reaction 
dynamics are covered. Prerequisite: Chem 311. 312. 

,; - _;i. Glass. G. P. 

520,S CLASSICAL AND STATISTICAL THERMODYNAMICS 

A review of the principles of classical thermodynamics and an introduction to the theories and 
methods of statistical thermodynamics with applications to problems in chemistry. Prerequisite: 
Chem 3 1 1 , 3 1 2, or equivalent. 

Hutchinson, J. 

522,S STATISTICAL MECHANICS 

A development of the principles of statistical mechanics with applications to problems of 
chemical interest. Prerequisite: Chem 311,312, 520. Also offered as Ceng 540. 

Robert, M. 

530,F QUANTUM MECHANICS I 

Quantum mechanical principles, atomic structure, and chemical bonding. Prerequisite: Chem 
312. Phys 202 is recommended. 

Scuseria, G. 

53I,S QUANTUM MECHANICS II 

A development of the elements and techniques of quantum mechanics with applications to atomic 
and molecular systems. Prerequisite: Chem 430 or 530. 

Scuseria. G. 



239 

541,F SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3 0-3) 

Topics in transition metal chemistry, synthesis, photochemistry and photophysics. Offered every 

other year. Usually alternates with Chem 543. (Will not be offered in F 1992). 

Staff 

542,S SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Seminars in mechanistic and synthetic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem 561. 

Ciufolini. MA. 

543,S SPECIAL TOPICS IN ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Not offered in Spring '93. 

561,F ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3 3) 

The disconnection approach to organic synthesis. Heavy emphasis on reactions, reagents, and 
mechanisms. Prerequisite: orco-req- Chem 401. 

Fukuyama, T. 

562,S ADVANCED ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (3 3) 

Continues in the same vein as Chem 561 but with emphasis on very recent advances in 
stereoselective synthesis. 

Staff 

575,S PHYSICAL METHODS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

A survey course of research techniques used in modem inorganic chemistry. Topics covered 
will include X-ray diffraction, calorimetry, matrix isolation, mass spectrometry, magnetism, 
electrochemistry, and various spectroscopies (IR, Raman, UV-Vis, nmr, epr, XPS, EXAFS, 
and Mossbauer). Open to undergraduates by special permission only. 

Hwu. S.-J.. Margrave. J.. Whitmire. K., Wilson. L. 

590,S SURFACE CHEMISTRY 

Topics in the chemistry of solid surfaces including surface structure, surface composition and 
gas-surface interactions. (Will not be offered in Spring 93) 

Staff 

595,F SPECIAL TOPICS IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Rotation of topics include: solid-state chemistry, organometallic chemistry, bioinorganic 
chemistry, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Open to undergraduates by special permission 
only. 

Hwu. S.-J. 

600,F/S INORGANIC SEMINAR 

Selected topics in current research and literature. 

Hwu. S.-J-. Margrave. J.. Whitmire. K.. Wilson. L. 

611,F HIGH TEMPERATURE AND HIGH PRESSURE CHEMISTRY(3 3) 

The techniques for generation and measurement of high temperature and high pressures and of 
the nature of phenomena under extreme conditions. 

Margrave. J. 

630,F MOLECULAR SPECTROSCOPY AND GROUP THEORY 

Experimental and theoretical principles of the spectroscopy of simple molecules, including 
microwave, infrared, visible, ultraviolet, and Raman spectra; introduction to molecular symme- 
try and group theory. Prerequisite: Chem 53 1 . 

Smalley. R. 

800,F/S GRADUATE RESEARCH (Variable) 

Staff 



240 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Civil Engineering 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



f,.\f'.V<^^^/.i' 



Professor Nordgren, Chair 

Professors Holt, Merwin, Spanos, and Veletsos 

Associate Professor Durrani 

Assistant Professors Conte and Dakoulas 

Lecturers Gosain, Hanks, Haris and Sedlak 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S.C.E., M.C.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

The profession of civil engineering is concerned with the development, planning, 
design, construction, and operation of large facilities and systems. These include 
buildings, bridges, and other structures of various forms; transportation systems, 
water supply systems, drainage and flood control and systems for waste disposal and 
pollution control. The planning of new communities and the redevelopment of existing 
cities are also within the spectrum of civil engineering activities. 

Undergraduate Program. The professional degree is the Bachelor of Science in 
Civil Engineering. The programs leading to this degree are accredited by the Accredi- 
tation Board for Engineering and Technology. The student may choose to take a quite 
general basic program, or a more specialized option: the Environmental Engineering 
Option (offered in conjunction with the Department of Environmental Science and 
Engineering). The departmental requirements are as follows: 

Basic Program 

Mathematics 1 1 , 1 02, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, and Mathematical Sciences 223, 335 or 353, and 38 1 

or Statistics 310 
Physics 101, 102, 132, Chemistry 101, 102 
One of the following: Chemistry 21 1, Geology 101, 102, Environmental Engineering 

201, 443, Physics 201, Biosciences 201, 202 
Materials Science 301, Mechanical Engineering 200 or Electrical Engineering 241 
Civil Engineering 21 1, 251, 300, 302, 304, 305, 306, 363, 400, 403, 404, 451, 464, 

470, Environmental Engineering 403 
One of the following: Civil Engineering 530 or 540 
An approved elective at the 400 or 500 level in Civil Engineering or a closely related 

area 

Environmental Option 

Mathematics 101. 102, 21 1, 212, Mathematical Sciences 223, 335 or 353, and 381 or 

Statistics 310 
Physics 101, 102, 132, Biosciences 201 or 202, Chemistry 101, 102, 105, 21 1, 213 
One of the following: Geology 341, 352, Environmental Engineering 443, Chemistry 

212 and 214, 311 
Civil Engineering 211, 300, 302, 304, 306, 363, 403, 404, 470 
Environmental Engineering 201, 401, 403, 412 
Two or the following: Environmental Engineering 518, 530, 534, 536, 550 



241 

In addition to the departmental requirements above, students must satisfy the 
University distribution requirements (page 68-90). and must complete a total program 
of at least 134 semester hours. More information on the civil engineering program, 
including a recommended course of study by semesters and suggestions for selecting 
electives. may be obtained from the departmental office. The program of each student 
is formulated in consultation with a departmental adviser. As soon as students decide 
on an engineering major, they should consult the departmental advisers. 

A Bachelor of Arts degree with a civil engineering major is also available for 
students not interested in a professional career in civil engineering. The B.A. program 
has less technical content than the B.S.C.E. program and hence more flexibility with 
electives. It is not accredited as a professional engineering curriculum. The detailed 
curriculum may be obtained from the departmental office. This curriculum requires at 
least 124 semester hours of which no fewer than 60 must be outside of the specific 
departmental requirements. 

The Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering is a suitable terminal degree for 
students interested in a professional career, but a master's degree is highly desirable. 
The Doctor of Philosophy degree is generally required for a career in teaching or in 
research and development. 

Graduate Program. Programs of study in structural engineering and structural 
mechanics and geotechnical engineering can lead to the degrees of Master of Civil 
Engineering, Master of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy. Special attention is given 
to developing the student's interest in and ability for independent study and research 
in the M.S. and Ph.D. degree programs. 

Applicants for graduate study are generally required to have a Bachelor of Science 
in Civil Engineering, with a significant emphasis on structural engmeering. Consid- 
eration may be given to applicants with some other undergraduate degrees if they have 
adequate preparation in mathematics, mechanics, and structural analysis and design. 
Curricula such as engineering technology or construction technology do not represent 
adequate preparation. 

The requirements for a professional Master of Civil Engineering degree are 
described on page 139. University requirements for other advanced degrees are 
described on pages 143-146. Departmental requirements for the M.S. and Ph.D. 
degrees are as follows. A candidate for the Master of Science degree is required to ( 1 ) 
complete at least 24 semester hours of approved courses; (2) complete an acceptable 
thesis; and (3) pass a final oral examination on the thesis. A candidate for the degree 
of Doctor of Philosophy must satisfy the following requirements: (1; complete at least 
48 semester hours of approved courses with high standing; (2) pass a comprehensive 
preliminary examination designed to test the candidate's knowledge of the field and 
ability to think in a creative manner: (3) pass an oral qualifying examination on the 
proposed thesis research and related topics; (4) complete a thesis which shall 
constitute an original contribution to knowledge; and (5) pass a final public oral 
examination on the thesis and related topics. If the departmental faculty concludes at 
any stage of a student's doctoral program that he or she is unqualified to continue, the 
student is denied further registration. 

The research interests of the members of the civil engineering faculty lie in the 
areas of structural and foundation dynamics, including earthquake engineering and 
offshore structures, applications of probability theory to civil engineering problems, 
particularly random vibrations and structural fatigue; behavior of concrete compo- 
nents and structural systems; experimental studies of fatigue in steel structural 
assemblies; and mechanical properties of soils. 



242 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

• '• M.S. and Ph.D. students are expected to participate in the instructional activites 
of the Department as part of their educational experience. This service will not usually 
be required for more than one semester of an M.S. program or two semesters of a Ph.D. 
program, nor for more than six hours per week in any semester. 



Civil Engineering Courses 

211,F ENGINEERING MECHANICS (3-0-3) 

Equilibrium of static systems, dynamics of a particle, dynamics of particle systems, and rigid- 
body dynamics. Elements of vibrational analysis. Prerequisite: Phys 101, 102, Math 101, 102. 
Also offered as Mech 211. 

251,F PLANE SURVEYING (13-2) 
Fundamental surveying principles and techniques. 

Hanks, M. 

300,S MECHANICS OF SOLIDS (3-0-3) 

Stresses and deformations due to various loads. Study of engineering properties of materials and 

failure theories. Prerequisite: Civi 211. 

Merwin, J. 

302,S STRENGTH OF MATERIALS LABORATORY (0 3-1) 
Standard tension, compression, and torsion tests of ferrous and nonferrous metals; experimental 
techniques, behavior of structural elements. Enrollment limited, preference given to Civi majors. 

Merwin, J. 

304,S STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS I (3-0-3) 

Analysis of statically determinate structures; stability and determinacy; influence lines and 
moving loads. Calculation of deflections. Introduction to analysis of indeterminate structures. 
Prerequisite: Engi 211 and concurrent registration in Civi 300. 

Stajf 

305,F STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS H (3-0-3) 

Force and displacement methods of analysis of indeterminate structures; influence lines; energy 

methods. Limit analysis of beams and frames. Prerequisite: Civi 304. 

Staff 

306,S STEEL DESIGN (3-0-3) 

Design of steel members, connections, and assemblies. Behavior of steel members as related to 

design. Prerequisite: Civi 304. 

Holt, E. 

363,F APPLIED FLUID MECHANICS (3-0-3) 

Fluid properties, fluid statics and incompressible fluid steady flow. Energy and momentum 
equations with many applications. Similitude and dimensional analysis. Viscous fluid flow in 
pipes and pipe networks. 

Merwin, J. 

400,F MECHANICS OF SOLIDS O (3-0-3) 

Continuation of Civi 300. Additional topics include curved beams, beams on elastic foundations, 
torsion of non-circular sections, energy methods, and failure modes. Intended for undergradu- 
ates. Does not count toward graduate degree requirements in Civil Engineering. Prerequisite: Civi 
300. 

Merwin, J . 



243 

403,F REINFORCED CONCRETE DESIGN (3 3) 

Material properties, flexural strength ot rectangular and T-sections; strength design of beams, 
one-way slabs and footings; shear strength; deflections; and column design. Use of handbooks 
and computer programs for design. Prerequisite: Civi 304. 

Durrani, A. 

404,F CONCRETE LABORATORY (0 3 1 ) 

Tests of materials and reinforced concrete members. Prerequisite: Civi 403 (concurrent). 

Durrani. A. 

451,S INTRODUCTION TO TRANSPORTATION (3 3) 

Operational characteristics of transport modes, elements of transportation planning, and design 
of stationary elements. 

Sedlak. J. 

464,S HYDROLOGY AND WATERSHED ANALYSIS (3 3 4) 

Fundamentals of the hydrologic cycle, hydrography techniques, flood routing, and open channel 
flow; local watershed application and laboratory. Also offered as Envi 412. 

Bedient, P. 

470,F BASIC SOIL MECHANICS (3 3 4) 

Soil exploration, soil properties and behavior, soil classifications, hydraulics of soil moisture, 
consolidation and settlement, strength characteristics, soil stabilization, lateral earth pressure, 
slope stability, and retaining wall design. 

Dakoulas. P. 

499,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS (Variable) < 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations, special lectures, and seminars. 

Offered upon mutual agreement of faculty and student. 

Staff 

500,F ADVANCED MECHANICS OF SOLIDS I (3 3) 

General analysis of stress and infinitesimal strain, linear elastic and thermo-elastic stress-strain 
relations. Formulation and solution of boundary value problems, including torsion and flexure 
of cylinders, plane problems, flexure of plates, and selected three-dimensional problems. 
Approximate solutions by energy methods and the finite element method. Intended for graduate 
students, others by permission of instructor. 

Nordgren, R. 

501,S ADVANCED MECHANICS OF SOLIDS II (3 3) 

Analysis of the nonlinear behavior of elastic and inelastic solids with application to engineering 
materials. Nonlinear theory of rods and the stability of columns. Prerequisite: Civi 500. 

Nordgren. R. 

503,F STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS BY MATRIX METHODS (3 3) 

Flexibility and stiffness of structural elements. Compatibility and equilibrium. Force and 
displacement methods of analysis. Finite element methods. Nonlinear structures. Prerequisite: 
Civi 305 or equivalent. 

Holt. E. 

509,S DYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF OFFSHORE STRUCTURES (3 3) 

Loads on offshore structures are described on deterministic and probabilistic basis. Methods are 
examined for calculating the structural response. Specific examples involving drill strings, 
marine risers, fixed and compliant structures are given. 

Staff 



244 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

512,F ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF PROBABILITY (3-0-3) ^ 

Applications of probability theory and statistics in planning, analysis, and design of civil 
engineering systems. Probabilistic modeling of random phenomena. Occurrence models; 
extreme value distributions. Statistical inference methods. Modeling and analysis of 
uncertainties in engineering. Introduction to Bayesian statistical decision theory. Prerequi- 
sites: Masc 381 or 382. 

([-£-r Conte.J. 

513,F THEORY OF ELASTICITY (303) 

Advanced topics in the linear and nonlinear theory of elasticity. Offered irregularly. 

Staff 

515,S STRUCTURAL PLASTICITY, FATIGUE, AND FRACTURE (3-0-3) 
Problems in limit analysis and design, plastic behavior of structures, fatigue failure and brittle 
fracture of structural components. Also offered as Mech 515. 

Merwin,J. 
\ 
516,F PLATES (3-0-3) 

Introduction to theories of plates and cylindrical shells with applications to practical problems. 
Offered irregularly. 

Staff 

519,S SHELLS (3-0-3) 

Introduction to theories of shells with applications to practical problems. Offered irregularly. 

Staff 

521,F STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS I (3-0-3) 

Dynamics of force-excited discrete linear systems with applications to design. Prerequisite: 

permission of instructor for undergraduates. 

Veletsos, A. 

522,S STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS II (3-0 3) 

Dynamics of force-excited continuous linear systems and ground-excited linear and yielding 

structures. Fundamentals of earthquake engineering. Prerequisite: Civi 521. 

w.iXr'.'jiC. ii;r;-.i:^nt ^.rjiiisi; :•' ^is.'/.jii ,cni3' Veletsos. A. 

523,S PROBABILISTIC STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS (3-0 3) 
Introduction to probability theory and random processes. Dynamic analysis of linear and non- 
linear structural systems subjected to analysis of stationary and non-stationary random excita- 
tions. Reliability studies related to first excursion and fatigue failures. Applications to earthquake 
engineering, offshore engineering, and wind engineering. Prerequisites: Civi 52 1 or Mech 4 1 2 
and basic knowledge of probability theory. Also offered as Mech 523. 

Conte. J. 

524,S STRUCTURAL RELUBILITY THEORY AND APPLICATIONS (3-0^3) 
Probability theory and random processes; fundamentals of structural reliability theory. Methods 
of reliability analysis; structural component and system reliability. Reliability-based design 
codes; structural load modeling and combination for performance and safety evaluation. Seismic 
risk analysis of structural systems. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of probability theory. 

Conte. J. 

525,F STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS HI (3-0 3) 

Special topics in structural dynamics, including problems of wave propagation, response of 
structures to waves, dynamics of foundations, soil-structure and fluid-structure 
interaction. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Civi 521. 

Veletsos. A. 



245 

526,S STRUCTURAL STABILITY (3 3) 

Stability criteria. Flexural and torsional buckling of columns and frames, lateral buckling of 
beams, plate buckling. Effect of imperfections on strength. Beam-columns. Evaluation of design 
code provisions. 

Stajf 

530,F CONCRETE BUILDING DESIGN (3 3) 

Design of reinforced concrete building structures and floor slab systems. Case histories will 
be discussed. Prerequisite: Civi 403. 

Gosain. N. 

531,F BEHAVIOR OF REINFORCED CONCRETE MEMBERS (3 3) 

Moment-curvature relationship for beams and columns, biaxally loaded columns, slendemess 

effects, interaction diagrams, shear and torsion in members, shear wall-frame interaction, 

behavior under large load reversals; extensive use of microcomputers. Prerequisite: Civi 403. 

. . Durrani. A. 

532,S PRESTRESSED CONCRETE (3 0-3) 

Prestressing techniques, prestress losses, deflections, shear and torsion, analysis and design of 
members using microcomputers, composite members, continuous beams and prestressed slabs. 
Prerequisite: Civi 403. 

Durrani. A. 

540,S STEEL BUILDING DESIGN (3-0-3) 

Practical considerations from the conceptual stage to the final analysis: including design 

parameters and serviceability limitations. Prerequisite: Civi 305. 306. 403. 

Maris. A. 

570,S FOUNDATION ENGINEERING (3 0-3) 

Geotechnical engineering applications to the analysis, design, and construction of shallow and 

deep foundations and earth retaining structures. Prerequisite: Civi 470. 

Dakoulas. P. 

571,F SOIL DYNAMICS (3 3) 

Introduction to Vibrations and Wave Propagation in Elastic Media. Behavior of soil subjected 
to dynamic and cyclic loading, including field and laboratory testing. Engineering applications, 
focusing on earthquake engineering problems such as modification of ground shaking caused by 
the soil, liquefaction of sands, machine foundations, etc. 

Dakoulas. P 

699,F/S SPECIAL PROBLEMS (Variable) 

Study of selected topics including individual investigations under the direction of a member of 

the civil engineering faculty. Offered upon mutual agreement of faculty and student. 

Staff 

800,F/S RESEARCH AND THESIS (Vanable) 

Staff 



246 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Classics '^ '' ■ 



'-*^'' Associate Professors Wallace and Yunis 

Lecturer Eaker T JWfl 3T3 

Degrees Offered: B.A. in Classics (Greek and Latin), B.A. in Latin. 

Undergraduate Program. The program in Classics offers instruction in the 
languages, literature, history, and culture of ancient Greece and Rome. We offer two 
types of major: Classics, which entails the study of both ancient Greek and Latin, and 
Latin. Both majors stress the study of the literature of the classical civilizations in the 
original languages. The student who chooses one of these two majors will learn that 
the study of ancient Greek and Latin is a demanding, but rewarding discipline. For our 
majors we advise, and will try to facilitate, travel to Greece or Italy and experience on 
a dig or study at the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. Rice is now 
a supporting member of the Intercollegiate Center. 

Each year we also offer courses about various aspects of the classical civilizations 
using English translations. These courses are organized below under the rubric 
"Classical Studies". 

A major in Classics is essentia^ preparation for graduate study in Classics, ancient 
history, ancient philosophy, ancient religion (especially early Christianity), and 
ancient art history. Knowledge of Greek and Latin is useful for graduate study in 
English, the Romance languages, German, the Slavic languages, theology, European 
history, and linguistics. A Secondary Teaching Certificate in conjunction with a B.A. 
in Latin or Classics is available through the department of Education. The program in 
Classics is formally administered as part of the department of Hispanic and Classical 
Studies. Students interested in majoring in Classics or finding out more about the 
program should see Professor Yunis. 

Requirements for the Major. Students may choose a major in either Classics 
(Greek and Latin) or Latin. 

For the major in Classics, the student must take 27 semester hours (9 courses): 

1 . 21 semester hours (7 courses) in Greek and Latin at the 200 level or above 
including at least 6 semester hours (2 courses) in each language. 

2. 3 semester hours ( 1 course) at the 300 level in Classical Studies or one of the 
following fields from outside the Classics program: Greek and Roman 
history, philosophy, art or religion. 

3. Latin 493 in the spring semester of the senior year, in order to prepare for and 
then take the comprehensive examination in the 9th week of the semester. 
Latin 493 is to be taken in addition to the 21 semester hours required above. 

For the major in Latin, the student must take 24 semester hours (8 courses): 
1 8 semester hours (6 courses) in Latin at the 200 level or above. 

2. 3 semester hours ( 1 course) at the 300 level in Classical Studies or one of the 
following fields from outside the Classics program: Greek and Roman 
history, philosophy, art or religion. 

3. Latin 493 in the spring semester of the senior year, in order to prepare for and 
then take the comprehensive examination in the 9th week of the semester. 
Latin 493 is to be taken in addition to the 18 semester hours required above. 



'(■•' ' , - . -'Vr- . . 247 

Classical Studies '^' '■ ^ 

222,S PERSPECTIVES ON GREEK TRAGEDY (3-0-3) 

We shall read several crucial works by each of the three great tragedians: Aeschylus' Seven 
against Thebes, and the Oresteia trilogy; Sophocles' i4ya.v, Philoctetes, and Oedipus at Colonus; 
and Euripides' Hippolytus, Suppliant Women, Heracles, and Orestes. We shall attempt to 
understand the nature of Greek tragedy by considering the civic setting and production, the 
mythological tradition, contemporary philosophical issues, and the poetic conventions of the 
genre. Not offered 1992-93. 

Yunis, H. 

315,S SOCRATES: THE MAN AND HIS PHILOSOPHY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

An appraisal of Socrates' life, thought, and achievements. Extensive readings in Plato's Socratic 
dialogues, especially the Gorgias and Protagoras. Not offered 1992-93. 

Yunis, H. 

321,F THE AGE OF NERO (3 3) 

Study of the history of Nero's reign (54-68 A.D.), and of the literary and artistic works of the 
period. Authors read will include Tacitus, Suetonius; Seneca, Lucan, Persius and Petronius. 

Wallace, K. 

335,S CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY I (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Survey of Greek myths and their extension to Rome and modern European literature. All works 
are read in English translation. 

Staff 



352,S PERICLEAN ATHENS (3-0 3) 

A close examination of what was unique about Athens during the age of Pericles: the Athenian 

empire and democracy, the crisis of the Peloponnesian war, the influence of the sophists, social 

crises as reflected in tragedy and comedy, the life and trial of Socrates. Not offered 1992-93. 

■ — ' / Yunis, H. 

491,F SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) 

Independent work for qualified juniors and seniors. 

492,S SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) 

Independent work for qualified juniors and seniors. 

Staff 

Greek ..■ ^ .i,.; ^': ■ v ■ ._.•., . .^ 

101,F ELEMENTARY GREEK I (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

NOTE: 102 must be completed to receive dist. credit for 101. Fundamentals of ancient Greek 
grammar with emphasis on acquisition of reading skills. 

Eaker. H. 

102,S ELEMENTARY GREEK 0(3 3) i-H ; 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 
Continuation of Gree 101. 

Eaker. H. 



248 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

201,F INTERMEDIATE GREEK I (3-0 3) 'v\>^! 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Review of forms and syntax followed by readings in Plato's Apology. Not offered 1992-92. 

Yunis. H. 

202,S INTERMEDIATE GREEK II (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Homer: Reading of selections from the Odyssey. Not offered 1992-93. 

Eaker, H. 

301,S ADVANCED GREEK: HERODOTUS (3 3) 

Eaker. H. 

302,S ADVANCED GREEK: TRAGEDY (3-0-3) 

Study of language, diction, grammar, meter and conventions of Attic tragedy. Reading: 

Euripides, Medea. , , , 

r2c'..;..:jJLa»ir..aui" Yunis. H. 

491,F DIRECTED READING (3-0-3) 

Independent work for qualified juniors and seniors in genres or authors not presented in other 

courses. 

Stajf 

492,S DIRECTED READING (3 3) 

Independent work for qualified juniors and seniors in genres or authors not presented in other 
courses. 

... ■: ^;r..V r-O !.;,':r. Staff 

Latin • ' ' ' 

101,F ELEMENTARY LATIN I (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

NOTE: 102 must be completed to receive dist. credit for 101. Fundamentals of Latin grammar 
with emphasis on acquisition of reading skill. 

Yunis. H. 

102,S ELEMENTARY LATIN II (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 
Continuation of Lati 101. 

Staff 

201,F INTERMEDIATE LATIN: PROSE (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Review of grammar and readings in Cicero. Prerequisite: Lati 101, 102 or equivalent. 

Eaker. H 

202,S INTERMEDIATE LATIN: POETRY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Readings in Catullus. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wallace. K. 

301,S ADVANCED LATIN: HORACE (3-0 3) '■' 

Reading of selections from the Epodes, Odes, Satires, and Epistles. 

Eaker. H. 
.\\.Ai,k.\ ' ' •" ■ '"•■"" 



: ; 249 

302,F ADVANCED LATIN: TACITUS (3 3) 

After a brief introduction to Roman historiography, we shall examine the political attitudes 
expressed in the Agricola. Most of the course will be devoted to the methods, aims, and 
techniques of Tacitus as displayed in the Annals. 

Wallace. K. 

305,F VIRGIL (3 3) 

Reading of selections from the Eclogues. Georgics, and Aenid (especially Books 7-12). Not 
offered 1992-93. 

401,S HORACE (3-0 3) 

Enriched version of Lati 301. 

Eaker. H.. 

402,F TACITUS (3-0 3) 

Enriched version of Lati 402. •■ ...- ■ 

Wallace. K.. 

405,F VIRGIL (3 3) 

Enriched version of Lati 305. Not offered 1992-93. 

420,S SATIRE IN ENGLAND AND ROME (3-0 3) 

Close study of selected satires of Horace and Pope, and of Juvenal and Dryden and Johnson. Also 

offered as Engl 408. Not offered 1992-93. 

Piper, W., Wallace. K. 

491,F DIRECTED READING (3 3) 

Independent work for qualified juniors and seniors in genres or authors not presented in other 
upper level courses. 

. - - ■ Staff 

492,S DIRECTED READING (3 3) 

Independent work for qualified juniors and seniors in genres or authors not presented in other 
courses. 

Staff 

493,S COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION (3 3) 

Reading course to be taken by all majors in the spring semester of the senior year. Preparation 
for the comprehensive examination which is to be taken in thelast week of the semester. For 
Classics and Latin majors only. 

Staff 



250 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

WTO riBn-pi'^AX •i^iTA f n 



Cognitive Sciences 



Professor Grandy, Chair 
Professors Cartwright, Cheatham, Copeland, P.W. Davis, Gorry , . 

/ .,„ , Lamb, Roediger, J.R. Thompson, Tyler, Watkins 

Associate Professors D.M. Lane, R.C. Martin, Polanyi 
■^^^'^■^ Assistant Professor Sullivan 

Degree Offered: B.A. 

The Cognitive Sciences are concerned with how the mind works. Cognitive 
scientists seek to understand perceiving, thinking, remembering, understanding lan- 
guage, learning, concept formation, and other mental phenomena. This field of study 
constitutes, under a new name and aided by new technologies, a restoration of lines of 
study that were pursued before a restructuring of universities in the eighteenth century 
broke it up into separate disciplines. As a result of that dismemberment. Cognitive 
Sciences is now treated as an interdisciplinary field. 

Research in cognitive sciences ranges from observing children, through pro- 
gramming computers to do complex problem solving, to analyzing the nature of 
meaning. The methods includeobservation and analysis, model building, experimen- 
tation, and computer simulation of mental structures and processes. 

Some students see cognitive sciences as a way to study the last frontier, the mind. 
Some see it as a way to get in on the ground floor of the information society. Some see 
it as a way to get useful experience with computers. 

Suggested preparation for the major: Computer Science 200; Psychology 101; 
Philosophy 106 or mathematical maturity; and calculus or probability theory. 

Requirements: A student majoring in Cognitive Sciences must complete twelve 
3-hour or 4-hour courses plus Cognitive Sciences 491, a 1 -hour course to be taken in 
the fall term of the senior year. The twelve courses include eight core courses as 
follows: 

Cognitive Sciences 492, Cognitive Sciences Seminar (spring term of senior year); 
Computer Science 210, Introduction to Scientific Computation (4 hours); 
Computer Science 440, Artificial Intelligence, 

or Electrical Engineering 437, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence; 
\ Linguistics 200, Language, 

or Linguistics 300, Linguistic Analysis; 
Linguistics 306, Cognitive Linguistics, 

or Linguistics 315, Information Structures; 
Philosophy 305, Mathematical Logic. 

or Philosophy 3 1 2, Philosophy of Mind 
Psychology 203, Introduction to Cognitive Psychology; 
Psychology 35 1 , Psychology of Perception, 

or Psychology 362, Physiological Psychology. 

Of the four additional courses, no more than two courses from a single department 
can be counted toward the requirements for the major; and students may not count both 
Psychology 339 and Statistics 301 toward the major requirements. 



251 
Courses: 

Anthropology 

406 COGNITIVE ANTHROPOLOGY (3 3) 

Tyler, S. 

Cognitive Sciences 

491,F COGNITIVE SCIENCES SENIOR SEMINAR (2 1) 

Discussion of current research, issues and problems in Cognitive Sciences. Seniors majoring in 
Cognitive Sciences will participate in discussions and begin work on their projects. Content 
varies from year to year. Restricted to Cognitive Sciences majors. Credit is contingent upon 
completion of Csci 492. 

Grand}', R. 

492,S COGNITIVE SCIENCES SENIOR SEMINAR (2-0-3 ) 

Continuation of 49 1 . Seniors majoring in Cognitive Sciences will work on projects and present 

reports. 491 is an absolute pre-requisite. 

Grandy. R. 

Computer Science 

210 INTRODUCTION TO SCIENTIFIC COMPUTATION (4 4) 

Staff 

320 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER ORGANIZATION (3 3) 

Soltero. L. 

382 DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS (3 3) 

Krentel, M. 

425 COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3 3) 

Bennett, J. 

440. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (3 3) 

Gorry, G. 

Electrical Engineering 

326 DIGITAL LOGIC DESIGN (3 3) 

Cyprus, J. 

437 INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (3 3) 

Staff 

498 INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS (3 3) 

Walker, J. 



252 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 
Linguistics 

200. LANGUAGE (3 3) 

300. LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS (3 3) 

301. PHONOLOGY (3-0-3) ,.,,,„„,,, :,„,uv,,„ 
306 COGNITIVE LINGUISTICS (3 3) 

315 INFORMATION STRUCTURES (3-0-3) 

402 SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS (3-0-3) 

411 NEUROLINGUISTICS (3 3) 

467 COMPUTATIONAL PROJECTS (3-0 3) 

490 DISCOURSE ANALYSIS (3 0-3) 



.:h 



Meyer, C. 

Copeland. J. 

Meyer, C. 

Lamb, S. 

Lamb. S. 

Davis. P. W. 

Tyler. S. 

Lamb. S.. Polanxi. L. 



Polanyi, L. 



491 SEMANTICS: INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVES (3 0-3) 



Philosophy . v >, .. 

303 THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (3 3) 
305 MATHEMATICAL LOGIC (3 3) 
312 PHILOSOPHY OF MIND (3-0 3) 



Polanyi. L. 
^l) 8M3T<iYg H:iTiJ*IiviOD Bii 

Sullivan. S. 

. '.■ \.':1i' .' Grandy, R. 



^^Ol^^a JIOOJ 



353 PHILOSOPHY OF LANGUAGE (3 0-3) 

357 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MATHEMATICAL LOGIC (3 3) 

Psychology 

203 INTRODUCTION TO COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY (3-0-3) 



Sullivan. S. 



Grandw R. 



Grandy. R. 



Martin. R.C. 



308 HUMAN LEARNING AND MEMORY (3 3j 

309 PSYCHOLOGY OF LANGUAGE (3 3) 

339 STATISTICAL METHODS (3-0 3) 

340 RESEARCH METHODS (3 3) 

351 PSYCHOLOGY OF PERCEPTION (3 0-3) 

362 PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY (3 3) 

Statistics 

301 MODEL BUILDING (3-0 3) 



253 

Stajf 

Martin. R.C. 

Lane. D. 

Watkins.M. 

Pome rant:. J. 

Staff 

Atkinson. E. 



254 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Computational & Applied Mathematics 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 

. » - ; . \ Professor W.W. Symes, Chair lADIT- 

Professors Akin, Bixby, Carroll, S.H. Davis, Dennis, Miele, Pfeiffer, 
, ^ D. W. Scott, Sorensen, Tapia, J. R. Thompson, 

., ^^, J C.C.Wang, and Wheeler 

Adjunct Professors Eisner, Glowinski, Kendall, Matthews, 
Morshedi, Mufti, Nunez, Peaceman, and Vu 
\ '.suviinu* . Assistant Professors Cox and Dawson 

Faculty Fellow Todd Arbogast MOOJOir 

•' Degrees Offered: B.A., M.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. The program allows each student considerable free- 
dom to plan a course of study consistent with his or her particular interests in 
mathematics and its applications. Available courses provide foundations for applica- 
tions to many fields of engineering, physical sciences, life sciences, behavioral and 
social sciences, and computer science. 

Within the flexible framework of University requirements, the program consists 
of three parts: ( 1 ) basic courses in mathematics and computer science, (2) introductory 
courses in appropriate areas of computational and applied mathematics, and (3) 
electives for which major credit is given. 

1. Students normally take eight basic courses, as follows: 

Calculus — Mathematics 101, 102 (or honors equivalent); 
Differential equations — Mathematics 211; 
. f. Multivariable calculus — Mathematics 212; 

Linear algebra — Mathematics 355 or Computational & Applied 

Mathematics 310; 

Foundation mathematics — Mathematics 321; 

Computer programming — Computer Science 210 or 212; 

Numerical analysis — Computational & Applied Mathematics 353. 

2. Students take one course in each of three of the following areas: 

Computing — At least three hours of Computer Science (but not 
Computational & Applied Mathematics 223) in addition to the above; 
Numerical analysis — Computational & Applied Mathematics 451, 
452, or 454; 

Operations research/optimization — Computational & Applied Math- 
ematics 460, 471, 472, 475, or 476; or Economics 472. 
Physical mathematics: Computational & Applied Mathematics 335, 
336, or Mathematics 381,382. 
Applied probability: Computational & Applied Mathematics 381. 



)V i . ' ( ( n,.%nu E PSyCHOLOGY <3-0-3) 

M 



255 

3. Each student will take, as a minimum, two additional courses in one of these 
areas. Students are expected to consult with a faculty adviser to work out 
a coherent package (of some three to five courses) which provides a 
reasonable foundation in the area of emphasis. 

To these are added courses in computational and applied mathematics, computer 
science, statistics, or mathematics, and appproved electives in other 
areas to bring total major credits to 55 semester hours. 

In addition to departmental requirements for the major, students must also satisfy 
University distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours 
outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 semester 
hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-90. 

A student contemplating a major in Computational & Applied Mathematics is 
encouraged to contact any member of the Department, particularly a member of its 
undergraduate committee. A faculty member will help the student explore possible 
programs suited to his or her individual needs and interests. 

The Department of Computational & Applied Mathematics participates in the 
interdisciplinary program in Managerial Studies. More information may be obtained 
from the description Managerial Studies program on page 398. 

Graduate Program. Admission to graduate study in Computational & Applied 
Mathematics is open to qualified students holding bachelor's or master's degrees (or 
their equivalent) in engineering, mathematics, or physical, biological, mathematical, 
or behavioral sciences. The credentials of each applicant will receive individual 
evaluation by the faculty of the department. A complete application folder should 
include the quantitative, verbal, and advanced scores from the Graduate Record 
Examination, all transcripts, and evidence of proficiency in English (such as the 
TOEFL) where appropriate. 

The graduate program is designed for students seeking the professional degree of 
Master of Science or the research degrees of Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy. 
It normally takes one or two years to obtain a master's and three or four years to obtain 
a doctorate. A master's degree is not a prerequisite for the doctoral degree. 

The professional degree emphasizes the applied aspects of mathematics. This 
degree is intended for persons who plan careers as practitioners rather than primarily 
as researchers. Presently, this degree emphasizes the following areas, singly or in 
combination: (1) general applied mathematics, (2) operations research and optimiza- 
tion, and (3) numerical analysis. Further information about this degree may be 
obtained from the Department. 

The granting of a research degree presupposes demonstrated ability to do 
advanced original research. Students are encouraged to initiate research activities at 
the earliest possible time in their graduate study. Presently, the research interests of the 
faculty are in the following four major areas: ( 1 ) numerical analysis and computation, 
(2) physical mathematics, (3) operations research and optimization, (4) mathematical 
modeling in physical, biological, or behavioral sciences. Further information about 
these areas may be obtained from the department. 

Graduate fellowships, research assistantships, and graduate scholarships are 
available and are awarded on the basis of merit to qualified students. Current practice 
in the department is for most doctoral students in good standing to receive some 
financial aid. As an integral part of their scholarship programs, all graduate students 
are expected to attain some proficiency in teaching by engaging in instructional 
assignments of the Department. 



256 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

c kequireiiients for the Degree of Master of Science: •"»' '^'^•^•^ 

1. Satisfactory completion of at ieasi 30 semester hours of coursework ap- 
proved by the department. 

2. At most two courses may be at the 300- (junior) level; at most two may be 
taken outside the department; and at most two courses may be transferred. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of at least 30 semester hours (including thesis) at the 
graduate level. Normally five courses must be in Computational & Applied 
Mathematics. 

2. An original thesis acceptable to the department. Note, however, that success- 
,oi, . ful performance on the qualifying examination fulfills the master's thesis 

requirement for a student working toward the Ph.D. degree. 

3. Satisfactory performance on a public oral examination on the thesis; the 
procedure for the public oral examination is given in the general rules of the 
University. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1 . Satisfactory completion of courses of study approved by the department. At 
least two courses outside the major area are required. 

2. Satisfactory performance on preliminary and qualifying examinations and 
reviews. 

3. Satisfactory completion of two semester courses or a reading examination on 
an approved foreign language. nidn^if. 

4. An original thesis acceptable to the department. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final public oral examination on the thesis; the 
..■ i procedure is given in the general rules of the University. 

1 lix". .«r 



Computational & Applied Mathematics 

Computational & Applied Mathematics Courses ^^'^ ^ 

223,F/S INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING (Variable) »3bn3tni ^i ssisab 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.6 

A self-paced (with deadlines), variable-credit course in the use of the programming languages 
FORTRAN 77, MATLAB, MAPLE, and MATHEMATICA to solve technical problems. The 
course is divided into four parts. Each part may be taken in separate semesters, but no more than 
four hours of credit may be taken. Numerical techniques for solving systems of equations and 
computer graphics are emphasized. 

Davis, Jr., S. 

310,S LINEAR ALGEBRA (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.6 

Concepts and results of linear algebra useful in a variety of fields of application. 

335,F FOUNDATIONS OF APPLIED MATHEMATICS I (3 3) 

Analytical and numerical methods for problems of fluid and solid mechanics and electromag- 
netism. Firstof a two-semester sequence. Prerequisites: Mathematics 211.212. Matlab willbe 
used extensively, 
ifijroij'juir^.ni iu §ni;:jii>;nt yd gninofiai ni YonsioiToiq 3mo;i n Cox, S, Dawson. C. 

jnamricqse . 



336,S FOUNDATIONS OF APPLIED MATHEMATICS II (3 3) 

Continuation of Computational & Applied Mathematics 335. 



257 



Cox, S. 



353,F/S COMPUTATIONAL NUMERICAL ANALYSIS (3 3) 

An introductory course in numerical analysis with computer applications. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 211. 

, . , . -;-■ ■ . ■ Staff 

376,F INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT SCIENCE (3 3) 

Mathematical models in deterministic and stochastic situations, including linear programming, 
inventory theory, decision theory, waiting line theory. Prerequisite: a statistics course. 

Staff 

378,S INTRODUCTION TO OPERATIONS RESEARCH (3-0 3 ) 

An alternative to Computational & Applied Mathematics 376 for students with a year of 

calculus. Some knowledge of linear algebra and of probability is desirable. 

Staff 

381,F/S INTRODUCTION TO APPLIED PROBABILITY (3-0 3) 
Concepts, interpretations, elementary techniques, and applications of modem probability 
theory. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 02. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 33 1 
and Statistics 381. 

Pfeiffer, P. 

420,S INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE (3-0-3 ) 
Basic principles of computational science, including vector and parallel computer architectures, 
parallel numerical algorithms, scientific visualization, analysis and enhancement of perfor- 
mance, and use of programming tools and environments. Programming assignments will involve 
hands-on experience with supercomputers and parallel computers. Prerequisites: Computer 
Science 210 and Computational & Applied Mathematics 353. 

Sorensen, D. 

432 TENSOR ANALYSIS (3 3) 

Review of Linear Algebra. Tensor Algebra. Tensor analysis on Euclidean spaces. Applications 
to particle mechanics, continuum mechanics, and electromagnetic theory. Prerequisite: Linear 
Algebra. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

451,F NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA (3-0 3) 
A study of numerical methods in linear algebra. 

Sorensen. D. 

452,S COMPUTATIONAL METHODS FOR DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 

(4-0-4) 
Finite difference, variational, and collocation methods for approximating numerically the 
solutions of ordinary and partial differential equations. Computer implementation to verify 
convergence to the solution. 

Wheeler. M.F. 

453,F NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUA- 
TIONS (3-0-3) 
Runge-Kutta, linear, multistep methods; stability analysis and stiffness for initial-value 
problems; finite difference, finite element, collocation, and shooting methods for two-point 
boundary value problems. Prerequisite; Mathematics 211. 

Staff 



258 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

454,S COMPUTATIONAL METHODS NONLINEAR SYSTEMS (3 3) 

Analysis and computer applications of modem methods for solving nonlinear algebraic 
systems and nonlinear constrained optimization problems. Prerequisite: Mathematics 211, 
212, Linear Algebra. 

Staff 

460,S OPTIMIZATION THEORY (3 0-3) ' ' 

Derivation and application of necessity conditions and sufficiency conditions for constrained 
optimization problems. Prerequisite: 212 and Linear Algebra. 

Staff 

471,F LINEAR PROGRAMMING (3-0-3) 

Formulation of managerial and technical problems; simplex method; revised simplex method; 
duality theory and applications; transportation problems; decomposition techniques. Also 
offered as Economics 471. 

Staff 
i;b i->vnn;J am 
472 GAME THEORY AND DECISION ANALYSIS (3-0-3) 

Matrix games; relation to linear programming; nonzero sum games; games againstnature; 
decision trees; models for group decisions; utility theory; benefit-cost models. Not offered every 
year. 

475,S INTEGER AND COMBINATORIAL OPTIMIZATION (3-0-3) 
Modeling and solving optimization problems with discrete components; graphs and networks; 
network flow problems; minimum spanning trees; basic polyhedral theory; some standard 
problems; computational complexity; branch and bound; cutting planes; Lagrangian relaxation; 
Benders' decomposition. Prerequisite: Computational & Applied Mathematics 471. Also 
offered as Economics 475. 

Bi.xby, R. 

476,S OPERATIONS RESEARCH - STOCHASTIC MODELS (3 0-3) 
Probability and decisions; random selection; Markov chains and decision processes; waiting 
lines; martingale models. Prerequisite: Computational & Applied Mathematics 381 or Statis- 
tics 310. Also offered as Economics 476. 

.7,/-..^:- Pfeiffer,P. 

479 OPERATIONS RESEARCH: ELEMENTARY DISCRETE OPTIMIZA- 
TION (3-0-3) 
Elementary treatment of ill-behaved optimization problems. Discrete dynamic programming 
and integer programming. Emphasis on theory, formulation, and computational methods. 
Prerequisite: Computational & Applied Mathematics 471. Not offered every year. 

483 MARKOV AND MARTINGALE SEQUENCES — RENEWAL PRO- 
CESSES (3-0-3) 
The Markov property and Markov sequences. Discrete parameter martingales. Poisson and 
other renewal processes. Prerequisite: Computational & Applied Mathematics 381. Also 
offered as Statistics 483. Not offered every year. 

490,F INDEPENDENT STUDY (Variable) 

Staff 

491,S INDEPENDENT STUDY (Variable) 

Staff 



.■■^■.- - 259 

533 ADVANCED TENSOR ANALYSIS (3 0-3) ' 

Differential and integral calculus on manifolds. Riemannian geomentry. Calculus of varia- 
tions. Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Applications to analytical mechanics, relativity and continuum 
mechanics. Prerequisite: Computational & Applied Mathematics 432. Offered occasionally. 

535 MATHEMATICAL THEORY OF NONLINEAR ELASTICITY (3 3) 

Representation theory for the constitutive relations for elasticity; homogeneous and inhomogeneous 
bodies; wave propagation; second-orderelasticity and approximations. Prerequisite: Mechanical 
Engineering 51 1, 512, or Computational & Applied Mathematics 432. Offered occasionally. 

540 APPLIED FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS (3 3 ) 

Applications of basic concepts and theorems in functional analysis to mechanics, quantum 
mechanics, and/or optimal control problems. Not offered every year. 

541,F PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I (3-0 3) 

Boundary value problems of mathematical physics; function spaces and distributions; direct 
method in the calculus of variations; Green's functions and integral equations; compact 
operators, spectral theory, regular and singular Sturm-Liouville problems. Prerequisite: Math- 
ematics 423 and 425, or consent of the instructor. 

Sraff 

542,S PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II ( 3-0 3 ) 

Continuation of 541. Local existence of solutions, Hamilton-Jacobi theory; classical theory of 
the heat and wave equaitons; weak solutions, Sobolev spaces, and boundary regularity of 
solutions of elliptic boundary value problems; additional topics at the discretion of the 
instructor. 

Cox, S. 

55 1,S ADVANCED NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA (3 3 ) 

The content of this course varies from year to year. It may be repeated if the change in content 
justifies. 

Sorensen, D. 

552 NUMERICAL METHODS PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I 

(3-0-3) 
Analysis of modem numercial methods, including finite-difference methods, finite-element 
methods, collocation methods, and associated algebraic problems. Not offered every year. 

553 NUMERICAL METHODS PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS U 

(3-0-3) 
Continuation of Computational & Applied Mathematics 552. 

554,S NUMERICAL NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING (3 3 ) 

Analysis of modern numerical methods for constrained problems, including variable metric 
methods, sucessive quadratic programming, and trust region methods. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

563,F ENGINEERING APPROACH TO MATHEMATICAL PROGRAM- 
MING (3-0-3) 
Minimization of functions of variables which are either unconstrained, or subject to equality 
constraints, or subject to inequality constraints, or subject to both equality and inequality 
constraints. Analytical methods: first-order conditions and second-order conditions. Numerical 
methods: first-order methods and second-order methods. Also offered as Mechanical Engineer- 
ing 563. 

. ; : . ..-' . ; Miele, A. 



260 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

564,S ENGINEERING APPROACH TO OPTIMAL CONTROL (3 0-3) 
Optimal control theory and calculus of variations. Minimization of functional depending on 
variables subject to differential constraints. Numerical methods; first-order methods and second- 
order methods. Also offered as Mechanical Engineering 564. 

Miele. A. 

571,S ADVANCED INTEGER AND COMBINATORIAL OPTIMIZATION 

(3-0-3) 
Material will vary from year to year. Emphasis will be on methods for solving optimization 
problems with discrete components. Possible topics include polyhedral structure of fundamen- 
tal problem classes; matrix properties of integral polyhedra: cardinality and weighted match- 
ing; matroids and polymatroids; submodular functions; the ellipsoid algorithm and its conse- 
quences; integer lattices; advanced integer programming techniques. Prerequisite: Computa- 
tional & Applied Mathematics 475. 

■' (r Bixby,R. 

574 INTEGER PROGRAMMING (3 0-3) 

Applications, theory and computational methods in pure and mixed interger programming. 

Special problem structures. Not offered every year. 

581,F MATHEMATICAL PROBABILITY I (3 3) 

Measure-theoretic foundations of probability for students who need access to advanced 
mathematical literature in probability and random processes. Open to qualified undergraduates. 
Prerequisite: Computational & Applied Mathematics 381. Also offered as Statistics 581. 

Pfeiffer.P. 

582,S MATHEMATICAL PROBABILITY H (3 0-3) 

Continuation of Computational & Applied Mathematics 581. Also offered as Statistics 582. 

Pfeiffer,P. 

5834^ INTRODUCTION TO RANDOM PROCESSES & APPLICATIONS (3-0-3) 
Formulation, analysis, representations, and applications of some standard random processes. 
Prerequisite: Computational & Applied Mathematics 381; Recommended: Computational & 
Applied Mathematics 581 or a course in real variable theory. Also offered as Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 533 and Statistics 583. 

■ iboiiJsm Icjjiamuii fn3bofrf^^-^'<^"5' ^• 

584,S ESTIMATION THEORY (3 3) 

Maximum likelihood and Bayesian vector parameter estimation. Minimum mean square error 
estimation. Time series analysis. Algorithms based on state variable and ARMA models for 
signal estimation, model identification, and spectral estimation. Prerequisite: Computational 
& Applied Mathematics 381 (583 Recommended). Also offered as Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 534 and Statistics 584. Not offered every year. 

Johnson, D. 

585 INFORMATION AND CODING THEORY (3-0-3) 

See Electrical and Computer Engineering 535. Prerequisite: Computational & Applied Math- 
ematics 381. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 535. 

587 ADVANCED STOCHASTIC PROCESSES (3 3 ) 

Measure-theoretic probability. Separability and measurability. Analytic properties of sample 
functions. Standard properties of second-order processes. Continuous-parameter Markov 
processes and martingales. Prerequisite: Computational & Applied Mathematics 581 or 583. 
Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 587. Not offered every year. 

590,F INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 to 6 hours) 

Stajf 



261 

591,S INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 to 6 hours) 

r- - ■ Stajf 

592/593 TOPICS IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS (3 3 each semester) 

Stajf 

594/595 TOPICS IN APPLIED PROBABILITY (3-0-3 each semester) 

. ■: .- Staff 

597,S SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTATIONAL & APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

(3-0-3 each semester) 

. Staff 

652,S TOPICS IN NUMERICAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS (3 3 ) 

The content of this course varies from year to year. It may be repeated if the change of content 
justifies. 

Dawson. C. 



654,F TOPICS IN OPTIMIZATION (3 0-3) 
Content varies from year to year. 



800a,b,c THESIS (Variable) 



Dennis. J. 



262 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Computer Science 



The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



^ Professor Dennis, Chair 

'''')\,\Z ' Professors Cartwright, Goldman, Gorry and Kennedy 

' Adjunct Professors Dongarra and Fox 

Associate Professors Cooper, Felleisen, Warren and Zwaenepoel 
Assistant Professors Cox, Djidjev, Krentel and Schaffer 

Faculty Fellows Mellor-Crummey and Torczon 

Adjunct Associate Professors Callahan and S. Warren 

Research Scientists Briggs, Fagan, Koelbel, McKinley 

Research Associate Moore 

Lecturers Clarkson and Duba 

Degrees Ojfered: B.A., M.C.S., M.S., and Ph.D. 



V-'. 



Undergraduate Program. During the first two years, all computer science 
majors are required to take the following courses: 
Mathematics 101, 102 (or 121, 122) 
Physics 101 
Computer Science 210, 212, 280, 320 

In addition, the following courses are strongly recommended: 
Mathematics 211, 212 
Physics 102, 132 

During the spring semester of the sophomore year, prospective majors should 
apply for admission into the program. Because enrollment in the major is limited to the 
number of students that the facilities can handle, some applications may be turned 
down. After admission, a student will plan a course of study for the junior and senior 
years with a departmental undergraduate adviser. To complete the major, a student 
must fulfill the following requirements: 

Software engineering: Computer Science 310 

Algorithms: Computer Science 382 

Linear algebra; Mathematical Sciences 310 or Mathematics 355 

Probability/Statistics: Statistics 310 or 381 

Software systems: Computer Science 412 or 421 

Hardware and architecture: Electrical and Computer Engineering 326 or 425 

Computational mathematics: one of Mathematical Sciences 353, 451, 452, 453, 

454,471 
Mathematics: one of 212, 312, 356, 425, or 463 

plus two of the following courses not used to satisfy the above requirements: 

,^ Computer Science 311,409,411,412,421,425,440,460,480,481 



263 

The courses required for the major sum to between 59 and 61 hours. Since the 
University requires 60 hours in addition to those used for the major, as many as 121 
hours may be needed to graduate. 

Undergraduate Honors Program. A student can, with the permission of the 
department, join the undergraduate honors program in Computer Science. The 
requirements for the freshman and sophomore years of the program are identical to the 
first two years in the standard program above. In order to complete the requirements 
for the major, a student must take the following courses: 

Software engineering: Computer Science 310 

Algorithms: Computer 382 

Linear algebra: Mathematical Sciences 310 or Mathematics 355 

Probability/Statistics: Statistics 310 or 381 

Software systems: Computer Science 412 and 421 

Formal languages: Computer Science 481 

Hardware systems: Electrical and Computer Engineering 425 

Computational mathematics: one of Mathematical Sciences 451, 452, 453, 454, 

471 
Mathematics: 425 or 463 

plus one of 

Computer Science 311. 409, 411, 460, 480, 492 

For more information about the program, please contact the departmental secretary. 

Graduate Program. The department offers three graduate programs: the profes- 
sional master's, the research master's and the doctoral. The professional program, a 
terminal degree program for students intending to pursue a technical career in the 
computer industry, awards the Master of Computer Science degree. To earn the degree, 
the student must successfully complete thirty semester hours of course work approved 
by the department. Up to six hours may be accepted as transfer credit. A minimum 
grade point average must be achieved over all courses counting toward the degree. The 
professional master's program normally requires three semesters of study. 

The research master's program requires a thesis in addition to coursework and 
culminates in the Master of Science degree. Admission to this program, however, is 
reserved for special situations. 

The doctoral program, offered to students planning to pursue a career in computer 
science research and education, awards the degree of Doctor of Philosphy. To earn this 
degree, the student must pass a comprehensive examination covering the core areas of 
computer science, pass a qualifying examination in an area of specialization, conduct 
original research, submit an acceptable thesis proposal, successfully defend the thesis 
proposal, submit an acceptable thesis reporting research results, and pass a final oral 
defense. Upon successful completion of the comprehensive examination, the qualify- 
ing examination and the proposal defense, the student will be awarded the Master of 
Science degree. After a successful thesis defense and the completion of all departmen- 
tal and university requirements, the student will be awarded the Doctor of Philosophy 
degree. The doctoral program normally requires four to five years of study. 

Fellowships and research assistantships are available to students in the doctoral 
program. Both provide a monthly stipend for the academic year and cover all tuition 
expenses. More substantial monthly stipends may be available during the summer for 
students working on departmental research projects. In all cases, continued support is 



264 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

contingent on satisfactory progress in the program. During the academic year, students 
in the doctoral program assist the department in the teaching and administration of 
undergraduate and graduate courses. However, such duties will not be required of any 
student for more than four semesters and will not exceed an average of ten hours per 
week. 

Current research interests of the faculty include algorithms, compiler construc- 
tion, distributed systems, geometric modeling and robotics, parallel processing, 
performance evaluation, programming environments, programming languages, pro- 
gram verification, semantics, symbolic computation, and the theory of computation. 

For further information and application materials, write the Department of 
Computer Science, Rice University, Post Office Box 1892, Houston, Texas 77251- 
1892. 



Computer Science Courses 

Note that course registrations at the 300 and 400 level may be restricted. In 
addition, course registrations at the 500 level and above require the permission 
of the instructor. 

100,F/S INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTING AND INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.6 

Introduction to computer organization, operating systems, programming languages, artificial 
intelligence, and programming. Not intended for science-engineering students. May not be 
taken for credit after any other programming course. 

Staff 

200,S ELEMENTS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.6 

A broad introduction to the major topics of computer science, including algorithms, mathemati- 
cal models of computation, machine organization and design, programming languages, commu- 
nication, and artificial intelligence. Not intended for science-engineering students. 

Staff 

210,F,S INTRODUCTION TO PRINCIPLES OF SCIENTIFIC COMPUTA- 
TION (3-3-4) 
^DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.6 

Fundamental concepts of scientific computation including recursive and iterative problem 
decomposition. Functional and imperative programming paradigms. Basic numerical methods. 
Laboratory assignments using Scheme and MATLAB, a high-level language for matrix compu- 
tations and graphics. Limited enrollment. a ;>tiq . 

Staff 

21 1,F INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING (3 6) variable credit 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.6 

Introduction to programming using Pascal. Problem solving and algorithms, elementary data 
structures, procedures and functions, debugging. No longer offered. Remains as a course number 
in awarding transfer and advanced placement credit. NOTE: Only ONE of Computer Science 
211 or 2 1 2 may be counted tor distribution. 

Staff 



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265 

212,F/S INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING (3 13) 

Programming methodology, problem solving, recursion, data structures, introduction to 
analysis of algorithms, sorting techniques. NOTE: Only ONE of Computer Science 21 1 or 2 12 
may be counted for distribution. Prerequisite: Computer Science 210. 

Stajf 

240,F THE AGE OF INTELLIGENT MACHINES (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.6 

Problems of creating minds for computers, problems commonly addressed by the field of 
computer science known as artificial intelligence. History and accomplishments of artificial 
intelligence. .Approaches to aspects of intelligence and mind through readings drawn from logic, 
philosophy, religion, psychology, linguistics, neuroscience and science fiction. 

Stajf 

280,F MATHEMATICS OF COMPUTER SCIENCE (4 4) 

Mathematical induction, recursive definitions and recurrence equations, finite state machines, 
computability. logic. Prerequisites: Mathematics 102, Computer Science 210. 

■ Stajf 

290,F/S COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECTS ( 1 4) 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. Prerequisite: permission of 
department. 

Staff 

310,F PROGRAMMING STUDIO (2 6-4) 

Advanced programming methods, including structured programming, team programming, 
program specification and testing. Prerequisites: Computer Science 212, 280. 

Staff 

311,S PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (3-3-4) 

The design, definition and interpretive implementation of programming languages including 
methods for precisely specifying syntax and semantics. Prerequisite: Computer Science 210, 
Corequisite: Computer Science 280. 

Staff 

320,S INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER ORGANIZATION (3 3 4) 

Basic computer architecture and assembly language programming. System software, including 
loaders and assemblers. Input-output devices and programming. Prerequisite: Computer 
Science 212. 

Staff 

382,S DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS (4 4) 

Design and analysis of efficient computer algorithms and data structures. Prerequisites: 
Computer Science 212, 280. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 322. 

Staff 

390,F/S COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECTS (1-4) 

See Computer Science 290. 

'^ ■; Staff 

4094^ LOGIC IN COMPUTER SCIENCE (3 3) 

Set-theoretic concepts. Propositional and first-order logic. Soundness, completeness, incom- 
pleteness and undecidability. Functional programming as an extension of first-order logic. 
Logical issues in computer science. Prerequisites: Computer Science 210, 280, 311. 



266 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

41 1,S ADVANCED PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (3-0-3) 
Formal methods for the specifications of operational semantics. Operational equivalence and 
programming language calculi. Approaches to a formalization of the programming language 
design space. Prerequisites: Computer Science 280, 311, 320. 

Staff 

4124^ COMPILER CONSTRUCTION (3-3-4) 

Topics in the design of programming language translators, including parsing, run-time storage 

management, error recovery, code generation and optimization. Prerequisite: Computer Science 

382. 

Staff 

421,S OPERATING SYSTEMS AND CONCURRENT PROGRAMMING 

(3-3-4) 
Introduction to the design, construction, and analysis of concurrent programs with an emphasis 
on operating systems, including filing systems, schedulers, and memory allocators. Specific 
attention is devoted to process synchronization and communication within concurrent programs. 
Prerequisites: Computer Science 2 1 2, 320. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 
421. 

Staff 

425,F COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3 3-4) 

Memory hierarchy, storage management, addressing, control, and input-output. Microprogram- 
ming. Comparison of solutions to computer system design problems. Prerequisites: Computer 
Science 320 and Electrical and Computer Engineering 326. Also offered as Electrical and 
Computer Engineering 425. 

Staff 

440,S ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (3-0-3) 

Techniques for simulating intelligent behavior by machine, problem solving, game playing, 
pattern perceiving, theorem proving, semantic information processing, and automatic program- 
ming . Prerequisites : Computer Science 210. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineer- 
ing 521. ,v 

Staff 

460,S INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER GRAPHICS (3-0-3) 
2D graphics techniques including fast line and curve drawing and polygon filling. 3D graphics 
problems including representation of solids, shading, and hidden surface elimination. Fractals, 
graphics standards. Not necessarily offered every year. Prerequisite: Computer Science 382. 

Staff 

461,S COMPUTER-AIDED GEOMETRIC DESIGN (3-0-4) 

Fundamental representations and algorithms for curves and surfaces in computer-aided 
geometric and hermite interpolation. Bezier and B-spline approximation. Geometric conti- 
nuity and Beta-splines. Recursive algorithms for evaluation, differentiation, subdivision and 
knot insertion. Blossoming and polar forms. Descartes' law of signs and the variation 
diminishing property. Prerequisite: Masc 353. 

480,S CONCRETE MATHEMATICS (3-0 3) 

Discrete and combinatorial mathematics, including sums and products, integer functions, 
elementary number theory, factorials, binomial coefficients, harmonic numbers, Fibonacci 
numbers, generating functions, asymptotic representations. Applications to advanced algorithm 
analysis. Not offered every year. Prerequisite: Computer Science 382. 

Staff 



267 

481,F AUTOMATA, FORMAL LANGUAGES, AND COMPUTABILITY 

(4-0-4) 
Finite automata, regular expressions, regular languages, pushdown automata, context-free 
languages, Turing machines, recursive languages, computability, and undecidability . Prerequi- 
site: Computer Science 382. 

Staff 

490,F/S COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECTS (19) 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. Prerequisite; permission of 

department. 

Staff 

491,F/S COMPUTER SCIENCE TEACHING (3 3) 

A combination of in-service teaching and a seminar. Prerequisite: permission of department. 

Staff 

492,F/S COMPUTER SCIENCE HONORS PROJECT (3 9) 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. Open only to students in the 
undergraduate honors program in Computer Science. Prerequisite: permission of the depart- 
ment. 

Staff 

511,F/S DENOTATIONAL SEMANTICS OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 

(3-0-3) 
The operational and denotational semantics of programming languages. Prerequisites: Com- 
puter Science 3 11 . 4 1 1 , 48 1 . 

• ;; Staff 

512,F ADVANCED COMPILER CONSTRUCTION (3 3 4) 

Advanced topics in the design and implementation of programming language translators. Data 
flow analysis and optimization, code generation and register allocation, attribute grammars and 
their evaluation, translation within programming environments, the implementation of advanced 
language features. Prerequisite: Computer Science 412. 

Staff 

513,F IMPLEMENTATION OF PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES (3 3-4) 
Automatic storage management. Representation of function closures and continuations. Imple- 
mentation of logic programming. Type checking in the presence of polymorphic typing and 
overloading. Compiler generation from formal semantics. 

Staff 

514,F PROGRAMMING LOGICS (3 0-3) 

Formal systems for specifying and verifying properties of programs. First order predicate logic, 
models of programming languages, and deductive systems for proving properties of programs. 

Staff 

515,S ADVANCED COMPILATION FOR VECTOR AND PARALLEL 

PROCESSORS (3 3) 
Advanced compilation techniques for vector and parallel computer systems, including the 
analysis of program dependence, program transformations to enhance parallelism, compiler 
management of the memory hierarchy, interprocedural data flow analysis, and parallel debug- 
ging- 

Staff 

519,F/S TOPICS IN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE (3-0-3) 
Content varies at the discretion of the instructor. 

Staff 



268 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

520,F DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS (3-3-4) * 

Distributed systems: workstations, local area networks, server machines. Multiprocess struc- 
turing and interprocess communication. File access and memory management. User interfaces: 
window systems and command interpreters. Case studies of selected destributed systems. 
Emphasis on performance aspects of system software design. Prerequisites: Computer Science 
421, 425. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 520. 

Staff 

525,F/S ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE (3-0-3) 
Design issues of pipelined, vector, and multiprocessor architectures. Development of perfor- 
mance evaluation techniques to model and simulate configuration of concurrent architectures. 
Software aspects ofprocessing and their effects on performance. Prerequisite: Computer Science 
425. Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 525. 

Staff 

526,S COMPUTER NETWORKS: DESIGN AND ANALYSIS (3 3) 

Design and comparison of computer networks, techniques for performance analysis, connectiv- 
ity and reliability, capacity assignment. Network topologies. Local area networks, including 
rings, busses, and contention networks. Prerequisite: Electrical and Computer Engineering 428. 
Also offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 526. 

529,S COMPUTER NETWORKS: ARCHITECTURE AND PROTOCOL (3-0-3) 

Introduction to computer networks and computer communication. Design of protocols for error 
recovery, reliable delivery, routing and congestion control. Store-and-forward networks, satellite 
networks, local area networks and locally distributed systems. Case studies of networks, 
protocols and protocol families. Emphasis on software design isues in computer communication. 
Prerequisites: Statistics 382, Computer Science 421 . Also offered as Electrical and Computer 
Engineering 529. 

Staff 

530. DATABASE SYSTEM (3-0-3) 

Survey of database system implementation and design techniques. File structures, relational, 
hierarchical and network schemes, query languages, protection and concurrent access. Prereq- 
uisite: Computer Science 382. Not offered every year. 

Staff 



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541,S KNOWLEDGE-BASED SYSTEMS (3-0-3) 

The uses of artificial intelligence to augment human capabilities. Decision support systems, 
expert systems with emphasis on applications in complex organizational settings. Conceptual 
and technical limitations of existing expert systems technology and possible remedies. Prereq- 
uisite: Computer Science 440. 

Staff 

561,F GEOMETRIC MODELING (3 3) 

Curves and surfaces: parametric form, implicit form, conversion between forms. Representation 
of solids: wireframes, octtrees, boundary representations, constructive solid geometry. Appli- 
cations: graphics, motion planning, simulation, finite element mesh generation. Prerequisite: 
Computer Science 382. 

Staff 

563,F ALGORITHMIC ALGEBRAIC GEOMETRY (3-0 3) 

Coordinate systems, commutative algebra, algebraic curves and surfaces, relational maps. 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Staff 

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269 

581,F/S THEORY OF COMPUTATION (3 3) 

Computational complexity, abstract complexity. NP- and PSPACE-completeness, polynomial 
hierarchy, cryptography. Kolgomorov complexity, parallel algorithms, random 
algorithms. Prerequisite: Computer Science 48 1 . 

Stajf 

582,F/S ADVANCED ALGORITHMS (3 3) 

Advanced design and analysis of efficient computer algorithms and data structures, lower 
bound techniques, semi-numerical algorithms, and fast Fourier transforms. Prerequisite: 
Computer Science 481. 

Staff 

583,S VLSI ALGORITHMS (303 ) 

Models of parallel computation. Design and analysis of parallel algorithms. VLSI complexity. 
Area-time tradeoffs. Area efficient VLSI networks. Prerequisite: Computer Science 382. Also 
offered as Electrical and Computer Engineering 5 1 9. 

Staff 

584,F COMPUTATIONAL GEOMETRY (3 3) 

Point location, range searching, convex hulls, proximity algorithms, intersections, geometry of 
rectangles. 

Staff 

589,F TOPICS IN THEORY OF COMPUTATION (3 3) 

Staff 

590,F/S COMPUTER SCIENCE PROJECTS (19) 

Advanced theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

Staff 

600,F/S GRADUATE SEMINAR (1-01) 
A discussion of selected topics in computer science. 

Staff 

609,F/S UNIVERSAL ALGEBRA (1-0-3) 

Elements of Universal Algebra (isomorphic algebras, quotients, direct products, varieties). 
Boolen algebras (rings, filters, ideals. Stone duality, connection to model theory and logic). 
Prerequisite: Math 463. Computer Science 409. 

Staff 

610,F/S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES ( 1-0-1 ) 
A discussion of programming language semantics in computer science. 

Staff 

612,F/S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN COMPILER CONSTRUCTION (2 2) 

Topics in construction of programming language translators. Prerequisite: Computer Science 
412. Not offered every vear. 

Staff 

615,F GRADUATE SEMINAR IN PARALLEL PROGRAMMING SYSTEMS 

(2-0-2) 
Topics in parallel programming environments and compilers for parallel computers. 

Staff 

620,F/S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN DISTRIBUTED COMPUTATION ( 1^1 ) 

Content varies at discretion of instructor. Prerequisite: Computer Science 520. 

Staff 



270 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

661,F/S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN GEOMETRIC COMPUTATION 

680,F/S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN COMPUTABILITY THEORY ( 1 -0- 1 ) 

Content varies at discretion of instructor. Prerequisite: Computer Science 581 , 582. 

Staff 

682,F/S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN GRAPH ALGORITHMS (3-0-3) 
Advanced graph algorithms, separator theorems, planar graphs. Prerequisite: Comp 582 

Staff 



690Ji'/S RESEARCH AND THESIS (1-15) 
800,F/S DOCTORAL RESEARCH (1-15) 



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27] 

Economics 



Professor B.W. Brown, Chair 
'■! Professors Brito, Bryant, Mieszkowski, Sickles, Smith, Soligo, and Zodrow 
- ' Associate Professor Hartley 

- " Adjunct Associate Professors Begley, Lairson, and Swint 

Assistant Professors Chae, Dudey, Kim, Rau,Vella, and Yi 

'' Degrees Offered: B.A.,M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Undergraduates may major in either economics or 
mathematical economic analysis. Major requirements are not subject to change for 
students who are multiple majors. 

Economics majors are required to take a minimum often courses including nine 
in Economics plus one in quantitative methods as specified in (5) below. 
Course requirements include: 
1. Economics 211 and 212; 
'■ 2. Economics 370 or 372; " " ^ 

' 3. Economics 375; 

4. Atleastthreeofthefollowing:Economics301. 355. 415, 416,417, 420, 430. 
435, 436, 438, 440, 445, 448, 450, 455, 461 , 483, 485, 486 
'■ 5. One course in quantitative methods selected from Economics 382, 400, 47 1 , 
475, 476, Mathematical Sciences 223, Stat 301, 310, 381, 410, 431, 432, 
Computer Science 211, and Accounting 305 or an approved equivalent. 

6. No more than three of the nine Economics courses may be transferred from 
'-' - : other schools (If Econ 21 1 or 212. Department qualifying exam must be 
' ''-L.1 taken). Additional transfer credits in Economics may count toward meeting 
.'c.'.ii... University graduation requirements but not toward fulfillment of the depart- 

■ ' ' mental major requirements. The required course in quantitative analysis may 
' also be transferred. 

Mathematical economic analysis majors are required to take a minimum of 15 
courses, including: 

1. Economics 211. 212, 372, 375; 

2. At least three of the following: Economics 30 1 . 355. 41 5. 41 6, 41 7. 420, 42 1 . 
430, 435, 436. 438, 440. 445. 448, 450, 455, 461. 483. 485, 486; 

3. Economics 400. 

4. Mathematics 101 and 102. 212, either Mathematics 211 or 355 or Math- 
ematical Sciences 310. and Econ. 382 or Stat 410, 43 1 or 432. 

■ 5. At least one of the following: Economics 440, 471 , 472, 475, 476, 477. 478; 

Mathematical Sciences 451. 460, 472. or an approved equivalent; 
'6. At least one research course, with prior approval, selected from: Economics 

403, 404. 495, 496. or a graduate course. 

7. Students may graduate with "Honors in Economics" by achieving a B-i- 
(3.33) average in all Economics courses and writing a senior thesis while 
taking Econ. 403 and 404 (two semesters of independent research). 



The major in Mathematical Economic Analysis is recommended for students 
intending to do graduate work in economics. Additional information regarding major 
requirements can be obtained from the departmental office. 



272 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

''*' ' In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must also 
satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours 
outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 semester 
hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors. 

Graduate Program. Admission to graduate study in economics is granted each 
year to a limited number of students who hold an undergraduate degree (or the 
equivalent), whether in economics or another field. The graduate program is designed 
primarily for students qualified to pursue a course of study leading to the Ph.D. degree. 

Training in mathematics including at least two semesters in calculus and one in 
linear algebra is a prerequisite for admission to the Ph.D. program. Students who have 
not met these requirements may be admitted to the master * s program or may take these 
prerequisites as Class III students. All applicants are required to take the Graduate 
Record Examination. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree who have good undergraduate preparation in 
economics should expect to devote two to two and one-half years to full-time course 
work plus a minimum of one additional year for the completion of the dissertation. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Demonstrate proficiency in the use of statistics. 

2. Complete an approved program of at least six courses including at least three 
500-level graduate courses. A total of 30 semester hours (including 6 hours 
for the thesis and 24 for courses), 24 of which must be in residence at Rice. 

(\Fh '^ required. Candidates for the master's degree should expect to devote a 
minimum of one year to full-time course work. 

3. Complete and defend orally a thesis presenting in prescribed form the results 
V. of original research. , .. . ■ .. ^rii ^"l 

Requirements for the Degree biP Doctor of Philosophy: 

' ! 1 . Complete an approved program of at least 1 4 courses. At least two years of 
full-time study, or the equivalent of 60 semester hours, must be in residence 

Qfii 331, ^^ ^\qq Candidates for the Ph.D. degree who have good undergraduate 
preparation in economics should expect to devote two to two and one-half 
years to full-time course work plus a minimum of one additional year for the 
completion of the dissertation. Completing the program in four years is a 
reasonable goal. 

Perform satisfactorily on written general examinations in economic theory; 
Demonstrate proficiency in a major field by: 

a. Taking the relevant courses in that field; 

b. Performing satisfactorily on a written field examination. 
Fields may be chosen from the following areas of interest: ( 1 ) economet- 
rics, (2) economic development and history, (3) economic theory, (4) 
industrial organization and regulation, (5) international trade and fi- 
nance, (6) macroeconomics/monetary theory, (7) Public Finance. 

4. Complete and defend orally a doctoral dissertation setting forth in publish- 
able form the results of original research. 



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- ■'-: ■ ■"' '■y-\:.. . ::• 273 

Economics Courses • ' 

211,F/S PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Nature of economics; the price system; household decisions; cost and supply; marginal 
productivity and capital theory; industrial organization and control; economic efficiency, 
externalities, and public goods. Also offered in summer under Continuing Studies. 

Soli go. R. 

212,F/S PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Measurement and determination of national income; money, banking, and fiscal policy; business 
cycles, unemployment, and inflation; international trade and balance of payments; other 
contemporary economic problems. Prerequisite; Econ 211. Also offered in summer under 
Continuing Studies. 

; r\ :• ' ■■ '• ;. ^'^ 

301 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE; CATEGORY II.3 

The fundamental ideas of great economic thinkers from Plato to the present. Prerequisite; Econ 
211. Not offered every year. 

■ - . ,. .. - ,,.,.. _ Stajf 

355,S MONEY AND BANKING (3-0 3) 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Demand and supply of money and other financial assets. American and international institu- 
tional trends and reforms. Prerequisite; Econ 211,212. 

Smith, G. 

370,F/S MICROECONOMIC THEORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Intermediate level analysis of markets, firms, households, income distribution, and general 
equilibrium. Prerequisite; Econ 211. Also may be offered in summer under Contuing Studies. 

Zodrow, G. 

372,S MATHEMATICAL MICROECONOMICS (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Mathematical approach to microeconomic theory. Recommended for engineering and science 
students. Students may not receive credit for both Econ 370 and Econ 372. Prerequisite: Econ 
211. Math 101. 102. 

Dudey. M. 

375,F/S MACROECONOMIC THEORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Intermediate level analysis of relationships between the levels of income, employment, interest, 
investment, consumption, and government spending. Prerequisite: Econ 211, 212, and Nsci 
101-102, or equivalent. Also may be offered in summer under Continuing Studies. 

Yi, K. 

382 ELEMENTS OF STATISTICAL METHODS (3-0 3) 

Basic concepts and techniques of probability and statistics. Applications to economics, market- 
ing, and finance. Prerequisite: Econ 21 1 and Math 102. Also offered as STAT 310. 

Staff 

400,S ECONOMETRICS (3-0-3) 

Estimation and forecasting models; topics include multiple regression time series, contingency 

table analysis, and Bayesian inference. Prerequisite: Econ 382 or Stat 381 or 382. 

Vella.F. 



274 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

403,F/S SENIOR INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3-0-3) 

Independent research project for seniors on an approved topic of their own choosing. 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

^ I c 1-., Zodrow, G. 

404J^/S SENIOR INDEPENDENT RESEARCH (3-0-S 
See Econ 403. 

Zodrow, G. 

415,S HUMAN RESOURCES,WAGES AND WELFARE (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Study of labor markets and wage determination. Special emphasis on "investment in human 
capital" through education, training, and health services. 

Vella, F. 

416 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE U.S.: 1700-1945 (3 3) 

Economic history of the United States from the Colonial Period to the end of World War II. 
Attention focuses upon the trends in per capita income and the forces behind these trends. 
Prerequisite: Economics 211. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

417 COMPARATIVE HISTORY OF INDUSTRIALIZATION (3 0-3) 
Comparative historical analysis of industrialization of Western Europe, the United States, and 
Russia from the eighteenth century to World War I. Prerequisite: Economics 211. Not offered 
every year. 

Staff 

420,F INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A study of the economic relationships between countries. Trade theory, tariffs and other trade 
restrictions, international finance, trade and development, and current policy issues. Prerequi- 
site: Econ 21 1,212, 370. 

Smith, G. 

421 INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (3 3) 

Analysis of foreign exchange and international capital markets. Linkages between exchange 
rates, interest rates, and prices. Overview of historical and institutional developments, and 
current policy issues. Prerequisite: Econ 370. 375; Stat 280 or Econ 382. Not offered every year. 

430,F COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Theoretical models of various economic systems as a basis for analyzing the operation and the 
institutional characteristics of economies including the U.S., the U.S.S.R., Yugoslavia, and 
China. Prerequisites: Econ 21 1 and 370 (or permission of instructor) 

Soli go, R. 

435,F INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATION (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Market structure, concentration, barriers to entry, and ologopoly pricing. Application of micro 
theory to industry problems. Prerequisite: Econ 21 1 or permission of instructor. 

Dudley, M. 






275 

436,S GOVERNMENT REGULATION OF BUSINESS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Analysis of governmental regulatory activities under antitrust laws and in such regulated 
industries as communications, energy, and transportation. Prerequisite: Econ 211. Econ 370, 
435 recommended. 

Johnson, W. 

438,F/S ECONOMICS OF THE LAW (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The role of economic reasoning in understanding the enactment, interpretation, and enforcement 
of the law. Applications to contracts, property, torts, discrimination, and criminal just. 
Prerequisites: Econ 21 1 and 370 (or permission of instructor) 

Brito. D. 

440,F ECONOMICS OF UNCERTAINTY (3 3) 

Decision making under uncertainty with applications to the choice of financial assets, the 
operation of insurance markets, research in markets with imperfect information and the 
microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics. Prerequisites: Econ 21 1,21 2, Math 101, 102 
and some familiarity with probability theory as gained in Econ 382, Stat 381 or 382. 

Stajf 

445,S MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS (3 3) 

Application of economics to decision making within the firm; organization theory, cost, pricing, 
and problems of control. Econ 212 desirable. Prerequisite: Econ 211. 

Sickles, R. 

448,F/S CORPORATION FINANCE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Financial analysis, planning, and control in modern corporations; includes valuation, cost and 
allocation of capital, capital markets. Prerequisite: Econ 21 1 and Acco 305. 

Staff 

450,F WORLD ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Examines past and future development in advanced and poor countries emphasizing resources, 
population, entrepreneurship. education, and planning. Prerequisite: Econ 211,212. Not offered 
every year. 

Staff 

455,S MONEY AND FINANCIAL MARKETS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Determinants of the demand and supply of money, bonds, stocks, and other financial assets. 
Financial intermediaries. Monetary policy. Inflation. International linkages of financial 
markets. Prerequisites: Econ 375 and Math 101-102, or equivalent. 

Bryant, J. 

461,S URBAN ECONOMICS (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Economic analysis of the development and problems of urban areas with particular attention to 
current policy issues. Prerequisite: Econ 2 1 1 or permission of instructor. 

Mieszkowski, P. 

471,F LINEAR PROGRAMMING (3-0-3) 

Formulation of managerial and technical problems; simplex method; revised simplex method; 
dualilty theory and applications; transportation problems; decomposition techniques. Also 
offered as Masc 47 1 . 

Boyd, A. 



276 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

472,F INTRODUCTION TO GAME THEORY (3 0-3) 

Solution concepts for different games: strategic form game, coalition form game and extensive 

form game. Elementary application to economics and political science. 

Chae. S. 

475,S INTEGER AND COMBINATORIAL OPTIMIZATION (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Modeling and solving optimization problems with discrete components, graphs and networks: 
network tlow problems; minimum spanning trees: basic polyhedral theory: the knapsack 
problem; the plant location problem; the set packing problem; computational complexity; branch 
and bound; cutting planes; Lagrangian relaxation and Bender's decomposition. Also offered as 
Masc 475. Prerequisite: Econ 47 1 or Masc 47 1 . 
Va • VAii Bi.xhy. R. 

476,S OPERATIONS RESEARCH - STOCHASTIC MODELS (3 3) 

Probility and decisions; random selection; Markov chains and decision processes, waiting lines; 
martingale models. Prerequisite: Masc 381 or Stat 382. Also offered as Masc 476. 

Pfeiffer. P. 

477 MATHEMATICAL STRUCTURE OF ECONOMIC THEORY (3 3) 

Competitive economics from a mathematical prespective, unifying calculus, matrix algebra, and 
set-theoretic approaches. Theories of household, firm; production models. Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 211, Mathematics 212, Mathematical Sciences 310. Also offered as Mathematical 
Sciences 477. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

478,S ECONOMIC APPLICATIONS OF MATHEMATICAL PROGRAM- 
MING (3-0-3) 
Topics include: Activity Analysis: Computational General Equilibrium. Intertemporal Optimation; 
Market Games; Peak Load and Public Good Pricing. Prerequisite: Masc/Econ 47 1 and Masc 46 1 . 
Not offered every year. 

Staff 

479 OPERATIONS RESEARCH, ELEMENTARY DISCRETE OPTIMIZA- 
TION (3-0-3) 
Elementary treatment of ill-behaved optimization problems. Discrete dynamic programming and 
integer programming. Emphasis on theory, formulation, and computational methods. Prerequi- 
site: Econ 471 /Masc 471. Not offered every vear. 

Slaff 

483.F PUBLIC FINANCE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Tax and expenditure policies at the federal, state, and local levels; emphasizes resource allocation 
and equity. Prerequisite: Econ 211. 

Zoilrow. G. 

485,F; 486,S CONTEMPORARY ECONOMICS ISSUES (3 3) 

Analysis of urgent and significant economic problems. Emphasis on the evaluation of policy 
remedies. Principal topics varv from year-to-vcar. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

495,F; 496,S SENIOR SEMINAR (3-0-3 each semester) 

Reading and discussion of topics in advanced economics. Open to seniors with special approval. 

Staff 

500,F/S M A THESIS RESEARCH (Variable) 

Research on an approved topic in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master's degree. 

Brown. B. 



277 

501,F MICROECONOMIC THEORY I (3 6 5) 

Theory of the firm, the theory of consumer behavior, duopoly, bilateral monopoly, imperfect 
competition, capital theory, and the theory of income distribution. 

Dudey. M. 

502,F MACROECONOMICS/MONETARY THEORY I (3 6 5) 

Macroeconomic theory of output, consumption, investment, interest rates, inflation and employ- 
ment. 

Bryant. J. 

504,F ADVANCED ECONOMIC STATISTICS (3-6-5) 

Statistical inference and the testing of hypotheses multiple and partial correlation analysis; 

analysis of variance and regression. 

Sickles. R. 

505,S MACROECONOMICS/MONETARY THEORY H (3-6-5) 
More detailed discussion of selective Macroeconomic and Monetary topics. 

Staff 

506,S TOPICS IN MACROECONOMICS/MONETARY THEORY (3 6 5) 

Selected topics of current interest. The purpose of the course is to introduce students to active 
research issues and to methods of the neoclassical school. 

Bryant, J. 

507,F MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS I (4 5 ) 

Theory of household, firm; activity analysis; set theory, matrix algebra, vector calculus, metric 
spaces, separation theory, constrained optimization. 

Staff 

508,S MICROECONOMIC THEORY H (4 5) 

Continuation of Economics 507. Set theoretic approach to general equilibrium; aggregate linear 
and nonlinear production models; existence, stability, optimality. 

Chae. S. 

510,S ECONOMETRICS I (3 6 5) 

Estimation and inference in single equation regression models, multicollinearity, autocorrelated 
and heteroskedastic disturbances, distributed lags, asymptotic theory, and maximum likelihood 
techniques. Emphasis is placed on the ability to analyze critically the literature. Prerequisite: 
Econ 504. 

Brown. B. 

511,F ECONOMETRICS H (3 6 5) 

Topics in linear and nonlinear simultaneous equations estimation, including qualitative and 
categorical dependent variables models and duration analysis. Applied exercises use SAS and 
the Wharton Quarterly Econometric Model. Prerequisite: Econ 510. 

Sickles. R. 

512,F INTERNATIONAL TRADE THEORY (3 6-5) 

Classical, neoclassical, and modem trade theory; some welfare aspects of trade, including the 

theory of commerical policy. .Applications are emphasized. 

Smith. G. 

514,S INDUSTRIAL ORGANIZATIONS AND CONTROL (3-6 5) 
Industrial markets and public policy. 

Dudex. M. 



278 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

515,F LABOR ECONOMICS (3-6-5) 

The economics of the labor market and the economic implication of trade unions. Attention is 

given to major public policy issues. Not offered every year. 

Vella. F. 

516 ECONOMIC HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT (3 6-5) 

Historical analysis of economic growth and industrialization of the U.S., Western Europe, and 
Russia in the last 1 50 years. Stresses conditions which favored or retarded growth. Not offered 
every year. 

Staff 

517 HISTORY OF ECONOMIC ANALYSIS (3 6-5) 

The development of economic analysis from the scholastics to the neoclassical school. Not 
offered every year. 

Staff 

518,S INTERNATIONAL MACROECONOMICS (3 6-5) 

Effects of fiscal and monetary policies on exchange rates, the current account and balance of 
payments. Other topics include exchange market efficiency, exchange rates and prices, LDC debt 
and policy coordination. 

519 ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT (3-6-5) 
Analysis of theory and policy questions relating to the level and rate of economic development. 

,r:U-*^t; Staff 

521,F PUBLIC FINANCE I (3 6-5) 

Theory of public goods and externalities, poliltical mechanisms and public choice, theory of local 

public goods, cost-benefit analysis and project evaluation issues of income redistribution. 

Mieszkowski, P. 

522,S PUBLIC FINANCE II (3-6 5) 

Effects of taxation on individual and firm behavior, general equilibrium tax incidence analysis, 
optimal taxation theory, optimal implementation of tax reform, analysis of comprehensive 
income and consumption taxes. 

Zodrow, G:- 



523,S OPTIMIZATION AND CAPITAL THEORY (3-6-5) 
Dynamics, capital theory and intertemporal optimization. 



Brito. D. 



530 COMPARATIVE ECONOMIC SYSTEMS (3-6-5) MYl-H 'ifU? 

Analysis of theoretical models of market and centrally planned economics; national economic 
systems of the Soviet Union, China, Yugoslvia, Western European countries, and the United 
States. Not offered every year. 

Staff 

536 GOVERNMENT REGULATION OF INDUSTRY (3 6-5) 

Advanced analysis of the economics of antitrust and other forms of regulation. Not offered every 

year. 

Staff 

561,S URBAN ECONOMICS (3 6-5) 

Analysis of urban development and such urban problems as housing, land use, transportation, 

discrimination, and pollution. 

VkCH ( ^;:(i;»h!e ' Mieszkowski. P. 

. ' . !ol( ;it,icrtnl ihr fcq.::ri.-aKn' - fof th' 



279 

565 HEALTH ECONOMICS (3 6 5) 

Economic aspects of health; production, cost demand and supply factors; methods of payment 
and effects of regulation. 

Lairson, D., Swint, J. 

573 NONLINEAR PROGRAMMING (3 3) 

Theory and computational methods for nonlinear programming, including: Kuhn-Tucker 
conditions, duality theory, methods for constrained optimization of convex and nonconvex 
problems. Also offered as Mathematical Sciences 573. Not offered every year. 

Stajf 

517 TOPICS IN ECONOMIC THEORY I (3 0-3) 

Selected topics in advanced economic theory. Prerequisite: Economics 508. Not offered every 

year. 

Staff 

578 ECONOMIC THEORY H (3 3) 

Selected topics inadvanced mathematical economics. Not offered every year. Prerequisite: Econ 
508 or Econ/Masc 478. 

Staff 

579 TOPICS IN ECONOMIC THEORY III (3 3) 

Selected topics in advanced economic theory. Prerequisite: Economics 508. Not offered every 
year. 

Staff 

591,S; 592,F TOPICS IN POLICY AND APPLIED ECONOMICS (3-6 5 each 
semester) 

Staff 

593,F WORKSHOP IN ECONOMETRICS (3 3) 

The course is designed to expose graduate students to advanced topics in applied and theoretical 
econometrics through guest lectures by leading researchers in the field. Students participating 
in the seminar are expected to prepare, over the course of the year, a research paper and present 
it in the workshop. 

Sickles, R. 

594,S WORKSHOP IN ECONOMETRICS (3-0-3) 

The course is designed to expose graduate students to advanced topics in applied and theoretical 
econometrics through guest lectures by leading researchers in the field. Students participating 
in the seminar are expected to prepare, over the course of the year, a research paper and present 
it in the workshop. 

Sickles. R. 

595,F READINGS IN ADVANCED TOPICS (3-0-3) 

Staff 

596,S READINGS IN ADVANCED TOPICS (3-0-3) 

Staff 

800,F/S GRADUATE RESEARCH (Variable) 

Brown, B. 



280 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Education ^ ^ >iMnvrn v* 



Associate Professor D. Shirley, Chair 
Associate Professor J.D. Austin (on leave of absence 1992-93) and L. McNeil 
Assistant Professor E. Harcombe 
itsv /7 , 1 Clinical Professor Marvin HofTman 
>V' Visiting Assistant Professor Elizabeth Heckelman 

Degrees Ojfered: Secondary Teaching Certificate in conjunction with B.A. in 
major field; Master of Arts in Teaching 

Teacher Education and Certification. Rice University seeks to prepare teach- 
ers who will be leaders in their schools and in the profession. Students are admitted 
into the teacher education program on the basis of their commitment to teaching, their 
record of scholarship in their subject fields, and their promise as a reflective, engaging 
teacher. Students graduate from the professional preparation at Rice knowledgeable 
about their own teaching fields, about children and children's learning, about schools 
and school policy and about a broad diversity of teaching styles and methods. Rice 
offers three teacher education plans: undergraduate preparation in combination with 
the undergraduate degree in the subject field/s; a Master of Arts in Teaching; a post- 
baccalaureate plan under Class III status which involves taking only those courses 
needed for certification but does not confer a degree. All three plans include intensive 
study in the teaching field, courses in professional preparation, teaching in the Rice 
Summer School for High School Students and, for post-baccalaureate students in the 
MAT or Class III plans, a paid Internship in an accredited secondary school. While 
maintaining complete institutional integrity. Rice University teacher education pro- 
grams comply with state of Texas certification requirements. 

In addition, the Rice University Department of Education closely cooperates with 
departments offering work in subject matter fields. It is the function of this department 
to provide rigorous professional courses and to administer the established teacher 
education programs. 

The Rice University teacher education program strives to fit the prospective 
teacher to perform all the roles which may be expected of a teacher. To accomplish this 
objective, it gives sustained close attention to the following vitally interrelated 
components: 
.5\'_ 1. A sound liberal or general education. 

2. An extended knowledge of the subject(s) or area(s) to be taught. 

3. Professional knowledge (i.e., relevant historical, philosophical, social, and 
'..•-!• psychological basis of education). 

.( 4. Skills in classroom teaching, in working with children and adults, and in 
supervising the learning process. ;.,, ." , ' 

Admission to the Undergraduate Teacher Education Program. Students who 
have satisfied the following requirements may apply to the Rice University Teacher 
Education Council for admission to the teacher education program: 

1 . Junior standing at Rice University. 

2. A grade of "C" or better in all semester hours attempted in applicant's 
teaching field(s). 



281 

3. Evidence of adequate physical vigor and strength, and absence of obvious 
physical conditions which might interfere materially with performance as a 
teacher in a classroom. 

4. Approval of a completed Teacher Certification Program form by the appro- 
priate departmental representatives and the Teacher Education Council prior 
to registration for the junior year. 

5. Satisfactory scores on all preprofessional skills tests. 

Applications for both undergraduate and post-baccalaureate teacher education 
programs are available in the department offices. 

Requirements for a Texas Provisional Teaching Certificate (Grades 7-12). 
Rice University is approved by the state of Texas to offer teacher preparation programs 
in the following fields: art, biology, chemistry, computer education, earth science, 
economics, English, French, German, health education, history. Latin, mathematics or 
mathematical sciences, physical education, physics, political science, psychology, 
Russian, general science, social studies, sociology, and Spanish. 

After satisfactory completion of the Rice University teacher education program, 
the student will be recommended for a Texas teaching credential. The Texas Education 
Agency will then award the student a Texas Provisional Teaching Certificate, Grades 
7-12. 

For undergraduate students, the Rice University teacher preparatory program 
requires the following: 

1. A bachelor's degree. 

2. Foundations in Arts and Sciences ( recommended to be completed during the 
.- ,, freshman and sophomore years): a broad base of liberal arts courses, 

including Rice distribution requirements and a state requirement for com- 
puter literacy. Please check with Education faculty for requirements for 
students who are undergraduates. MAT candidates or non-degree (Class III) 
candidates to satisfy those courses deemed necessary to support their 
, , _ preparation to teach. The state of Texas permits each university to devise a 
. course of study for post-baccalaureate students according to their need to 

have a sound general education. The faculty member in the Department of 
Education assigned to advise the student will be responsible for determining 
those background courses needed. 

3. Academic Specialization (student selects one of the following plans): 
Plan I. Preparation to teach one field: At least 36 hours in teaching 

fieldwith at least 1 2 semester hours of advanced work. All courses 
-:, . , must be approved by the Rice Teacher Education Council. 

. ' .- Plan II. Preparation to teach two fields: At least 24 semester hours in each 
field with 1 2 semester hours of advanced work in each field. 
Courses must be approved by the Rice Teacher Education 
Council. 
Plan III. Preparation to teach related fields: At least 48 semester hours in 
; . ; . a composite field (general science or social studies) with at least 

1 8 semester hours of advanced work. Courses must be approved 
by the Rice Teacher Education Council. 

4. Professional Education. 18 semester hours consisting of the following: Educ 
311,312. 409, 3 semester hours in the appropriate Seminar in Teaching, and 
6 hours in student teaching (Principles of Teaching). 



282 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



b 6. Supervised Teaching Experience. Either of two plans may be followed by 

teacher education candidates. 

1. Apprenticeship Plan (Plan A): 

■'■■.,. . Prerequisite: Educ 304, 31 K 312. 

Apprenticeship is designed for students who wish to complete prepara- 
tion for their teaching careers in four years and two six-week summer 
Tc :3sji! sessions. Candidates will enroll for the summer session following their 
junior year. The apprentice will assist and teach under the supervision of a 
master teacher and University faculty in the Rice Summer School for High 
'' '- School Students. 

Educ 409 and a 400-level course. Seminar in Teaching, are to be 
completed during the senior year. 

Following graduation from Rice, the apprentice will again teach in the 
Rice Summer School for High School Students under the supervision of a 
master teacher and University faculty. The apprentice is not remunerated for 
teaching either summer. He or she is recommended for the Texas Provisional 
Teacher's Certificate following successful completion of the second summer 
_, ,. ... and state ExCET tests. 

2. Internship Plan (Plan B): 

Prerequisite: Completion of all course work except student teaching. 

Under this plan, students are expected to attend a six-week summer 
session immediately following their graduation from Rice. Each intern will 
observe and teach classes under the supervision of a master teacher and 
University faculty in the Rice Summer School for High School Students. 
During the following fall semester, interns will teach in a neighboring school 
system. Such placement will be subject to the availability of openings in the 
intern's teaching field(s). 

The intern will be employed for full-time duty and will teach under the 
supervision of a member of the cooperating school system and a faculty 
member from the University. The intern will complete all requirements in the 
seminar accompanying intern teaching. During the half year of service, the 
intern will be paid a salary commensurate with the salary being paid a full- 
time teacher with a degree and an emergency teaching permit by the 
:<; cooperating school system. Upon successful completion of the internship 
J,;- semester and upon the recommendation of the secondary school principal, 

the intern will be offered a regular teaching contract for the spring semester 
, if a suitable vacancy exists. He or she will be recommended for a Texas 
" : ■ Provisional Teacher's Certificate after successful completion of state ExCET 
tests. 

Program for the Master of Arts in Teaching. Most candidates entering the 
program will have had no professional education courses. During the program, 
candidates usually fulfill all requirements for a Texas Provisional Teaching Certifi- 
cate. The program consists of the following components: 

1 . Courses in secondary school educational theory, teaching strategies, educa- 
tional practice, and evaluation. 

2. Graduate and upper division courses in the candidate's teaching field(s). 
(See teaching fields, above.) ^' .luni mihii-"*^ ni-^um<- m r.iuouO 



:, .,■ -.■,-■■ -^ ■. -.-— 283 

3. Supervised full-time teaching in the Rice Summer School for High School 
Students for one summer. Candidates will be responsible for the design and 
implementation of courses, for teaching, and for evaluation. 

4. Supervised teaching internship for one semester in a cooperating public 
school system, including the seminar accompanying the internship. 

Normally, the degree program will consist of 1 1 semester courses. However, some 
candidates may need to remove deficiencies for certification and may therefore require 
additional courses. 

Students in the internship semester will not normally be eligible for Rice Graduate 
Fellowships or scholarship support since the cooperating school districts pay a salary 
for internship teaching. However, a limited number of tuition waivers is available, as 
are paid assistantships. 

Please refer to page 138 for additional information regarding admission to the 
graduate program in education. 

Class III Certification, The Rice Department of Education also provides a non- 
degree (Class III) plan for teacher certification for those who hold a bachelor's degree 
but do not choose to pursue a graduate degree. Inquiries should be directed to the Office 
of Continuing Studies for their admission requirements. Once the applicant is 
approved by Continuing Studies for admission to Rice, application to the Teacher 
Education Program can be reviewed by the Department of Education. 



Education Courses 

304,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING ( 1 -0- 1 ) 

A study of procedures and materials used in teaching various subject areas. Preparation of 
teaching units, orientation to secondary school teaching. Prerequisite Educ 311. Science 
Education. English Education, Social Studies Education, Physical Education, Art, Foreign 
Language Education. Mathematics Education. (See appropriate section designation.) 

Staff 

311,F HISTORICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATIONS (3 3) 

Analysis of historical and contemporary theories and practice in American education. Prerequi- 
site (those intending to complete Rice teacher preparatory program ); permission of instructor and 
filing of Teacher Certification Plan. May be elected by students not in the teacher education 
program. 

McNeil. L.. Heckelman. E. 

312,S PSYCHOLOGY OF HUMAN LEARNING (3 3) 

Introduction to theoretical systems of human learning with emphasis on implications for 
secondary education; introductory tests and measurements. May be elected by students not in 
the teacher education program. 

Heckelman, E. 

400,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (2 2) 

(Apprentice English teachers only) Prerequisites: Educ 304, 409. 

McNeil. L.. Hoffman. M. 

402,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (2-0 2) 

(Apprentice social studies teachers only) Prerequisites: Educ 304. 409. 

Staff 



284 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

404,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (2 0-2) 

(Section I, apprentice teachers in mathematics education only; section 2, apprentice teachers in 

science education only) Prerequisites: Educ 304, 409. 

Heckelman. E. 

406,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (2-0-2) '^ ^'^^ ?i"'bubni .n 

(Apprentice health and physical education teachers only) Prerequisites: Educ 304. 409. 

Staff 

407,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (2 2) 

(Apprentice art teachers only) Prerequisites: Educ 304, 409. 

Staff 

408,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (2 2) 

(Apprentice foreign language teachers only) Prerequisites: Educ 304, 409. 

McNeil. L., Staff 

409,F FUNDAMENTALS OF SECONDARY EDUCATION (3 0-3) 
Background, purposes, and organization of modem secondary schools and their curricula; the 
policy and administration of secondary schools. Introductory educational research. May be 
elected by students not in the teacher education program. 

Austin, J., McNeil. L. 

410,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (3-0 3) 

(English teachers only) Students with credit in Educ 304 mav not enroll. Prerequisites: Educ 311, 

409. 

Hoffman. M 

412,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (3 3) 

(Social studies teachers only) Students w iih credit in Educ 304 may not enroll. Prerequisite: Educ 
311,409. 

Staff 

414,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (3-0-3) 

(Section 1 , mathematics education; section 2, science education.) Same as Educ 304. Students 

with credit in Educ 304 may not enroll. Prerequisites: Educ 311, 409. 

Heckelman. E. 

416,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (3-0 3) 

(Health and physical education teachers only) Students with credit in Educ 304 may not enroll. 

Prerequisites: Educ 311, 409. 

Staff 

417,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (3-0-3) 

(Art teachers only) Students with credit in Educ 304 may not enroll. Prerequisites: Educ 311, 

409. 

. . Staff 

418,S SEMINAR IN TEACHING (3 3) 

(Foreign language teachers only) Students with credit in Educ 304 may not enroll. Prerequisites: 
Educ 31 1,409. 

McNeil. L. 

419,F/S SUPERVISED TEACHING (3-0-3) 

Field-based practicum for secondary teachers, with accompanying seminar. 

Heckelman. E. 



: - .-^ • '^ ■--: 285 

420 SUPERVISED TEACHING (3-0-3) ^^ 

Student teaching in the Rice Summer School for High School Students under the supervision of 
assigned Master Teacher. Prerequisites; Educ 311, appropriate seminar(s) in teaching and 
consent of instructor. Undergraduates will typically repeat for credit. 

Stajf 



509 

MAT equivalent of Educ 409. 

511 

MAT equivalent of Educ 311. 

512 '""' ' 

MAT equivalent of Educ 312. 



McNeiL L. 



Heckelman. E.. McNeil, L. 



Heckelman. E. 



5 19,F/S SUPERVISED TEACHING (3 0-3 ) 

Field-based internship for secondary teachers, with accompanying seminar. 

Heckelman, E. 

590 CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL MATHEMAT- 
ICS (6-0-6) 
Selected topics in secondary school mathematics. Offered in summers as needed. Enrollment by 
consent of instructor. 

• 'r ^ ■■ ' ; • \ Austin, J. 

591,S INDEPENDENT STUDY AND RESEARCH (3 3) 

Harcombe, E.; McNeil. L.: Shirley, D. 

592,F SEMINAR IN SCIENCE FOUNDATIONS (3 3 ) 

Selected topics in seminar with practicing scientists. Open to graduate level and Class III 
students. 

Harcombe, E. 

593,F PRACTICUM IN TEACHING SCIENCE (2-0 2) 

Open to graduate level and Class III students. 

Harcombe. E. 

594,S PRACTICUM IN TEACHING SCIENCE (2 2) 

Open to graduate level and Class III students. 

Harcombe. E. 

595 CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN SECONDARY SCHOOL SCIENCE AND 

MATHEMATICS (3 3) 
Offered in summers as needed. Enrollment by consent of instructor. 
^ . . Austin. J 



I : 



286 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



^ ! "~ ' Professor Tittel, Chair 

Professors C.S. Burrus, J.W. Clark, D. H. Johnson, Jump, 

Pearson, Rabson, and W.L. Wilson 

Adjunct Professors Bor, Porter, Sherwood, Szabo and Tsuchitani 

Associate Professors Aazhang, Antoulas, Sauerbrey, Sinclair, Varman, and Young 

Adjunct Associate Professors Eggers and Harman 

Assistant Professors Baraniuk, Bennett, Cavallaro, Halas, and Walker 

Adjunct Assistant Professors Giles, Jacques, Krishen and Philippe 

Lecturers Bourland, Eggers, Cyprus, Henson, Massey, Smayling, and Wendt 

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S., M.E.E., M.S., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. The four-year program in electrical engineering leads 
to either the B.A. or the B.S. in Electrical Engineering. The B.S. program has more 
technical requirements, and is the only degree accredited by the Accreditation Board 
for Engineering and Technology, while the B.A. program allows more flexibility with 
electives. It is possible in either program to satisfy major requirements of two 
departments. Students may take a double major combining electrical and computer 
engineering with computer science, physics, mathematics, economics, languages, or 
other disciplines. 

Students contemplating a major in electrical and computer engineering should 
take: 

Mathematics 101, 102, 21 1, 212 (or the corresponding honors courses) 

Physics 101, 102, 132 

Chemistry 101 

Computer Science 210 

Electrical Engineering 241 

Two (one for CSE option, see below) courses selected from: 
Chemistry 105, Physics 201, 202 

One science lab selected from: 
Chemistry 105, Physics 231 

One of the following to satisfy the B.S. requirement for an engineering science 
course from another engineering department: Mechanical Engineering 200, 211, 
Materials Science 301. 

Electrical Engineering 301, 305, 320, 326, 342 (all of these courses are required 
for the B.S. degree, while any four of them are required for the B.A. degree) 

Although a general program of study can be arranged, the program in electrical 
engineering is best described in terms of three major areas of concentration. For areas 
of specialization other than Computer Engineering, this program consists of six 
courses taken in the area of concentration (see below) and two related electrical 
engineering courses outside the major area. For the B.S. degree, one of those courses 
must be an engineering science course, and the other must be an engineering design 
course. 



287 

For the Computer Engineering option, the B.S. degree program consists of nine 
courses as specified below. Students planning to specialize in Computer Engineering 
need not take the second semester of chemistry or the second year of physics that is 
required for other areas of specialization. 

Circuits, Controls, and Communication Systems 

This specialization is composed of four subareas: (1 ) circuits and electronics, (2) 
robotics and control, (3) signal processing and communications, and (4) bioengineer- 
ing. These are closely related and generally involve the study of processing and 
communicating signals and information through systems of devices. The major area 
courses are Mathematical Sciences 330, 335, 336; Electrical Engineering 331, 401, 
430,436. 

Computer Engineering 

This program permits students to develop a broad background in the general area 
of computer systems engineering and provides preparation for further study and the 
opportunity to specialize in the sub-areas of computer architecture, computer hardware 
engineering, computer software engineering, and computer systems performance 
analysis. The major area courses are: Computer Science 212. Mathematical Sciences 
381, Mathematical Sciences 310, 355, or 353, Computer Science 280, and Electrical 
Engineering 322, 421, 425, 424 or 426, 428. 

Lasers, Microwaves, and Solid-State Electronics 

This area of concentration permits undergraduate students to study and partici- 
pate in several specialties, including laser technology, optical communication sys- 
tems, application and development of tunable laser devices, semiconductor devices, 
opto-electronic devices, and integrated optics and VLSI circuits. The major area 
courses are Mathematical Sciences 340, Electrical Engineering 306, 459, 461. 462, 
463. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students seeking the 
B. A. degree must also satisfy the distribution requirement and complete no fewer than 
60 semester hours outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 
130 semester hours. For the B.S. degree, a total of 134 semester hours are required. See 
Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-90. 

Graduate Program. Requirements of a general nature for advanced degrees are 
outlined on pages 143-146. Students should consult departmental advisers for specific 
courses of study. 

A candidate for the professional degree of Master of Electrical Engineering is 
required to complete an approved sequence often advanced courses. See Professional 
Degrees in Engineering, page 139. 

A candidate for the Master of Science degree in the Department of Electrical and 
Computer Engineering is required to complete an approved course of study. In 
addition, the candidate is required to complete an approved research program and 
submit an acceptable thesis. The M.S. degree is not a terminal degree, but part of the 
Ph.D. program at Rice. 

The granting of the Doctor of Philosophy degree presupposes academic work of 
high quality and demonstrated ability to do independent and creative research. To be 
admitted to candidacy, the student must obtain high standing in an approved course 
program and perform satisfactorily on qualifying examinations. Normally, the candi- 



288 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

date completes the requirements for an M.S. degree as part of the Ph.D. program. 
Emphasis is placed on research leading to a satisfactory dissertation. Each candidate 
takes a final oral examination. The doctoral candidate should expect to spend a 
minimum of three academic years of graduate study in this program. 



Electrical Engineering Courses 

241,F/S ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS (3-3-4) 

Basic circuit elements, mesh and node analysis, Thevenin and Norton equivale nt circuits, 
controlled sources and op-amps solution of circuits, differential equations, use of phasors and 
impedance for sinusoidal AC analysis, frequency response. Laboratory on basic electrical 
measurements. Prerequisite: Math 101, 102 or equivalent. 

Johnson. D., Burrus, C.S. 

301,F/S NETWORK AND SYSTEMS THEORY (3-0-3 ) 

Analysis of linear systems using circuits as the primary example. Time and frequency domain 
analysis: solution of differential equation, convolution, and the Laplace transform. State- 
variable analysis. Limited enrollment. Prerequisite: Engi 241. 

Walker, I., Henson, T. 

305,F ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND WAVES (3-0 3) 
Distributed systems. Transmission lines. Smith Charts and impedance matching. Static and 
oscillatory fields. Maxwell's equations. Interaction ofwaves with media optical fibers antennae. 

3Dr u 2i. Tittel.F. 

306,S ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THEORY (3-0-3) 

Electrostatic fields and boundary value problems. Magnetic fields and interaction with 
materials. Time dependent electromagnetic fields. Plane waves, waveguides, and resonators. 

Young, J. 

320,F/S INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER ORGANIZATION (3 3-4) 
Basic computer architecture and assembly language programming. Systems software, including 
loaders and assemblers. Input-output devices and programming. Prerequisite: Comp 211 or 
Comp210. 

Varman, P., Staff 

322,S DESIGN/ANALYSIS OF ALGORITHMS (3-3-4) 

Design and analysis of efficient computer algorithms and data structures. Prerequisite: Comp 
212, Comp 280. Also offered as Comp 382. 
.,...^„^,: Warren. J. 

326,F/S DIGITAL LOGIC DESIGN (3 3 4) 

Gates, flip-flops, combinational and sequential switching circuits, registers, data transfer 
paths, logical and arithmetic operations. Prerequisite: Comp 21 1 or Comp 210, Engi 241 . 

Cyprus, J., Jump, J. 

331,F/S APPLIED PROBABILITY (3 3) 

Concepts, interpretations, elementary techniques, and applications of modem probability 
theory, including a brief introduction to statistical inference. Prerequisite: Math 102. Also offered 
as Masc 381 and Stat 381. 

Pfeiffer. P 



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289 



342,F/S ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS (3-3-4) 

Models of transistors, FETs, and integrated circuits. Biasing methods, two-port analysis, single 
and multistage amplifiers, frequency domain characteristics, feedback, stability, oscillators, 
power amplifiers. Prerequisite: Engi 241. 

Wilson, W., Massey, R. 

4014^ SIGNALS AND LINEAR SYSTEMS (3-0-3) 

Representation and analysis of signals and linear systems using Fourier transforms and 
convolution. Applications include modulation, gating, sampling, and filtering. Generalized 
functions and transforms. Bilateral Laplace and Z transforms. Prerequisite: Elec 301 and a 
knowledge of complex variable theory. 

Antoulas, A.C. 

All^ OPERATING SYSTEMS AND CONCURRENT PROGRAMS (3-3-4) 
Introduction to the design, construction, and analysis of concurrent programs with an emphasis 
on operating systems, including filing systems, schedulers, and memory allocators. Specific 
attention is devoted to process synchronization and communication within concurrent programs. 
Prerequisite: Comp 212, Elec 320. Also offered as Comp 421. 

Zwaenepoel, W. 

424,S COMPUTER SYSTEM DESIGN (3 4-4) 

The specification, design, and implementation of practical computer systems, taking into 
account such factors as cost constraints and available technology. Details of data path, control 
unit, and memory system design. Comparison of various bus architectures. Techniques for 
peripheral interfacing. Laboratory will include a major design project. Prerequisite: Elec 326, 
425, 426. 

Bennett, J. 

425,F COMPUTER SYSTEMS ARCHITECTURE (3 3-4) 

Structure and organization of processor, memory and control elements. Management of memory 
hierarchy. Microprogramming. Interaction of instruction set and system architecture. Prereq- 
uisite: Elec 320, 326. Also offered as Comp 425. .i. -i. ; - ..fijo-j •• 

Jump, J.R. 

426,F DIGITAL SYSTEM DESIGN (3-3-4) - »4. . c 

Synchronous and asynchronous sequential circuits. Techniques for processing and control unit 
design including microprogrammed controllers and high speed arithmetic circuits. Prerequisite: 
Elec 320, 326. 

Bennett, J. 

4274^ PULSE AND DIGITAL CIRCUITS (3-3-4) 

Discrete and integrated solid state circuits. Interaction of linear components with diodes, bipolar 
transistors, and field effect transistors. Monostable, bistable, and astable multivibrators. 
Applications of linear one and two degree of freedom circuits to digital hardware. Analysis of 
circuits and their interconnection to form digital systems. Construction of digital projects from 
discrete and integrated circuits. Prerequisite: Elec 342 and Elec 326. 

Cyprus, J. 

428,F COMPUTER SYSTEMS PERFORMANCE (3-3-4) 

Analytical models of computer systems. Queueing theory and Markov chains. Simulation and 
analysis of simulation results. Operational analysis. Course will include a project. Prerequisite: 
Elec 425. Elec 381 or Masc 382. 

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290 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

430,S COMMUNICATION THEORY AND SYSTEMS (3-0-3) 
Review of applied probability theory. Introduction to stochastic processes. Complex-signal 
analysis. AM and FM. Digital communication, PCM, signal transmission, optimum receiver 
theory, information theory and coding. Prerequisite: Elec 401 and either Elec 33 1 or Masc 382. 

Aazhang, B. 

436,S CONTROL SYSTEMS I (3-0-3) >,Y» «A 

Representation, analysis, and design of simple control systems in the frequency domain.. 

Prerequisite: Elec 301. 

Pearson, J. B. 

438,S REMOTE SENSING (3-0-3) 

Remote sensing using wave propagation. Statistical formulation of diffraction problems. Wave 
scattering from rough surfaces. Applications include monitoring from space and non-contact 
sensing for robotics and automation. 

Krishen, K. 

442,S ADVANCED ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS (3-3-4) 

Electronic circuits used in communication and other systems, including principles of feedback, 

modulation, detection, and active filtering. Emphasis on design. Prerequisite: Elec 342. 

Massey, R.- 

4434^ POWER ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS (4-0-4) 

Emphasis on design of electronic circuits used in power systems, including prir.ciples of phase- 
controlled rectification, high-frequency inversion, conversion and cyclo-conversion. Prereq- 
uisite: Elec 342. 

Massey, R. 

459,F QUANTUM MECHANICS (3-0-3) 

Schroedinger's equation; harmonic oscillators; band theory of solids; hydrogen molecule; spins 
and angular momentum; interaction ofmatter with radiation; spectroscopy; scattering processes 
and nonlinear susceptibility; quantum statistics; transport phenomena. 

•■■\ 'V^'^ Young, J. 

461,F ELECTRICAL PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS (3-0-3) 
Properties and parameters of dielectric, conducting, and semiconducting materials important in 
the understanding of device characteristics. Coreq- Elec 459. '■■' 

Halas, NA 

462,S SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES (3-4-4) ' " 

Physical principles and operational characteristics of semiconductor devices. Prerequisite: Elec" 
461. i 

Wilson, W:^ 

463,S QUANTUM ELECTRONIC DEVICES (3-0-3) 

raphy, andopti 

Sauerbrey, R. 



Lasers, optoelectronics, integrated optics, nonlinear optics, holography, and optical processing. 



481,F FUNDAMENTALS OF NUEROSCIENCE (4-0-4) 

An introduction to the field of Neuroscience that includes the anatomy and physiology of the 
vertebrate nervous system, as well as electrical measurement and mathematical modeling 
techniques that are frequently employed in the study of the nervous system. The topics covered 
in the area of neurophysiology include the electrophysiology of peripheral and central nervous 
system neurons, skeletal muscle, synaptic and neuromuscular transmission, evoked potentials 
form the spinal cord and brain. The electrophysiology of selected general sense receptors and the 
auditory, vestibular, and visual systems are also included. Electronic fundamentals associated 
with the design and construction of useful instrumentation systems are studied, as well as the 
numerical methods used to implement mathematical models that describe various biological 
elements of the nervous system. A term project is required. Prerequisite: Engi 241, 342. 

Clark Jr. , J. 



291 

482,S FUNDAMENTALS OF THE CARDIOVASCULAR, PULMONARY 

AND RENAL SYSTEMS (4 0-4) 
An introduction to the anatomy and physiology of a number of organ systems in the body 
including the cardiovascular, pulmonary and renal systems as well as the autonomic nervous 
system controlling their function. Specific topics covered in the cardiovascular area include 
cardiac electrophysiology, ventricular mechanics, neural control of heart rate, myocardial 
contractility and vasomotor tone; in the pulmonary area: pulmonary mechanics, gas exchange 
and neural control of respiration; in the renal area: transport and exchange mechanisms in the 
kidney, neurohormonal control of tubular function and water balance. The class is exposed to 
advanced topics concerned with the design and construction of useful instrumentation systems 
as well as mathematical models associated with these research areas. For example, fundamental 
methods of sensing pressure, length, temperature, etc. are discussed as well as the design of 
instrumentation systems for monitoring these physical variables. A term project is required. 
Prerequisite: Elec 342, Elec 30 1 , Elec 48 1 . 

Clark Jr., J. 

490,F/S ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING PROJECTS (Variable) 
Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

Stajf 

491,F SENIOR HONORS PROJECTS (2) 

A two-semester sequence for individual projects supervised by a faculty member of the 
department. The portions of the first semester course (49 1 ) are devoted to group discussion of 
professional aspects of engineering: technical writing, engineering ethics, research protocols, 
patent considerations. A written proposal describing the project is required. Oral presentations 
throughout the year culminating in a final written report and in an oral, conference-style 
presentation. Senior standing in the department and permission of the course coordinator 
required. No credit will be given for Elec 49 1 without completion of Elec 492. 

Johnson, D. 

492,S SENIOR HONORS PROJECTS (3) 

A two-semester sequence for individual projects supervised by a faculty member of the 
department. The portions of the first semester course (491) are devoted to group discussion of 
professional aspects of engineering: technical writing, engineering ethics, research protocols, 
patent considerations. A written proposal describing the project is required. Oral presentations 
throughout the year culminating in a final written report and in an oral, conference-style 
presentation. Senior standing in the department and permission of the course coordinator 
required. No credit will be given for Elec 491 without completion of Elec 492. 

Johnson, D. 

496,F ROBOTICS LABORATORY (10 1) 

Computer vision experiments, programming a mobile robot and an industrial-type PUMA robot, 
operating a CNC mill and an industrial-size CNC lathe, projects. 

Cheatham Jr., J. 

498,F INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS (3 3) 

A survey of topics in robotics including kinematics, dynamics and control theory applied to 
robotics. Lectures are given on image processing and computer vision, voice synthesis and 
speech recognition, artificial intelligence, and computer robot simulation. Laboratory includes 
programming of Microbot and PUMA robotic arms. 

Cheatham Jr., J. 

501,S LINEAR SYSTEM THEORY (3 3) 

Realization theory. Matrix Fraction description of linear multivariable systems. Stabilizability 
andcontrollerparametrization. Applications to regulator and decoupling problems. Prerequisite: 
Elec 301 or equivalent. 

Antoulas, A. 



292 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

502,S CONTROL SYSTEM SYNTHESIS (3-0-3) 

Optimal Synthesis of control systems using various norms. Stability robustness. Computa- 
tional solutions using state space methods. Prerequisite: Elec 501. 

Staff 

503,F ROBOTICS II (3-0-3) 

Study covering important aspects of recent research in kinematics, dynamics, and control of 
advanced robotic systems. To include redundant manipulators, dual and multiple armed 
systems, and multifingered grasping. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

504,S CONTROL OF ROBOTICS (3-0-3) 

Modeling of robots, kinematics, dynamics. Review of basic control methods. Approaches to 
robotic control, including linearization (featuring "computed torque') variable structure and 
adaptive control of manipulators. Prerequisite: Elec 501 or consent of instructor. 

Walker, I. 

505,S ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THRY (3-0-3) ' 

Boundary-value problems in electrostatics and magnetostatics. Propagation of electromagnetic 
waves. Time-varying fields. Wave guides and resonant cavaties. Not offered every year. 

Tittel,F. 

506,F APPLIED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THEORY (3-0-3) 

Basic plasma physics and gaseous electronics, laser-produced plasmas and their properties, 

fundamentals of controlled nuclear fusion. Not offered every year. 

Sauerbrey, R. 

507,F DYNAMICS OF NONLINEAR SYSTEMS (3-0-3) 

Analytical methods for analyzing nonlinear dynamical systems, including stability analysis via 
state space and describing function methods. Numerical methods for solving nonlinear ordinary 
differential equations are introduced, as well as methods for parameter estimation and sensitivity 
analysis. Techniques will be introduced for the study of the chaotic behavior of a variety of 
physical systems. Prerequisite: Elec 401 ,436, or equivalent. 

Clark Jr., J. 

519,S VLSI ALGORITHMS (3-0-3) 

Models of parallel computation. Design and analysis of parallel algorithms. VLSI complexity. 

Area-time tradeoffs. Areaefficient VLSI networks. Prerequisite: Elec 322. Also offered as Comp 

583. 

Varman,P. 



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520,F DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS (3 3-4) 

Distributed systems; workstations, local area networks, server machines. Multiprocess 
structuring and interprocess communication. File access and memory management. User 
interfaces: window systems and command interpreters. Case studies of selected distributed 
systems. Emphasis on performance aspects of system software design. Prerequisite: Elec 421, 
425. Also offered as Comp 520. 
fill. '.i«4*in.i<r ^ji'>^ ,,,.,ic Zwaenepael, W. 

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521,F ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (3 3 4) 

Techniques for simulating intelligent behavior by machine: problem solving, game playing, 
pattern perceiving, theorem proving, semantic information processing, and automatic program- 
ming. Prerequisite: Elec 322, Elec 331 or Masc 382. Also offered as Comp 440. 

Staff 



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293 



525,S ADVANCED COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE (3 3) 

Design issues of pipelined, vector, and multiprocessor architectures with emphasis on 
achieving high performance. Cache and virtual memory design. Techniques for exploiting 
parallelism. Prerequisite: Elec 425. Also offered as Comp 525. 

Sinclair. J.B. 

526,S COMPUTER NETWORKS DESIGN/ANALYSIS (3 3) 

Design and comparison of computer networks; techniques for performance analysis; connectiv- 
ity and reliability; capacity asignment. Network topologies. Local area networks, including 
rings, busses, and contention networks. Prerequisite: Elec 428. Also offered as Comp 526. 

Sinclair. J. 

529,S COMPUTER NETWORKS: ARCHITECTURE AND PROTOCOL (3 0^3) 

Introduction tocomputernetworks and computercommunication. Design of protocols forerror 
recovery, reliable delivery, routing and congestion control. Store-and-forward networks, 
satellite networks, local area networks, and locally distributed systems. Case studies of 
networks, protocols and protocol families. Emphasis on software design issues in computer 
communication. Prerequisite: Masc 382. Elec 42 1 . Also offered as Comp 529. 

Staff 

530,F DETECTION THEORY (3 3) 

Review of stochastic processes; Karhunen-Loeve expansion; transmission and reception of 
digital signals over a variety of channels; intersymbol interference and equalization. Additional 
topics varv from vear to vear in modem communication theorv. Prerequisite: Elec 430. Not 
offered 1992-93. ' 



531,F DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING (3 3) 

Analysis of discrete-time signals and systems. Design and implementation of digital filters. 
Efficient algorithms for the discrete Fourier transform and for convolution. Prerequisite: Elec 
401. a senior-level course in signals and linear systems. 

Biirriis, C. 

533,F INTRODUCTION TO RANDOM PROCESSES AND APPLICATIONS 

(3-0-3) 
Review of basic probability: Sequence of random variables; Random vectors and estimation: 
Basic concepts of random processes: Random processes in linear systems, expandion of random 
processes; Wienerfiltermg; Spectral representation of random processes; White-noise integrals. 
Also offered as Masc 58? Not offered 1991-92. 

Aazhan^. B. 

534,S ESTIMATION THEORY (3 3) 

See Masc 584 Prerequisite: Elec 430. Also offered as Masc 584 and Stat 584. 

Johnson. D H. 

535,S INFORMATION AND CODING THEORY (3 3) 

Introduction to information theory concepts; basic theorems of channel coding and source 
coding with afidelit) criterion Techniques of channel coding, parity check codes, introduction 
to algebraic coding theory, introduction to convoUmonal codes. Variable-length source 
coding. Prerequisite; Elec 33 1 or Masc 382. Also offered as Masc 585 and Stat 585. Not offered 
every year. Not offered 1991-92 

Aazhang. B. 



294 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

536,F CONTROL SYSTEMS II (3-0-3) 

A second course in feedback control system design in which the role of uncertainty is 
emphasized. The objective is to design feedback control systems that meet performance 
specifications in the presence of uncertainties such as disturbances, measurement noise and 
unmodelled plant dynamics. Prerequisite: Elec 436 or equivalent. 

Pearson, J. 

537,F INTRODUCTION TO ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (3-0-3) 
This course is intended to introduce the student with the fundamental problem solving techniques 
of Artificial Intelligence (AI). This will be achieved through intermixing of an introduction to 
Symbolic Manipulation (through LISP programming) and a presentation of selected current AI 
topics. Emphasis will be placed on expert systems, which are powerful engineering problem- 
solving tools. Enrollment limited to Seniors and Graduate students. Prerequisite: Intro comp and 
prob ability course. Also offered as Mech 537. 

Philippe, E. 

539,S DIGITAL IMAGE PROCESSING (3 0-3) 

Modem techniques in 2D- and 3D-image processing. Color imaging. Scene analysis and robotic 

vision. 

Wendt, R. 

560,F VLSI DESIGN I (3-4-4) 

A study of VLSI technology and design. MOS devices, characteristics and fabrication. Logic 
design and implementation. VLSI design methodology, circuit simulation and verification. 
Course includes group design projects. Students are required to enroll in Elec 56 1 VLSI Design 
II in the following semester. Prerequisite: Elec 326. 

Cavallaro, J. 

561,S VLSI DESIGN II (1-3-1) 

Testing and evaluation of VLSI circuits designed in VLSI Design I, Elec 560. Prerequisite: Elec 
560. 

Cavallaro, J. 

562,F MICROWAVE ENGINEERING (3-3-4) .-^ - — 

Waveguides and resonant cavities. Scattering matrix, application to two-, three-, and four-port 
devices. Broadband transformers, couplers, and filters. Microwave generation. Tensor 
susceptibility and nonreciprocal devices. Prerequisite: Elec 306. 

Staff 

563,F INTRODUCTION TO SOLID STATE PHYSICS I (3-0-3) 

Fundamental concepts of crystalline solids, including crystal structure, band theory of electrons, 

and lattice vibration theory. Also offered as Phys 563. 

Rau. C. 

564,S INTRODUCTION TO SOLID STATE PHYSICS H (3-0-3) 

Continuation of Elec 563, including scattering of waves by crystals, transport theory, and 

magnetic phenomena. Also offered as Phys 564. 

Nor lander, P. 



'y_: ■.■■! :....;: 295 

580S NEURONAL MODELING (3-0-3) 

This course introduces the mathematical techniques employed in modeling neurons and 
neuronal systems. It begins with a review of membrane ion channel kinetics and rapidly 
progresses to the mathematical characterization of various parts of the neuron (soma, axon and 
dendritic tree). Both vertebrate and invertebrate neuron models are considered; models of 
axonal conduction, as well as volume conduction in the medium surrounding the axon are 
discussed. Neuron models exhibiting pacing and bursting activity will be given particular 
attention. The course will include guest lectures in selected application areas. Prerequisite: 
ELEC 481, 507 or equivalent. 

Clark Jr.. J. 

581,F CARDIOVASCULAR DYNAMICS (3-4-4) 

Analysis of the properties and function of the cardiovascular system, including a detailed study 
of cardiac electrophysiology, ventricular mechanics, arterial hemodynamics, coronary and 
cerebral circulations, heart rate control, imaging methods for determining ventricular volume and 
output flow. Therapeutic devices such as mechanical circulatory-assist and total replacement 
devices will be studied as well as computer-controlled drug delivery systems. Mathematical 
models of many of these systems will be considered. As part of the course requirements the 
student will complete an internship project with an engineer of life scientist working in the Texas 
Medical Center. Prerequisite: Elec 481, 482, 507 or equivalent. Not offered every year. 

Clark Jr., J. 

590,F/S SPECIAL PROJECTS (Variable) 

Theoretical and experimental investigations under staff direction. 

Stajf 

591^ OPTICS (3-0-3) 

Survey covering important aspects of classical optical theory, wave properties of light, and the 
Fourier analysis approach to physical optics. Holography, integrated optics, and fiber optics. 
Not offered 1992-93. 

Rabson, T. 

592,S TOPICS IN QUANTUM OPTICS (3-0-3) 

Latest developments in lasers, optical pumping, Raman and Brillouin spectroscopy, and mode 

locking. 

Young. J. 

594,S SEMINAR IN BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING (3-0 3) 
A seminar focusing on specific areas of biomedical research, and involving students and faculty 
from other universities in the Houston area. The course is under the sponsorship of the Houston 
Biomedical Engineering Society and exposes students to an intense treatment of a specific 
biological system from several scientific and engineering viewpoints. Graduate students in 
chemical, electrical, and mechanical engineering are particularly encouraged to take this course. 

Staff 

602,S OPTOELECTRONICS (3-0-3) 

This is a broad survey course designed to cover the most current research directions in 

optoelectronics, photonics, and ultrafast measurement technology. 

Halas. N. 

625,F HIGH PERFORMANCE PROCESSOR DESIGN (3 3) 

An advanced course in microprocessor architecture and implementation. The course will 
require a major design project. Prerequisite; Elec 525, 560, and 426; Elec 424 recommended. 
Enrollment is limited. Permission of instructor required. 

Bennet. J.K. 



296 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

632,S SPEECH SIGNAL PROCESSING (3-0 3) Jnr»*/ f*vfnqiiiwr 

Acoustic models of speech production. Pitch and format structure of speech. Estimation of 
speech spectra: short-time Fourier analysis, filter banks, homomorphic signal processing, auto- 
regressive models. Pitch detection. Vocoding algorithm: channel vocoders, homomorphic 
vocoders, linear predictive vocoders. Prerequisite: Elec 531. 
..o„v..„ ......... Staff 

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691,S SEMINAR-QUANTUM ELECTRONICS (1-0-1) 

Sauerbrey. /?., Smayling, M^ 



692,S MICROWAVE ENGINEERING (Variable) 
Not offered 1992-93. 



Staff 



693,F ADVANCED TOPICS-COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3 3) ; 

May be repeated for credit. , 

Varman, P., 



694,S ADVANCED TOPICS-COMPUTER SYSTEMS (3 3) 

May be repeated for credit. 



Sinclair. J.B. 



695,F ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMMUNICATIONS AND STATISTICAL r 

SIGNAL PROCESSING (3 0-3) 
Advanced topics which vary from year to year. Not offered every year. 

I c.- Aazhang, BZ 

696,S DIGITAL SIGNAL PROCESSING (3-0-3) 

Advanced topics in digital signal process: time varying systems, multidimensional signal 
processing, and other topics of current interest. Individual projects are a part of this course. 

Burrus, C. 

697,S ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMMUNICATIONS AND STATISTICAL 

SIGNAL PROCESSING (3-0-3) 
Advanced topics which vary from year to year. Not offered every year. 
>.--.cL.u'»..u, ..:. .:>. .- Eggers.M. 

698,S ADVANCED TOPICS IN ROBOTICS (3 3) 

Not offered every year. 



760,F/S BAYLOR/RICE/MD/PhD PROGRAM 

Departmental permission required. 

800,F/S RESEARCH AND THESIS (Variable) 



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Cheatham. Jr.. J. 



Staff 
Staff 



:i..: '';...• -• ^;^• 297 
English 



.;; . Professor Skura, Chair 

Professors Apple, Chance, Doody, Doughtie, Driskiil, Grob, Huston, Isle 
) ^ Meixner, Minter, Morris, Patten, Piper, Skura, Snow, Wood 
Visiting Mellon Professor K, Klein 
' '*- ^ r r Associate Professor Michie 

Assistant Professors Derrick, Fultz, Lamos, and Lurie 
Lecturers Daichman, Logan, Recknagel, Tobin, and Wallingford 

Degrees Offered: B.A.,M. A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. A major in English requires 36 semester hours in 
Enghsh; at least 24 semester hours must be courses at or above the 300 level. A double 
major requires 30 semester hours in English, vv'ith at least 18 hours at the advanced 
level. All English majors must take two semesters of Major British Writers (English 
251, 252) and Introduction to the Study of American Literature (English 261) as 
preparatory surveys. Humanities 101 and 102 may be counted as credit toward the 
major. 

An English major must also take advanced courses in the following categories: 
( 1 ) three semester hours in English literature before 1 800; (2) three semester hours in 
English literature after 1800; (3) three semester hours in American literature. 

It is recommended that all English majors take some formal instruction in English 
and American history and, if they plan to do graduate work, at least six semester hours 
at the advanced level in a foreign language. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must also 
satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours 
outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 semester 
hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-90. 

The Graduate Program. The graduate program m English is designed for 
thorough training of a limited number of carefully selected students. Rice offers the 
Ph.D. to students interested in all fields of British and American literature and in 
literary theory. 

As a part of their training, graduate students are expected to participate in the 
research and teaching activities of the department. 

Within the limits of available funds, graduate scholarships and fellowships are 
awarded to qualified students. Scholarships provide a waiver of tuition; fellowships 
include a stipend and a waiver of tuition. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts. While the English Department 
does not have an M.A. program, it does offer the M.A. under two circumstances: 1 ) 
to Ph.D. students in the process of obtaining their doctorate after official admission to 
candidacy for the Ph.D. and 2) to Ph.D. students who decide to leave the program 
before completing their doctorate. Students admitted to the graduate program may 
take the master's degree by meeting four requirements: 

1 . If they have not done so before entering the program, they must satisfactorily 
complete at least three semester hours at the junior or senior level in the 
literature of a foreign language, not in translation, either at Rice or another 
accredited institution. 



298 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

2. They must satisfactorily complete at least 24 semester hours of graduate 
work in English, exclusive of the thesis. 

3. They must fulfill distribution requirements by taking at least one course in 
each of five of the following fields: 1) Medieval Literature, 2) Renaissance 
Literature to 1600 (including Shakespeare), 3) Seventeenth- or Eighteenth- 
Century British Literature, 4) Nineteenth-Century British Literature, 5) 

y;(. Twentieth-Century British Literature, 6) American Literature to 1900, 7) 
Twentieth-Century American Literature, 8) Literary Theory. 

4. They must complete a thesis of approximately 50 pages and must defend it 
in an oral examination. For students admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. 
degree, the requirement of a thesis will be waived. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Candidates for the 
doctoral degree must complete five requirements: 

1 . If they have not done so before entering the program, they must satisfactorily 
complete at least six semester hours at the junior or senior level in the 
literature of a foreign language, not in translation, either at Rice or another 
accredited institution. 

2. They must satisfactorily complete at least 48 semester hours of course work 
in English, exclusive of the thesis, including a three-hour pedagogy course. 

3. They must fulfill distribution requirements by taking at least one course in 
each of the following fields: 1) Medieval Literature, 2) Renaissance Litera- 
ture to 1 600 (including Shakespeare), 3) Seventeenth- or Eighteenth-Century 
British Literature, 4) Nineteenth-Century British Literature, 5) Twentieth- 
Century British Literature, 6) American Literature to 1900, 7) Twentieth- 
Century American Literature, 8) Literary Theory. 

4. They must pass a six-hour written preliminary examination conducted by 
two departmental faculty members. The exam may focus on (a) one of seven 
traditional literary periods (1) Medieval, 2) Renaissance, 3) British Litera- 
ture 1660-1880, 4) Nineteenth-Century British Literature, 5) Twentieth- 
Century British Literature, 6) American Literature to 1900, 7) Twentieth- 
Century American Literature); (b) a theoretical tradition or topic; or (c) a 
combination of a traditional literary period or portion of a period and a 

10^ ; theoretical topic or topics or a genre. In special cases the preliminary 
examination may be interdisciplinary in focus. 

5. They must complete a dissertation which demonstrates a capacity for 
independent work of high quality in either traditional scholarship, critical 

•jHt : interpretation, or critical theory; and they must pass an oral examination on 
the thesis and related fields. 

In order to qualify for continuing financial aid, students must be approved for 
candidacy for the Ph.D. by the beginning of the seventh semester at Rice (fifth semester 
for those entering with an M.A.). To secure approval, they must satisfy the foreign 
language requirement, fulfill the distribution requirements, pass the preliminary 
examination, and have a dissertation prospectus approved by the department's 
graduate studies committee. 



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,-; , .. 299 

English Courses 

101,F CRITICAL READING AND WRITING (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Analysis and discussion of literary texts: poetry, drama, prose, fiction. Students submit essays 
frequently. All students must submit section preference sheets to the English Dept. 

Staff 

102,S CRITICAL READING AND WRITING (3 3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Continuation of Engl 101, with sections giving special emphasis to individual genres: fiction, 
drama, and poetry. All students must submit section preference sheets to the English Depart- 
ment. 

Staff 

103,F BASIC COMPOSITION (3 3) , 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Intended primarily for students whose English Competency Examination is below standard. 
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Driskill. L. 

104,S BASIC COMPOSITION (3 3) 

See Engl 103. Permission of instructor is required. 

. ... •,' - : . ■ :: Staff 

211,F/S INTRO. TO CREATIVE WRITING (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Discussion and analysis of student fiction and poetry. Permission of instructor is required. 

Staff 

251,F MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS: CHAUCER TO 1800 (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Readings in British major authors of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the eighteenth 
century. Required of English majors. Enrollment in each section limited. Turn in preference sheet 
to English Office. 

Piper, W., Chance, J., Snow, E. 

252,S MAJOR BRITISH WRITERS: 1800 TO PRESENT (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Readings in major British authors of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Required of English 
majors. Enrollment in each section limited. Turn in preference sheet to English Office. 

Logan. T., Michie, H., Patten, R. 

261,F/S INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

(3-0-3) 
*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 
Required of English majors. Enrollment limited. 

Minter, D. 

302,F/S BALLAD AND FOLKSONG (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

About two-thirds of this course is devoted to British and American folk ballads; the rest surveys 
American folk lyrics, spirituals, work songs, and blues. 

Doughtie, E. 

303,F AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: THE MOTHER/DAUGHTER 
PLOT 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

A survey of major literary works by African-Americans. 

Full- L. 



300 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

303,S AFRICAN-AMERICAN LITERATURE: BLACK WOMEN WRFTERS 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE CATEGORY 1.1 

A survey of major literary works by African- Americans. r'^; » '5] ' * '^U' JiJ 



304,F/S 20TH-CENTURY WOMEN WRITERS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Readings in modem women novelists or modem women poets. 



311,F FICTION WRITING (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Discussion and analysis of student fiction. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



312,S FICTION WRITING (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

See Engl 311. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



Fullz. L. 



Lurie, S. 



Apple. M. 



Apple. M. 



3I3,F/S DRAMATIC WRITING (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

The emphasis, depending on individual students, will be on the writing of drama in one of several 
of the chief modes of the performing arts: plays, films, musicals, opera, even dance. Prerequisite: 
permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

Meixner. J. 

314,F/S POETRY WRITING (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Extensive reading in modem poetry as well as regular practice in the writing of various forms will 
be required. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. 

Wood. S.. Prospere. S. 

315,S EXPOSITORY WRITING (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

A course in the composition of personal essays. Prerequisite: permission of instmctor. 

Piper, W. 

317,S TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION (3-0-3) 

Dn skill. L. 

320,S INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL CULTURE (3 3 ) 

Interdisciplinary course providing insights into the literature, art, philosophy, history, music, 
science, and cuisine of the Middle Ages, with guest lectures by specialists in various fields, slide 
lectures, and field trips. Also offered as Humanities 320. 

Chance. J. 

321,F OLD ENGLISH: GENDER AND POWER (3-0-3) 

An examination of the charms. " Wulf and Eadwacer," "The Wife's Lament," "Judith," "Beowulf 

and related texts in the original and in translation. 

Chance. J. 

323,F/S CHAUCER (3-0-3) ^noiAio^ 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Readings in the Canterbury Tales and other writings of Chaucer. 

' . ' .■ '.ii^-'^KyiA'AiChancerd. 

TOJ*I 
I.l Yil003TAD :32flU03 WOITUaiflTZia * 
.>5nBoh3mA-n£3iVtA i(d zjIiow ^(isisjil lotsm \o ^9\nu2 A 



301 

328,S MIDDLE ENGLISH LITERATURE (3-0 3) ' > 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Mythology in medieval literature: misogyny, literacy, and myth. 

Chance. J. 

329,S 16TH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

A survey focusing on the nondramatic works of Shakespeare, Sidney, Spenser, and their 
contemporaries. 

Klein. K. 

334,F ELIZABETHAN AND JACOBEAN DRAMA (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Close critical reading of Elizabethan and Jacobean plays with particular emphasis on the works 
of Marlowe and Jonson. 

Klein. K. 

339,F SHAKESPEARE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Representative plays including tragedies, comedies, histories, and romances will be read. 

Grob. A. 

340,S SHAKESPEARE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

See Engl 339. Limited to juniors and seniors only. 

Huston. J.D.. Skura. M. 

343,S 17TH-CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Poetry and prose of the seventeenth century, excluding Milton. 



344,F/S MILTON (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Major poems and prose of John Milton. 



Snow. E. 



Snow. E. 



346,S BRITISH LITERATURE 1660-1800 (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Major writers of the eighteenth century, with particular attention given to Swift, Pope, and 
Johnson. 

Piper. W. 

351,F/S BRITISH LITERATURE-ROMANTIC PERIOD (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

The major writings of Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. 

Grab. A. 

357,S VICTORIAN LITERATURE (3-0 3) ] ;^ 7 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

The poetry of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Meredith, the Pre-Raphaelites and Hopkins; the 
prose of Carlyle, Ruskin, Pater, Arnold, and Mill. 

.: . '.■';■- ■ .; , • ; Grab, A. Michie. H.. Patten, R. 

361,F 18TH-CENTURY BRITISH FICTION (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

A course dealing chiefly in the novels of Fielding, Sterne, Smollett, and Austen. 

Piper. W. 



302 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

362,F 19TH-CENTURY BRITISH FICTION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

The novel from Austen to Hardy. 

Michie,H., Patten, R. 

363,F/S 20TH-CENTURY BRITISH FICTION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Forster, Woolf, Lawrence, Joyce, and their contemporaries. Particular attention will be given to 
Ulysses. 

Doody, T. 

364,F 20TH-CENTURY BRITISH POETRY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Survey from 1890 to the present: emphasis on Hopkins, Yeats, Lawrence, Graves, Auden, 
Larkin, and Hughes. 

Wallingford, K. 

367,F MODERN DRAMA: IBSEN TO 1940 (3 0-3) """ * ^*'^'^^ ' ^ 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Plays by Ibsen, Chekhov, Strindberg, Wilde, Shaw, Synge, O'Casey, Pirandello, and T.S. Eliot. 

Meixner, J. 

368,S MODERN DRAMA: 1940 TO PRESENT (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

O'Neill, Miller, and Williams; French modems; absurdism and recent trends. 

Meixner, J. 

369,F THE EUROPEAN NOVEL: CERVANTES TO 1900 (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 " - ,V,' 
Major European fiction from Cervantes to Tolstoy in translation. '^ '"'" ^" 

-.3 .'inr. Doody, T., Patten, R. 

'' f . ' ■ . \. ■ I ',<■ " , _- •..'.''■. 

370,S THE NOVEL IN THE 20TH CENTURY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Major European and Latin American fiction of the twentieth century in translation. 

Doody, T., Isle, W. 

378,F AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1860 (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville, Hawthorne, Whitman, and other American writers. 

Derrick. S. 

379,S AMERICAN LITERATURE: 1860-1910 (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

A study of Mark Twain, Emily Dickinson, Stephen Crane, Henry James, and others. 

Derrick, S. 

383,F/S AMERICAN FICTION: 1910-1940 (3 3) ^^ ^ , 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 
Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, and their contemporaries. 

'Morris, W. 

384,S AMERICAN FICTION: 1940 TO PRESENT (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Survey with emphasis on the work of Bellow, Mailer, Barth, and Pynchon!'Lirnited to juniors 
and seniors only. 

' ^ Staff 



>. . -^ 303 

3874^ 20TH-CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Frost, Pound, Eliot, and Stevens with some attention to the other poets of the twentieth century. 

Lamos, C. 

388,S CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN POETRY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

American poetry since Lowell. 



394,F/S STRUCTURE OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 
Also offered as Ling 394. 



3954^ HISTORY OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.4 
Also offered as Ling 395. 



Doody, T. 



Staff 



Mitchell, E.D. 



396,S LANGUAGE AND PHILOSOPHY IN LITERATURE (3-0-3) 
* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Readings and discussions of issues in the philosophy of language. 



Morris, W. 



3994^ LITERARY CRITICISM: HISTORY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

A survey of the history of literary criticism from Plato to the twentieth century. 

400,F/S LITERARY CRITICISM: THEORY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 
Recent developments in critical theory. 



Morris, W. 



Morris, W. 



401,F TOPICS IN LITERATURE: THE CFTY (3-0-3) 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Limited to 25 students. 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 



Doody, T. 



401,S TOPICS IN LITERATURE: MODERN DRAMA ON FILM & IN 

PERFORMANCE (3-0-3) 
*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Limited to 25 students. .- - : t 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. . ' " . . ', 

Huston, J.D. 

402,S TOPICS IN LITERATURE: LITERATURE AND THE VISUAL ARTS 

(3-0-3) , . ., ., 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY LI ' s -' " \;, , 

Limited to 25 students. . .., . 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Snow, E. 



304 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

403,F STUDIES IN MAJOR BRITISH AUTHORS: MILTON (3-0-3) l"^^- 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Limited to 25 students. 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Snow, E. 

404,S TOPICS IN LITERATURE: RENAISSANCE DRAMA AND DRA- 
MATIC THEORY (3-0-3) *- — ^ -"- ^" 

*D1STR1BUT10N COURSE CATEGORY 1. 1 

405, 406 STUDIES IN A MAJOR AMERICAN AUTHOR (3-0-3 each semester) 
* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

The topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. 

Staff 

407,S STUDIES IN LITERARY TYPES: DANTE IN TRANSLATION (3-0-3) 

*DISTR1BUT10N COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

The topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit. 

Bradley, A. 

(f-r n -^ijiiiTAHimj wf YH<i05?0.nH<i ai/fA .lOAUO/ 'K 

408,S STUDIES IN LITERARY TYPES: U.S. POETRY OF THE 1%0S (3-0-3) ' 

WaUingford, K? 

411,F STUDIES IN MODERN LITERATURE: JOYCE AND WOOLF (3-0-3) 
*DISTR1BUT10N COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Lamos, C. 

412,S STUDIES IN MODERN LITERATURE: EMBODIMENT IN CON- 

TEMPORARY PERFORMANCE (3-0-3) >r-)rnJI') YHASI'ITI i^ 

*DISTR1BUT10N COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 \'yaZS[lKnV^^ 

The topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credit ; ..-;}„-, „ ,,„. . a 

Thompson, D. 

413,F STUDIES IN LITERARY CRITICISM: FEMINIST LITERARY 

THEORY (3-0-3) O ■32mJ03 / 

^DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

414 STUDIES IN LITERARY CRITICISM (3-0-3) 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 . .nj'/!18'"* '^ 

The topics vary from year to year. May be repeated for credk^n ? » '^I'^Vl/ 

^." ,' Morris.W. 

415 ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING: POETRX (3-Qt3) , , .^. ^.^ 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 ,, ^ 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. ' " *^ 

ITA5I3TIJ MI ^^vli ^^''^ ^ 

416,F,S ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION (3-0-3) 
♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. ,<! 

Apple, M. 

421,F DIRECTED READING (3-0-3) 

Skura, M. 



- : - : •: 305 

422,S DIRECTED READING (3-0-3) y i: r 



-nc' 



Skura. M. 



423,F SENIOR THESIS (3-0-3) 

Skura, M. 

424,S SENIOR THESIS (3-0 3) 

Skura, M. 

501,F BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0-3) 

Directed reading in a topic in British or American literature or literary theory. Graduate 

students may enroll for up to two semesters of directed reading for graduate credit. 

Staff 

502,S SEMINAR: NEW APPROACHES TO CHAUCER AND THE 14TH 

CENTURY (3-0-3) ...... 

Chance. J. 

510,S SEMINAR: FEMINIST THEORY (3-0-3) 

Lurie, S. 

51 1,F SEMINAR: INTERPRETATION AND AMERICAN LITERATURE 

(3-0-3) 

M inter, D. 

511,S SEMINAR: FAULKNER AND MODERN THEORY (3-0 3) 

Morris, W. 

512,F SEMINAR: 18TH-CENTURY POETRY AND SATIRE (3-0-3) 

Piper. W. 

5 13,F SEMINAR: ROMANTIC LITERATURE: WORDSWORTH AND 

KEATS (3-0-3) 

Grab. A. 

513,S SEMINAR: 19TH-CENTURY WOMEN NOVELISTS & THE MALE 
TRADITION (3-0 3) 

Derrick, S. 

514,F SEMINAR: ALTERNATIVE SHAKESPEARES: RACE, CLASS & 
GENDER IN EARLY MODERN ENGLAND (3 3) 

Skura, M. 

5I5,F SEMINAR: PEDAGOGY (3-0 3) 

Patten, R 

516,F SEMINAR: MODERN LITERATURE (3 3) 

Staff 

517,F SEMINAR: CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO COMPOSITION 

(3-0-3) 

Driskill, L. 

517,S SEMINAR: VICTORIAN NOVEL: GEORGE ELIOT & THOMAS 

HARDY (3-0-3) 

Michie. H. 



306 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

518,S SEMINAR: TOM MORRISON & PAULE MARSHALL (3-0-3) 



522,S SEMINAR: HLM THEORY AND LITERATURE (3-0-3) 

622,S DIRECTED READING (3-0-3) 

621,F DIRECTED READING (3-0-3) 

701^ BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0-3) 

:«fHA 'H'AV RAY 
702,F BRITISH AND AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0-3) 



Fultz. L. 

Snow, E. 
Skura, M. 
Skura, M. 
Skura, M. 
Skura, M. 



703,F RESEARCH LEADING TO CANDIDACY (Variable) 

Topics in British and American Literary theory. To be taken after a student has completed 
departmental course requirements for the Master's or Doctorate, and before being admitted to 
candidacy. -., . .^^i-.^^^^j- 



704,S RESEARCH LEADING TO CANDIDACY (Variable) 

800,F/S PH.D. RESEARCH AND THESIS (Variable) 
To be taken after a student has been admitted to candidacy. 



Skura, M. 



Skura, M. 



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307 

Environmental Science and Engineering 
The George R. Brown School of Engineering 



Professor P.B. Bedient, C/ra/r 
, ^ Professors Few, Tomson, and Ward 

, Adjunct Professors Raymond, Schaezler, and Wilson 

Adjunct Associate Professor Pier 
rt- V Assistant Professors Hughes and Wiesner 

Lecturer Blackburn 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.E.E., M.E.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. The major in environmental science (offered only as 
a double major with other fields of science or engineering) is intended for students 
wishing academic training oriented toward the solution of technical environmental 
problems and leads to the B.A. degree. 

General requirements during the first two years include: two years of mathemat- 
ics, one and one-half years of chemistry, and one year of physics. Specific courses to 
satisfy these requirements vary somewhat and should be determined in consultation 
with a departmental advisor. For the B.A. degree, a minimum of 1 2 semester hours of 
environmental science and engineering courses are required during the junior and 
senior years. The total number of semester hours required for the B.A. with a double 
major depends on department requirements for the other major. Generally, however, 
in addition to the department requirements for the majors, students must also satisfy 
the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours outside 
the department requirements for a total program of at least 120 semester hours. See 
Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-90. 

Undergraduates interested in environmental engineering should contact the 
Departments of Civil Engineering and Chemical Engineering for information on the 
B.S. degree program with an environmental option. 

Graduate Programs. Graduate programs in the department of Environmental 
Science and Engineering lead to the degrees of Master of Environmental Engineering 
(M.E.E.), Master of Environmental Science (M.E.S.), Master of Science (M.S.) and 
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). Applicants for graduate study in the department of 
Environmental Science and Engineering are expected to have at least a "B" (3.0) 
average in undergraduate work, and high GRE scores in the verbal, quantitative, and 
analytical sections of the exam. University requirements for the advanced degrees are 
presented on pages 000-000. 

Master's Programs. The M.E.E. and M.E.S. degrees are professional non-thesis 
degrees requiring one year of study. To enter the M.E.S. program, applicants must 
have successfully completed a four-year curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
(B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in any of the natural or physical sciences. 
Completion of a four-year curriculum leading to the Bachelor of Science in any field 
of engineering qualifies the student for possible admission to the M.E.E. program. 
While the M.E.S. and M.E.E. degree programs are open to all qualified applicants, 
these degrees are typically awarded to persons completing undergraduate programs in 
environmental science or environmental engineering who wish to extend their educa- 
tion into a fifth year of specialized study. 



308 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Most of the graduate students admitted for study towards a Master's degree pursue 
a thesis program culminating in the degree of Master of Science (M.S.) in Environ- 
mental Science and Engineering. Candidates for the M.S. degree must complete a 
minimum of eight approved semester courses and present and defend, in oral 
examination, a research thesis. A set of four core courses in the areas of environmental 
chemistry, water and wastewater treatment, hydrology, and environmental modeling 
are required of all M.S. candidates. Comparable coursework completed previously by 
the candidate may be substituted for core courses. Normally, two academic years and 
the intervening summer are required for the degree. In conjunction with the candidate's 
research advisor, the student will select an M.S. advisory committee. The M.S. 
advisory committee consists of the candidate's research advisor, one or two additional 
members from the environmental science and engineering (ES&E) faculty, plus at 
least one member from another department. Individuals from other institutions 
(academic, business and/or governmental) may also serve on the thesis advisory 
committee, but they may not substitute for any of the Rice faculty positions specified 
above. The advisory committee is normally established by mutual agreement between 
the student and the research advisor, with approval of the Department Chair. It is the 
responsibility of the student to secure the consent of faculty members to serve on the 
thesis advisory committee. Students are advised to discuss their progress with 
committee members as their work evolves. Students will be allowed to take an oral 
examination on their thesis only after their thesis advisory committee has determined 
that the thesis is in an acceptable written format for a public defense. 

The Doctoral Program. Candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy must: 
(1) complete a rigorous list of approved courses with high standing. (2) pass a 
preliminary written examination to evaluate preparation for doctoral studies in the 
field of Environmental Science and Engineering, (3) pass a qualifying examination on 
course, proposed research, and related topics, (4) complete a dissertation indicating 
the candidate's ability to do original research, and (5) pass a formal public oral 
examination on the thesis and related topics. 

Successful completion of at least 90 semester hours of course work and research 
beyond the Bachelor's degree are required for the Ph.D. University residency require- 
ments also include at least four semesters of full time study at Rice. Doctoral 
candidates typically take the written and oral preliminary exams after one to two 
semesters of course work in the department. This exam is administered by the ES&E 
faculty. Candidates who pass the preliminary exam will be allowed to form a doctoral 
committee. The doctoral committee consists of no less than three members of the Rice 
University faculty. The candidates research advisor chairs the doctoral committee and 
at least one member of the committee must be from a department other than ES&E. 
After the doctoral candidate has formed a committee and developed a 
proposal for doctoral research, the candidate must pass a qualifying examination 
administered by the doctoral committee. The purpose of the qualifying examination 
is to evaluate the candidate's preparation for his or her proposed research and to 
identify any areas requiring additional course work or study. 



'■'■' ■ ■ '-■ 309 

Environmental Science and Engineering 

Environmental Science and Engineering Courses . < 

201,F INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (3 3 4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

Chemical, physical, and biological components of the environment and the effects of pollution 

on their maintenance and utilization. Also offered as Heal 201 . 

-v ■> ..v.... .<- ..,■.,.._.-.- ■. Ward.C. 

401,F INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY (3-3-4) 
Fundamental principles of environmental chemistry and measurements. Additional lab. 

Tomson, M. 

403,F WATER AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT (3 3) 

Fundamental principles of water and wastewater treatment systems and their application to the 
design and operation of treatment plants. 

-'''-■ Staff 

406,S INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL LAW (3-0-3) 
Legal techniques used by societies to plan and regulate the use of environmental resources. 

Blackburn, J. 

412,S HYDROLOGY AND WATERSHED ANALYSIS (3-3-4) 

Fundamentals of the hydrologic cycle, hydrograph techniques, flood routing, and open channel 

flow; local watershed application and laboratory. Also offered as Civi 464. 

Bedient. P. 

443,F INTRODUCTION TO ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE (3 0-3) 

Fundamentals of meteorology, climatology, and predictive meteorology and climatology. Also 

offered as Space 443 and Mech 477. 

•'■ Few. A. 

445,F NATURAL ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS IN COMMUNITY 

DEVELOPMENT (3 0-3) 
Readings, discussion, and review of data sources on natural environmental factors affecting 
and affected by the development of the built environment. Also offered as Arch 345 and 645. 

Blackburn, J. 

490,F/S SPECIAL STUDY AND RESEARCH (Variable) 

Open to environmental science or engineering majors with permission of chairman. Written 
thesis required. 

Staff 

511,F ENVI PHYSIOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY (3-0 3) 

Physical and chemical environment as it affects the physiology and population dynamics of 
organisms (including humans). Stability and maintenance of biogeochemical cycles. (University 
of Texas School of Public Health) Available to graduate students only. 

Staff 

512,S ENVI PHYSIOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY (3 0-3) 

See Envi 511. (University of Texas School of Public Health ) Available to graduate students only . 

Staff 

518,F GROUND WATER HYDROLOGY (3 3) 

Ground water hydrology, hydrogeology. well mechanics, hydraulics. Pollutant transport in 
aquifer systems, numerical methods, and ground water models. 

Bedieni. P. 



3 10 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

530,S PHYSICAL-CHEMICAL PROCESSES IN ENVIRONMENTAL 

ENGINEERING (3-0-3) 
Principles of colloid and surface chemistry, mixing, particle aggregation, settling, packed bed 
filtration, adsorption, ion exchange, gas transfer, membrane processes, chemical oxidation and 
disinfection in the context of water and waste treatment. 

Wiesner, M. 

534,F TRANSPORT PHENOMENA AND ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING 

(3-0-3) 
Principles of fluid flow, mass transport and transformation processes in natural and engineered 
systems. Applications of reactor engineering, chemical and biological reaction kinetics to 
environmental systems modeling including streams, lakes, estuaries, and the atmosphere. 

Wiesner, M. 

536,S BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT (3-0-3) 

Theory and application of biochemical processes in environmental engineering. 

^' • Staff 

550,S APPLIED WATER CHEMISTRY (3-0-3) 

Designed to provide a theoretical basis for considering the chemistry of natural and waste waters 

and treatment processes. 

Tomson, M. 

564,S ATMOSPHERIC DYNAMICS (3-0 3) 

Hydrodynamic equations of motion on a rotating planet solved for static, and perturbed and 
instable flows for mesoscale and macroscale weather systems on earth and other planets. Also 
offered as Space 564. 

Few, A. 

590,F/S M.E.E. AND M.E.S. SPECIAL STUDY AND RESEARCH (Variable) 
Independent investigation of a specific topic or problem in environmental engineering under 
the direction of a selected faculty member. Preparation of a formal report and an oral 
presentation of results are required. 

fcrhour;. -■ staff 

601,F SEMINAR (3-0-3) 

Continuing seminar on environmental research. 

Staff 

602,S SEMINAR (3-0-3) 
SeeEnvi601. 

Staff 

630,F CHARACTERIZATION, TRANSPORT, AND TREATMENT OF 

PARTICLES IN WATER (3-0 3) 
Theory and methods for characterizing colloidal/particulate materials in water, particle 
transport in porous media and simple flows, particle aggregation, aggregate and deposit 
morphology, and other special topics. An advanced topics course; formal lecture and student 
projects. (Offered in alternate years). 

Wiesner. M. 

631,S WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS (3-0-3) 

Process interactions, optimal design, and other topics related to potable water supply, treat- 
ment, and distribuion. An advanced topics course; formal lecture and student projects. (Offered 
in alternate years). 

Wiesner. M. 



311 

634,S GROUND WATER TRANSPORT (2 0-2) 

Continuation of Envi 534. Ground water transport theory, water quality models, analytical and 
numerical techniques, computer applications. Formal lecture and student projects, literature 
review. An advanced topics course. 

Bedient, P. 

635,F WATER CHEMISTRY (Vainable) 

Formal lecture and assigned reading in topics such as redox kinetics and thermodynamics, 

absorption and desorption, and the associated mathematics. An advanced topics course. 

Tomson, M. 

636,S WATER CHEMISTRY (Variable) 

See Envi 635. 

Tomson, M. 

651,F M.S. RESEARCH AND THESIS (Variable) 

Stajf 

652,S M.S. RESEARCH AND THESIS (Variable) 

Stajf 

800,F/S PH.D. RESEARCH AND THESIS (Variable) 

Stajf 



312 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

French Studies 



Professor D. Nelson, Chairman 

Professors Alcover, Carrington, and Goux 

Associate Professors Aresu, Logan, and Wood 

Assistant Professors Harter and Sherman 

Lecturers Caflisch and Datta 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A.. Ph.D. 

French ,. 

Undergraduate Program. A major in French Studies requires a minimum of 30 
semester hours (ten courses) m upper level courses (300 or 40()) while a double major 
or an area major requires 24 semester hours (eight courses ) of upper level courses. The 
following courses are required unless the student is exempted by his or her major 
advisor: French 301, 302. 311. and 312. As many as two French courses taught in 
English may count toward a French major. Students who have taken French 3(X)- and 
40()-level courses (with the exception of those courses taught in English) cannot enroll 
simultaneously or afterwards in French 200-level courses for credit. Students with a 
diploma from French-speaking institutions must consult with the department before 
enrolling in courses. 

Students are urged to take some courses in fields closely related to French Studies, 
such as English, European history, and other European literatures. All majors and 
prospective majors must have their programs approved by one of the undergraduate 
advisors. In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must 
also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester 
hours outside the departmental requirements, for a total program of at least 120 
semester hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-90. Students who 
would like to complete the honors program in French should consult the department 
chairman or one of the undergraduate advisors concerning the requirements. 

Activities sponsored by the department to acquaint students with French language 
and culture include a weekly French Table which meets at lunch in one of the colleges. 
In addition, the Club Chouette organizes outings to French movies, sponsors guest 
lecturers, and in cooperation with the department helps to produce a play during the 
spring semester. Students who maintain at least a B average in two or more upper level 
French courses will be invited to join Theta chapter of the honorary Pi Delta Phi. 

The department encourages majors to spend time living and studying in a 
francophone country. The Alliance Fran^aise of Houston presents a summer scholar- 
ship of $2500 each year to a sophomore or junior for six weeks study in France. The 
Clyde Ferguson Bull Traveling Fellowship, awarded each year to a graduating senior 
with a major or double ma|or in French, permits the recipient to spend an entire year 
in France. Members of the department are available for discussion of the numerous 
programs of study and travel in France sponsored by both American and French 
institutions. Information about study abroad is also available in the Office of Academic 
Advising. 



313 

Graduate Programs. Admission to graduate study in French is granted each year 
to a limited number of qualified students. A distinguished undergraduate record in the 
study of French literature and a capacity for independent work are essential. The award 
of advanced degrees is not based solely on accumulation of credits or compliance with 
formal requirements. Candidates are expected to attain not just a wide general 
knowledge of French literature, but also to place this knowledge within a broad 
spectrum of cultural, historical, philosophical, and theoretical concerns. It is expected 
finally that all candidates demonstrate a near-native command of the French language. 
In most cases, two years will be required for the completion of work for the degree of 
Master of Arts. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1. Completion with satisfactory standing of 24 hours (beyond B.A.) in ad- 
vanced courses, plus thesis work (6 semester hours). 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one language other 
than French, approved by the department. 

3. Satisfactory performance on preliminary written and oral examinations in 
French on the works indicated on the reading list provided by the dep»artment. 

4. Completion of an acceptable thesis. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the thesis. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: 

1 . Completion with high standing of a program approved by the department. 
Normally, this will include 54 semester hours of course work, plus 36 hours 
for the thesis. For those already holding the degree of Master of Arts, the 
requirement would be 27 semester hours of course work plus 36 hours for the 
thesis. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in two languages other 
than French approved by the department. 

3. Satisfactory performance on a preliminary written and oral examination 
based on a list of required texts for all students. This list will include selected 

- . readings in French literature from all of the major periods, but also readings 
in what the department feels to be crucial texts in the domains of philosophy, 

V ..,, history, critical theory and aesthetics. The oral examination may be taken 
only after the successful completion of the written examination. The depart- 
ment will provide a precise guideline as to the content and orientation of the 

bfu-; r. Ph.D. examination, in the shape of a program of subjects. 

bm:ij\ Students have a choice between passing a preliminary examination in a 

second field of literature or taking at least one course in a closely related field 
approved by the graduate faculty. Maximum credit toward the Ph.D. degree 
for work in a "minor" field is limited to three hours. 
Note: Requirements 2 and 3 must be fulfilled one year before the submission 
of a dissertation. 

4. Completion of a dissertation approved by the department. The dissertation is 
expected to represent an original contribution. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the dissertation and 
related fields. 



314 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

French Courses ^ - ■ ■■■--■,.'. /\.- y.:^ ...o^.. -T 'ittisbj^iP 

101 JF/S ELEMENTARY FRENCH I (3- 1 -4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Equal emphasis given to reading, writing, speaking and understanding. Classroom activities 
supplemented by work in the language laboratory. NOTE: 102 must be completed to receive 
distribution credit for 101. 

Staff 

\{S2^IS ELEMENTARY FRENCH H (3- 1 -4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

For description see Fren 101. Prerequisite: French 101 or placement exam. 

Staff 

201,F/S INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I (3-0-3) ^^'''^^ ^^'^"^ 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Intense oral and written grammar review; literary and cultural readings serve as basis for class 
discussions and compositions. Prerequisite: Fren 102 or placement exam. 

Staff 

202,F/S INTERMEDIATE FRENCH n (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

For description see Fren 201. Prerequisite: Fren 201 or placement exam. 

Staff 

203 INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATION (3-0-3) 
Not offered regularly. 

Note that the upper level courses are organized according to content instead of by 
number. i;e, : „ > 

L ADVANCED LANGUAGE .sqab 9d»x«*&^o 

301 J/S ADVANCED FRENCH GRAMMAR (3-0-3) 

Intensive study of French grammar and syntax at the advanced level, with concentration on 
idiomatic structures for the language and written practice of contemporary French. Required for 
French majors. Prerequisite: Fren 202 or placement exam. 

Staff 

3024i'/S FRENCH PHONETICS (3-0-3) 

Contrastive analysis of the French sound system, including such key areas as diction and 
articulation of French speech, with emphasis on class as well as laboratory practice. Required 
for French majors. Prerequisite: Fren 202 or placement exam. 

Alcover 

303,S ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Active practice of composition, oral analysis, and discussion based upon the reading of texts on 
selected issues and problems in contemporary French society. Prerequisite: Fren 201 and 302 
or placement exam. 

Datta 

305 COMMERCIAL FRENCH (3-0-3) 

An introduction to career and to commercial French, this course will deal with the essential 
vocabulary and syntax specific to the language of French-speaking business. Prerequisite: 301 
and 302 or placement exam. 

Datta 



315 

401,F STYLISTICS AND TRANSLATION (3 3) ' ' 

Theory and practice of translation. Stylistic analysis and translation of modem texts from and 
into English. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisites: 301, 302, 312 and instructor's 
permission. 

Wood 

II. LITERATURE 

311,F/S INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE I (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Main currents in French literature from its beginning to the eighteenth century. Required for 
French majors. Lectures and discussions in French. Prerequisite: Fren 202 or placement exam. 

NehonlCarrington 

312,F/S INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LITERATURE H (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Main currents in French literature from the nineteenth century to the present. Required for 
French majors. Lectures and discussions in French. Prerequisite: Fren 202 or placement exam. 

Carrington, Aresu 

410 SAINTS AND SINNERS (LITERATURE AND CULTURE OF THE 

MIDDLE AGES) (3 0-3) 
Study of the major genres of medieval French literature in their historical and intellectual 
context. Texts will include La Chanson de Roland, the lais of Marie de France, Le Chevalier de 
la Charrete, all in modem French translation. Prerequisites: 30 1 and 3 1 1 or placement exam. 

Nelson 

415 COURTLY LOVE IN MEDIEVAL FRANCE (3 0-3) 

Prerequisites: 301, 302, 311. See 515. 

Nelson 

425 FRENCH HUMANISM (3 3) 

Cultural, historical, intellectual, and literary traditions from Villon through Montaigne. 
Prerequisite: 311 or placement exam. 

Carrington 

430 FRENCH CLASSICISM (3 3) 

Study of the formation and the development of classicism and absolutism through the literary 
and visual arts. Prerequisites: 301, 302, and 311. 

Alcover 

440 FRENCH ENLIGHTENMENT (3 3) 

A study of literary, philosophical, and visual works that demonstrate how the ideas of the 
Enlightenment and the rise of the Bourgeoisie led to the French Revolution. Prerequisites: 301, 
302, and 311. 

Alcover 

445,S ENLIGHTENMENT AND COUNTER-ENLIGHTENMENT (3 3) 

See 545. Prerequisites: 301, 302, and 311. 

Wood 

450 TOPICS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY LYRIC (3 3) 

Study of the greatest poetry and prose poetry of the nineteenth century (from the Romantic 
period to the Symbolist era) through such writers as Desbordes-Valmore, Musset, Hugo, 
Bertrand, Nerval, Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud, and Mallarme. Prerequisites: 301 and 3 1 2 or 
placement exam. 

Harter 



316 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

455 NARRATIVE IN THE NINETEENTH-CENTURY (3 0-3) 
Studies in brief fiction and the novel from Romanticism through Realism and Naturalism, with 
attention to modem critical perspectives. Texts will be selected from the works of such authors 
as Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, Maupassant, Zola, and Villiers de 1 'Isle- Adam. Prerequisites: 301 
and 312 or placement exam. 

Harter 

460 WOMEN IN FRENCH LITERATURE (3 0-3) 

An examination of the ways in which women have been represented in fiction (by themselves 
and by others) since the beginning of the modem period. Readings from Mme de Lafayette, 
Sade, Baudelaire, Villiers de FIsle-Adam, Duras, and Wittig, will help focus attention on the 
constitution of "femininity" in the literary text as a cultural, historical, and social artifact. 
Prerequisites: 301 and 31 1 or 312. 

Harter 

462 THE LYRIC GENRE FROM BAUDELAIRE TO BONNEFOY (3-0-3) 

A study of major lyrical figures and poetic preoccupations of the XlXth and XXth centuries, 

not limited to the hexagon. Prerequisites: 301 and 312. 

Aresu 

466,S FICTION FROM BRETON TO THE PRESENT (3-0-3) ^^^ 

For description see 566. Prerequisites: 301 and 312 or placement exam. 

Harter 

All PROUST (3-0-3) ^ 

See 572. Prerequisites: 301, 302, 312. 

Wood 

475 FLAUBERT AND SARTRE (3-0-3) ^ , ,^ 

See 575. Prerequisites: 301, 302, 312. '^ ' 

Wood 

in. CULTURE/HISTORY/CIVILIZATION ^ 

3604^' GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN MODERN FRENCH HISTORY (3 0-3) 
An examination of gender roles, gender ideology, and sexual practices in the construction of 
French society and culture from the Enlightenment to World War II. Taught in English. Counts 
toward French major. Cross-listed as History 360. 

Sherman 

369 FRENCH CULTURE AND SOCIETY IN THE ANCIEN REGIME (3-0-3) 

This course covers approximately the years 1520-1750, with an emphasis on the period after 
1640. Taught in English. Counts toward French major. Cross-listed as History 369. 

Sherman 

371 FRANCE IN AN AGE OF REVOLUTION, 1750-1870 (3-0-3) 
Transformations in French society, culture, and politics before and after the revolution. Taught 
in English. Counts toward a French major. Cross-listed as History 371. 

Sherman 

yil SOCIETY AND POLITICS IN MODERN FRANCE, 1870-1988 (3 3) 

The emergence of modem France: the impact of war, industrialization, imperialism, and 
cultural mastery. Taught in English. Counts toward a French major. Cross-listed as History 
372. 

Sherman 



• - ■ 317 

405 PARIS(3-0-3) ^?'=-' -' ■ - ' -' - ; ■ -- 

Hislor>' of Paris as a city and a capital as well as a cultural, intellectual and economic center. 
Texts, slides, music and films. Prerequisite: 301 or placement exam. 

- Alcover 



407 FRENCH FILM I (3 3 ) 

See 507. Prerequisites: 301. 302. 303. 



408,S FRENCH FILM II ( 3 3 ) 

See 508. Prerequisites: 301. 302. 303. 



Alcover 



Alcover 



453,F THE FRENCH REVOLUTION IMAGINED: THE 19TH CENTURY 
AND AFTER (3 3) 

Historiography, fiction, and literature with some attention to painting and popular illustration. 
Taught in English. Readings primarily in French. Counts toward French major. Cross-listed as 
History 453. 

Sherman 

473 " LA REVOLUTION TRANQUILLE" : SEMINAR ON THE HISTORY 
AND CULTURE OF MODERN QUEBEC (3 3) 

Prerequisites: 301 and 312 or 372. For description see 573. 

' . ' Aresu 



474,F COLONIAL AND POSTCOLONIAL CULTURES (3 3) 

Prerequisites: 301 and 312 or 372. For description see 574. 

Aresu 



476 TRADITION, IDENTITY, AND HISTORICAL WRITING(3-0 3) 

Individuals and societies define themselves partly by establishing a relationship with the past. 
This course explores the intersection of cultural tradition, collective identity, and historical 
writing in the modem West. Topics include: the uses made of the classical past in movements 
from Renaissance humanism to contemporary Afrocentrism; the development of nationalist 
traditions; and the creation of European identities through juxtapositions with other cultures. 
French examples will be considered in comparative perspective. Cross-listed with History 476. 

Quiilen and Sherman 

IV. PHILOSOPHY, SOCIOLOGY, POLITICS, THEORY 

452 ART. POLITICS, AND SOCIETY IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY 

FRANCE (3-0-3) 
Realism, Impressionism, and "official" institutional culture. Taught in English. Counts toward 
a French major. 

Sherman 

463 FROM MODERNITY TO POSTMODERNITY AND THE THIRD 
TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION (3 3) 

Prerequisites: 301 and 311 or 3 12. See 563. 

■-■ ■ .0 .-. .. :.;!...- WOOO 

464 LITERATURE AND PSYCHOANALYSIS (3 3) 

See 564. Prerequisites: 301 and 312. 

Harie/ 



3 1 8 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

467,F THE POSTMODERN BREAK IN FRENCH PHILOSOPHY (3-0-3) 
For description see French 567. Prerequisites: 301, 302, 312 or placement exam. 

Goux 

470 FRENCH UTOPIANISTS (3 0-3) 

An examination of the most important utopianists: Cyrano de Bergerac, Fenelon, Fontenelle, 
Restif de la Bretonne, Mercier, Morelly, Fourier, Cabet, and others. Sociological as well as 
psycho-analytical and philosophical interpretations of Utopian discourse will be discussed 
(Marx, Barthes, Ricoeur, and others). Prerequisites: 301, 302, 312 or placement exam. 

Goux 

471 POLITICAL TEXTS: HISTORICAL AND LITERARY APPROACHES 

(3-0-3) 
Taught in English. Counts toward French major. Cross-listed as History 471. For description 
see 571. 

Harter and Sherman 



All THE MEANING OF THE SACRED IN FRENCH THOUGHT, FROM 

SURREALISM TO THE PRESENT (3 0-3) 
See 577. Prerequisites: 301, 302, 312. 

Wood 

478,S CONTEMPORARY FRENCH THOUGHT: TOWARD A SYMBOLIC 

ECONOMY (3-0-3) 
From the works of Mauss and Levi-Strauss (about the triple "exchange of goods," "exchange 
of words," "exchange of women") to the later developments brought by Bataille, Lacan, 
Baudrillard, Irigaray, and others, we will elaborate the idea of a "symbolic economy" that 
widens and transforms the notions of production, exchange, and consumption at the junction 
of anthropology, semiotics, psychoanalysis, and aesthetics. Prerequisites: 301, 302, and 312. 

GOILX 

403,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0 3) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

501 GRADUATE RESEARCH (MA) (0-0-3) 

502,F TEACHING COLLEGE FRENCH ( 1 -0- 1 ) 

Teaching in applied linguistics as well as practical aspects of teaching. Required for teaching 
assistants. 

Urrutibeheity 

503 SPECIAL TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE (3-0-3) 



504,S BEGINNINGS OF THE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE OF 

FRANCE (3-0-3) 
This course includes an external history of the French language, an examination of hagiographic 
literature and the chanson de geste in their cultural and artistic contexts, as well as a 
bibliographic component to acquaint the students with library tools available for research 
emphasizing medieval resources but not excluding those for later periods. Students will acquire 
a reading knowledge of Old French. 

. Nelson 



319 

507 FRENCH FILM (3-0-3) 

An introduction, through French cinema, into film analysis and the field of cinematographic 
illusion. 

Ale over 

508,S FRENCH FILM n (3-0 3) 

French cinema from La Nouvelle Vague to today. ^ 

■■- Alcover 

510 THE LITERARY AND HISTORICAL IMAGE OF THE MEDIEVAL 

WOMAN (3-0-3) 
Comparison and contrast of the presentation of the medieval woman in literature with extant 
evidence concerning historical women from contemporary documents and records. 

Nelson 

515 COURTLY LOVE IN MEDIEVAL FRANCE (3-0-3) 

In an attempt to define this most ambiguous expression, the course will examine the social, 
religious, philosophical, and historical aspects of the twelfth century that combined to produce 
a new concept of love that found expression first in Occitan lyric poetry and later in the poetry, 
lais, and romances of northern France. Texts will include lyric poetry of both langue d'oc and 
langue d'oil, the lais of Marie de France, Le Chevalier a la charette by Chr etien de Troyes. 

Nelson 

525 FRENCH HUMANISM (3-0-3) 

Carrington 

530 FRENCH CLASSICISM (3-0 3) 

Formation and culmination of absolutism and classicism in the literary and visual arts. 

Alcover 

540 THE AGE OF ENLIGHTENMENT (3-0-3) 

Enlightenment and "Bourgeoisie": Works of major writers and painters of this age will be 

examined in their social context and also in light of contemporary critical theory. 

Alcover 

543,F POLEMICS AND RHETORICS (3 0-3) 

The study of the strategies of persuasion through works such as Satire menippee. Mazarinades, 
Pascal's Provinciales, Voltaire's Sermon des Cinquante, Beranger's Chansons, Hugo's Chdtiments 
and Zola's J'accuse. 

■ , Alcover 

-'ji-. - ■ . • 

545 ENLIGHTENMENT AND COUNTER-ENLIGHTENMENT (3 0-3) 
The classic texts of the 18th-century — Kant, Condorcet. d'Holbach, etc. — and the anti- 
Enlightenment tradition: de Sade, the romantic reaction, de Maistre, Nietzsche. Continuation 
of this debate in French and European thought: Sartre, Marxism, postructuralism (e.g., versus 
Habermas), Adomo, 80's neoliberalism, the return of the sacred in recent French thought. 
Taught alternately in French and in English. 

Wood 

548 FRENCH AUTOBIOGRAPHERS (3 0-3) 

Analysis of the perception, (re)presentation. and rationalization of the self as well as the study 
of the autobiographical form as genre through the works of Montaigne. Sevigne, Saint-Simon, 
Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Sand, Sartre, and Beauvoir. 

Alcover 



320 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

555 STUDIES IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY FICTION (3-0-3) 

Topics will vary to include such subjects as Fantastic narrative and the theoretical problems 

this form presents. 

H alter 

560 DEVELOPMENTS IN FRENCH FEMINIST THEORY (3-0-3) 

A study of recent French feminist theory with a view to mapping out this critical perspective 

both in its ideological and in its interpretive implications. 

Team -taught by Alcover. Harter. Wood 

562 THE LYRIC GENRE FROM BAUDELAIRE TO BONNEFOY (3-0-3) ' 
Using Bonnefoy's theoretical reflection in "La presence et I'image" as a point of departure, the 
seminar will study the situation of the writing subject and the strategies of representation in the 
modem lyric, with special reference to such poets as Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Lautreamont, 
Breton, Perse, Ponge, and Bonnefoy. 

Aresu 

563 FROM MODERNITY TO POSTMODERNITY AND THE THIRD 
TECHNOLOGICAL REVOLUTION (3 3) 

Literary and philosophical postmodemity and feminism as, simultaneously, bearers and 
problematisers of the "postindustrial" revolution — the services/information economy, the 
dissolution of the nuclear family, the end of Oedipus, the functionally adaptive feminization (or 
rather, androgynization) of the work-force, etc. Taught alternately in French and in English. 

Wood 

564 LITERATURE AND PSYCHOANALYSIS (3 3) 

An articulation of those ways in which literature and psychoanalysis have seemed most 
fruitfully to inform each other. Readings in primary literature as well as in Freud, Lacan, 
Cixous, Lacoue-Labarthe, Jameson, Freeman, and others. 

Harter 

566,F FICTIONAL NARRATIVES FROM BRETON TO THE PRESENT (3-0^3) '^^ 
The seminar will focus on myth and the production of imaginaires as they shape modem and 
postmodem narratives and reflect the preoccupations of other art forms, particularly painting 
and film. Selections from such writers as Breton, Camus, Le Clezio, Yourcenar, the New 
Novelists, Sollers and Modiano. 

Aresu 

567 THE POSTMODERN BREAK IN FRENCH PHILOSOPHY (3 3) 

A study of the questioning of philosophical modernity (starting with Descartes and the 
Enlightenment philosophers) by structuralist and poststructuralist thinkers and theorists of the 
postmodem condition. Among contemporary authors studied will be Lacan, Derrida, Foucaull, 
Lyotard, and others. 

Gou.\ 

568 FRENCH PHILOSOPHY (3 3) 

Moral philosophy from Descartes to today: the relationship between the individual and society, 
the problem of freedom and values, the questions of universality, humanism, the important 
moments of the constitution and deconstitution of the subject through a study of moral 
philosophers: Descartes, Rousseau. Condorcet, Comte. Guyau. Durkheim, Fouillee. Bergson, 
Alain, Camus, Sartre, Simone de Beauvior, Lacan, Irigaray, Foucault, Ricoeur. 

Goux 



569 MODERN LITERATURE AND LITERARY THEORY: TOWARDS AN 
AESTHETICS OF THE FRAGMENTARY (3-0 3) 

A study of the way in which fragmentation, both as epistemological and linguistic phenom- 
enon, has become in the modem/postmodern period a crucial perspective through which to 
view not just literary, but also philosophical and theoretical texts. Readings among such writers 
as Baudelaire, Flaubert, Breton, Beckett, and Barthes. 

Harter 

570 THEORY AND PRACTICE IN FRENCH CULTURAL HISTORY (3-0-3) 

An examination of significant recent work in modem French cultural history since the 
Enlightenment in the context of the major theoretical approaches (Marxism, cultural anthropol- 
ogy, and postmodernism) that have influenced it. Taught in English. Cross-listed as History 
570. 

. .-* : .. ., 1. Sherman 

571 POLITICAL TEXTS: HISTORICAL AND LITERARY APPROACHES 

Through readings that will include novels, memoirs, speeches, and biographical writing, 
chiefly from the Third Republic, this course will examine the ways in which history and 
narrative theory illumine and inform our understanding of political texts. Taught in English. 
Cross-listed as History 571. 

Team-taught by Sherman and Harter 

572 PROUST (3-0-3) 

Extensive readings from A la recherche dit temps perdu — mobilizing simultaneously close textual 
readings and broad-ranging meditations on the historical meaning of the work in terms of the 
historv of artistic modernism and social modernity. Taught alternately in French and in English. 

Wood 

573 " LA REVOLUTION TRANQUILLE" : SEMINAR ON THE HISTORY 
AND CULTURE OF MODERN QUEBEC 

Literary texts by Carrier, Godbout, Maillet, Hebert. The plastic arts: Pellan, Riopelle, Bordaus. 
"Le cinema direct" and the cinematography of Perrault, Jutra, and Arcand. Emphasis varies 
from year to year. 

Aresu 

574 COLONIAL AND POSTCOLONIAL CULTURES (3 3) 

History and theory of the cultural production of the Maghreb, Africa South of the Sahara, and 
the Caribbean, with special reference to the francophone sector. The course will examine 
significant essays, art, cinematography, and literature. Emphasis varies from year to year. 

Aresu 

515,S FLAUBERT AND SARTRE: "LIDIOT DE LA FAMILLE" (3 3) 

Close readmgs of Flaubert (the major novels, juvenilia) in conjunction with Sartre's biography 
of Flaubert with a view to 1 ) investigating the theoretical problems entailed in mobilizing 
simultaneously Marxism, sociology, psychoanalysis, literary history and literary critical 
analysis, and 2) comparing late Sartre with poststructuralist accounts of the construction of the 
subject. Taught alternately in French and in English. 

Wood 

576 THE NEW NOVEL (3 3 ) 

Butor, Duras, Robbe-Grillet, Simon, Sarraute, with special reference to the novels of Claude 
Simon. 

Aresu 



322 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

577 THE MEANING OF THE SACRED IN FRENCH THOUGHT FROM 

SURREALISM TO THE PRESENT (3-0-3) 
Surrealism, College de sociologie, Sartre, Levinas, Girard, Toumier, Derrida, etc. The reasons 
for, and significance of, the rise of a posttheological notion of the sacred in modernity. 
Postmodern theology and cosmology. Taught alternately in French and in English. 

Wood 

Sl% CONTEMPORARY FRENCH THOUGHT (3-0-3) 
For description see French 478. 

Goux 

580,F TWENTIETH-CENTURY FRENCH THEORY FROM SAUSSURE TO 

IRIGARAY I (3-0-3) 
Introduction to psychoanalytic, Marxist, existentialist, semiotic, post-structuralist, feminist 
theoretical developments and their mobilization for interpretation and critical methodology. 
Required for graduate students. Taught in alternate years by Professors Goux (in French) and 
Wood (in English). 

581,S TWENTIETH-CENTURY FRENCH THEORY FROM SAUSSURE TO 

IRIGARAY n (3-0-3) 
See description for 580. Required for graduate students. 

800 THESIS RESEARCH (Ph.D.) 



Italian Language and Culture 

Students who have completed two years of Italian at Rice are eligible to compete 
for a $3,000 Summer Travel Scholarship presented by the Federation of Italian- 
American Organizations of Greater Houston and a scholarship of $1 ,000 presented by 
the Italy in America Association. 

101 J^ ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I (4-0-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: I.l 

Concentration on all four language skills supplemented by work in the language laboratory. 
Basic elements of Italian culture and civilization: an overview of current events and ideas. This 
course also includes a "RAI" (Radio Audizioni Italiane) video. 

Caflisch 

102,S ELEMENTARY ITALIAN \\ (4-0-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE I.l 
Continuation of Italian 101. 

Caflisch 

201,F INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN I (3-0-3) a i u 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE I.l 

A review and consolidation of the structure of comtemporary Italian. Literary and cultural 
readings serve as a basis for class discussion and conversation. Oral reports and compositions 
will help increase fluency and naturalness. This course also includes a "RAI" (Radio Audizioni 
Italiane) video and a movie by an Italian director. 

Caflisch 



- 323 

202,S INTERMEDIATE ITALIAN II (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE 1. 1 _ ' 
Continuation of Italian 201 . 

_ j! "; - j' Caflisch 

301,F MODERN ITALIAN LITERATURE I (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE 1.1 

An introductory survey of modem Italian writers used as a vehicle for reinforcing and enhancing 
the study of Italian langauge and culture. Prerequisite: Ital 202 or placement exam. 

.:.-.• Caflisch 

302,S IMAGES OF ITALIAN CULTURE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE I.l 

Expression and development of Italy's historical, social, and artistic achievements. 

Caflisch 



324 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Geology and Geophysics -'♦fc»> 



The Wiess School of Natural Sciences 



Professor Anderson, Chair 

Professors Ave Lallemant, Baker( Emeritus). Bally, De Bremaecker, Gardner, 

Heymann, Leeman. Oldow (on leave Fall J992), Stormer (on leave 1992-93), 

Talwani (on leave Spring 1993}, and Vail ion leave 1992-93) 

Associate Professors Clark (Emeritus), Droxler, Dunbar, Levander 

Sawyer, and Wright 

Assistant Professor Sisson 

Adjunct Professors Buffler, Burke, Cramez, Mango, Savit, 

Taner, and Wilson 

Adjunct Associate Professors Dravis and Riese 

''•^ ' "• f Adjunct Assistant Professor Sullivan 

Lecturer R, Wright Dunbar 

Degrees Ojfered: B.A., M.A.. Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program in Geology. The following courses are required for 
completion of the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in geology: 

Geology 101, 102, 311. 312, 331, 332, 334. 361, 390, and 402. 

At least six semester hours in additional courses at the 300-level or higher, from 
an approved list in science and engineering. 

The following supporting courses are also required: 

Mathematics 101, 102, and 211; 

Chemistry 101 or 1 1 1, 102 or 1 12, 105; 

Physics 101, 102, 132; 

Mathematical Sciences 223 (2 hours Fortran). 

Double majors including geology must comply with the above requirements 
except that the six hours of geology electives may be deleted. 

Students in the geology major must satisfy the distribution requirements and 
complete no fewer than 60 semester hours in addition to the Departmental require- 
ments for the Geology major for a total of 1 33 semester hours. 

The Department of Geology and Geophysics offers an approved curriculum 
leading to certification in earth science as a second teaching field. The curriculum 
consists of 25 semester hours of introductory courses which would most benefit a 
secondary school teacher, i.e., physical and historical geology, study of minerals, 
rocks, and fossils; some work in astronomy, meteorology, and oceanography. 

Undergraduate Program in Geophysics. The following courses are required for 
completion of the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in geophysics: 

Geology 101. 102.311.331,334,361.390,441,442,461; 

Mathematics 101, 102, 211,212; / 

Chemistry 101 or 1 1 1, 102 or 1 12, 105: 

Physics 101, 102. 132, 201.231; 

Mathematical Sciences 223 (2 hours Fortran). 

Additional courses recommended but not required are Physics 30 1 . Mathematical 
Sciences 310 or Mathematics 355. and Mathematical Sciences 340. 



; ■ ■ H' :.:;. ::: 325 

Students in the geophysics major must satisfy the distribution requirements and 
complete no fewer than 60 semester hours in addition to the Departmental require- 
ments for the Geophysics major for a total of 134 semester hours. 

Graduate Program. The department offers graduate programs leading to M. A. 
and Ph.D degrees. At present the department is prepared to offer advanced work in 
marine geology-oceanography, stratigraphy, sedimentation, carbonate petrology, ig- 
neous petrology, meteoritics, geochemistry, structural geology, regional tectonics, 
reflection and crustal seismology, and geodynamics. Programs of study and research 
that incorporate more than one of these specialties are encouraged. 

We expect all incoming students to have a strong background in physics, 
chemistry, and mathematics and to have, or to acquire, a broad grounding in 
fundamental earth sciences. We encourage applications from well qualified students 
with degrees in the other sciences and mathematics. Candidates for advanced degrees 
must pass a comprehensive written qualifying exam given at the beginning of the 
second semester. Candidates who do not have a previous bachelor's or master's degree 
in Geology or Geophysics may choose to take the written comprehensive exam in their 
second year. 

Fellowships and/or tuition scholarships, which do not obligate a student to 
specific research projects, are available for the first year of study. During the first year 
students select an advisor and a research project, and in the second and subsequent 
years they normally receive a stipend and tuition from external funds for specific 
research. Our degree programs require full time study and close interaction with 
faculty and fellow students for the optimum educational experience. Therefore, we do 
not encourage part-time students who will be concurrently employed in full (or nearly 
full) time positions outside the university. As part of their training all graduate students 
are expected to satisfactorily perform a limited amount of teaching as assistants in 
Geology and Geophysics courses. These teaching requirements are unrelated to 
stipends or scholarships. 

The general requirements for the M.A. and Ph.D. are similar. However, the Ph.D. 
demands the attainment of a significantly higher level of knowledge, research skills, 
and scholarly independence. Details of the requirements are contained in the depart- 
mental "Guidelines for Advanced Degrees in the Department of Geology and Geo- 
physics" distributed to all incoming students, and are only summarized here. All 
university requirements apply. Most students can expect to spend at least two years 
beyond the bachelor's degree to complete requirements for the master's degree, and at 
least two years beyond the master's degree for the Ph.D. Students of exceptional ability 
with a bachelor's degree may be allowed to work directly toward the Ph.D. In this case, 
the course of study will be equivalent to that required for both degrees, and perfor- 
mance on the examinations and the thesis will be at the level required for the Ph.D. 

Course requirements are flexible to meet the needs of individual students' 
programs. Each candidate will complete a course of study determined by his/her major 
professor and advisory committee and approved by the departmental Graduate 
Committee. Geology 403 is the only required course, but the course program for each 
degree includes 20 credit hours of course work at the 400 level and above (or other 
approved courses), other than research courses. The department requires that a student 
maintain a grade point average of 3.0 (B) or better. 



326 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

During the second semester of residence, students will register for the preparation 
of a thesis proposal. The student must pass an oral qualifying exam based on the 
research proposal before beginning the research program. The research program 
culminates in a thesis representing an original contribution to science, which is 
ultimately published. Finally, the research and the conclusions of the thesis are 
defended in an oral examination. .; 



Geology Courses 

101,F THE EARTH (3-3-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

Nature of the earth and the processes that change it. Laboratory includes the study of rocks, 
minerals, geological maps, air photos, and a one weekend field trip. 

Heymann, D., Wright Dunbar, R. 

102,S HISTORICAL GEOLOGY (3-3-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

History of the earth, including evolution of continents, ocean basins, and life over the last 4.6 
billion years. Laboratory exercises include one weekend field trip to the central Texas hill 
country. . 

■At'.-ysn^i xot «bni/t im-im.". in^fl rtol'i ■.. oviaoe bright Dunbar, R. 

202,S GEOPHYSICS IN THE STUDY OF THE EARTH (3-0-3) .. 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

The historical development of geophysics. Application of geophysical methods to learn about 
the Earth's interior and to explore for oil and other minerals. For coherent minors, non-majors 
and majors. Prerequisite: Geol 101 is recommended but not required. 

Talwani, M., Levander, A. 

214,S THE PLANETS (3-0-3) - ■'"'!"''!""'^"° ^' 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

The physical, chemical, and geological development of the solar system from 4.6 billion years 
ago until today. All planets, their major satellites, comets, and asteroids will be discussed 
individually. For coherent minors and non-majors. Prerequisite: Geol 101. 

Heymann, D. 

311,F MINERALOGY (3-6-5) o 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 i 
Introduction to crystallography, crystal chemistry, systematics and classification, physical and 
chemical properties, distribution, occurrence and genesis of minerals, and optical mineralogy. 

Leeman, W., Stormer, J., Sisson, V. 

312,S PETROLOGY (3-3-4) 

Description and interpretation of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Laboratory work emphasizes 
study of rock thin sections with petrographic microscope, and includes a one weekend field trip. 
Prerequisite: Geol 311. 

Wright, J., Sisson, V. 

331,F STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (3-3-4) 

Introduction to deformation mechanics, structural analysis of faults and folds, and elementary 
tectonics. Laboratory emphasizes practical use of structural analysis, and includes a one 
weekend field trip. 

Oldow, J., Ave Lallemant, H. 
.'\ 



-y-: ^ -^ • 327 

332,S SEDIMENTOLOGY (3 3-4) 

Processes in sedimentation and sedimentary rocks including both clastic and carbonate rocks. 
Laboratory exercises include a one weekend field trip. 

Anderson, J., Droxler, A., Dunbar. R.B. 

333,F STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

Same course as Gaol 331 without the laboratory. For non-majors only. 

Oldow, J., Ave Lallemant, H. 

334,S FIELD MAPPING TECHNIQUES (0-6-2) 

Beginning field techniques taught in seven labs and seven field days plus class meetings. 

Geologic map and report to be submitted. Prerequisite: Geol 331 or permission of instructor. 

>i ' Oldow, J., Ave Lallemant, H. 

341,F THE OCEANS (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

Introduction to oceanography; survey of the geological, physical, and biological aspects. For 
nonscience majors. 

• . . , ,. , Anderson, J., Droxler, A., Dunbar, R.B. 

352,S ENGINEERING GEOLOGY (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 

Analysis, in terms of engineering and environmental applications, of earthquakes, faults, 
landslides, shorelines, ground water, subsidence, and other geologic phenomena. Techniques of 
engineering geology investigation. 

Clark, H.C. 

361,F GEOPHYSICS (3-3-4) 

Description and analysis of gravity, magnetic, thermal, and seismic properties of the earth and 

their bearing on plate tectonics. Prerequisite: Masc 223 or Comp 211. 

De Bremaecker, J. 

390, Summer. FIELD GEOLOGY (0- 1 8-6) 
A six-week course in geology. 

402,S PALEONTOLOGY (2-6-4) 

Introduction to the taxonomy, systematics, morphology, ecology, paleoecology and correlation 
of fossils. Aspects of advanced historical geology will also be covered.Not offered every year. 

Anderson, J. 

4034^ ADVANCED PHYSICAL GEOLOGY (1-0-0) 

Introduction to current research in geology. Each faculty member in department participates by 

describing his/her research and some of the techniques involved. 

4044^ MICROPALEONTOLOGY (2-6-4) 

Study of microfossils: emphasis on identification, ecology, paleoecology, and biostratigraphy of 
radiolaha and foraminiferia. Prerequisites: Geology 402 or permission of department. Not 
offered every year. 

4054^ SEMINAR: CURRENT RESEARCH IN EARTH SCIENCES 

A series of lectures on current research in various areas of Geology and Geophysics. 

406,S SEMINAR: CURRENT RESEARCH IN EARTH SCIENCES 

See Geol. 405. 



328 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

411,F MET AMORPHIC PETROLOGY (3 3-4) ^^. 

Evaluation of sub-solidus mineral equilibria through consideration of natural assemblages, 
thermodynamic calculations, and experiments. Labs will stress thin section petrography. Not 
offered every year. Prerequisite: Geol. 312. 

Sis son, V. 

412,S IGNEOUS PETROLOGY (3-3-4) i * 

Evaluation of the evolution of igneous rocks in the earth's crust and mantle. Topics will include 
phase equilibria, experimental studies and geochemistry. Labs will stress thin section petrog- 
raphy. Not offered every year. 

rC-AOl^ ?.5r( IOTVIH">.'iIT Leeman, W.. Wright, J. 

4154^ ECONOMIC GEOLOGY— PETROLEUM (3-0-3) 6 

A study of the geology of petroleum: origin, migration, and accumulation will be studied. 
Government regulation and industry economics will be examined. Not offered every year. 

416,S ECONOMIC GEOLOGY— MINERAL DEPOSITS (3-0-3) 
An overview of metallic and non-metallic mineral deposits, theories of their origin, and 
classification. The impact of government regulation, economics, production practices, and 
exploration will be considered. Not offered every year. 

418,S GEOLOGICAL OCEANOGRAPHY (3-3-4) 

Study of geological aspects of oceanography, including geomorphology, nearshore processes, 
seafloor spreading, plate tectonics, marine geophysics, marine sediments, and paleoceanography . 
Not offered every year. 

Anderson, J., Dunbar, R.B., Droxler, A. 

'it 
420,S MARINE GEOPHYSICAL METHODS 

Field course which focuses on methods of seismic reflection, data acquisition, processing, and 
analysis. Experiments will be carried out using the research vessel. Students will process and 
interpret data and present findings. Not offered every year. 

Anderson, J., Sawyer, D. 
A 
421,F DEEP SEA SEDIMENTOLOGY/PALEOCEANOGRAPHY (3-0-3) 
Study of the Mesozoic and Cenozoic evolution of the ocean system based on the analyses of 
biogenic and terrigenous deep sea sediments. Prerequisite: Geol 332. 

Droxler, A., Dunbar, R.B.. 

423,S ANTARCTIC MARINE GEOLOGY (3 3) 

The study of marine geologic principles and processes using examples from the Southern Oceans. 
Not offered every year. 

Anderson, J. 

427,F SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY (3 3) 

Principles of sequence stratigraphy (a new tool used to subdivide, correlate, and map sedimen- 
tary rocks within chronostratigraphically constrained genetic intervals) and its application to 
outcrop, well log, and seismic data. ,,j i^oiinupsnsrn .anstfairr 

Vail, P. 

428,S GEOLOGIC INTERPRETATION OF REFLECTION SEISMIC '^t 

PROFILES (3-3-4) 
Discussion and application of seismic stratigraphic and structural interpretation procedures, 
including the integration of surface and subsurface data with seismic reflection profiles. Not 
offered every year. 

Bally, A. 



329 

432,F MICROPALEONTOLOGY AND WELL LOG SEQUENCE 

STRATIGRAPHY (3-0-3) 
The basic concepts and procedures for interpreting stratigraphy on individual well logs and 
correlating between well logs. The fundamentals of micropaleontology and how micropaleon- 
tology is used to determine geologic age and environments of deposition. Well log sequence 
stratigraphic analysis is used to aid in the interpretation of depositional environments and 
lithofacies, tie in with seismic data, and correlate between wells. Not offered every year. 

Vail, P. 

438,S SEDIMENTARY GEOCHEMISTRY AND MINERALOGY (3-0 3) 
Study of the chemistry of environments of formation of the major sedimentary minerals and rocks 
and secular variations through geologic history. Not offered every year. 

Dunbar. R.B. 

441,S GEOPHYSICAL DATA ANALYSIS (3 3-4) 

Review complex varibles, Fourier, Laplace, and Z-transforms; convolution, correlation, filtering, 
deconvolution, probability, sampling and aliasing, spectral estimation and discrete mverse 
theory. Computer based exercises. Prerequisite: Math 211. 

Sawyer, D. 

442J^ EXPLORATION GEOPHYSICS (3 6 5) 

Principles and procedures involved m geophysical exploration. Emphasis is on reflection 
seismology, involving acquisition, processing, and mterpretation of data. Includes computer 
exercises. 

Sawyer. D.. Levander, A. 

452,F ADVANCED ENGINEERING GEOLOGY (3-0-3) 

Consideration of methods and research in engineering geology. Application of geophysical 
techniques to specific problems will be emphasized. Students will work as teams on several field 
projects. Not offered every year. 

Clark. H. 

453,F CHEMISTRY OF THE EARTH (3 3) 

An intermediate level, comprehensive geochemistry course with many problem solving exer- 
cises. Topics will include both high-pressure, high-temperature as well as low-temperature 
aqueous geochemistry. 

Heymann. D. 

459,F MODELS IN GEOLOGY (3-0 3) 

Discussion of models in general; numerical solutions of heat transfer, folding, and convection 
problems by finite differences, finite elements, and boundary elements methods. Prerequisite: 
Math 211,212, Masc 223, 340. Not offered every year. 

De Bremaecker. J . 

461,F GEOPHYSICS: REFLECTION SEISMOLOGY (3 3) 

Principles of elastic wave initiation, propagation, and reflection in ideal media and real rocks, 
with applications to exploration for hydrocarbons. Prerequisite: Math 21 l.Phys 101. 102. Math 
212 recommended, may be taken concurrently. Not offered every year. 

Levander, A. 

462,S GEODYNAMICS (3 3) 

The forces which govern the motions and deformations in the earth, and how they are constrained 
by geophysical and geological measurements. Prerequisite: Math 211, 212; Geol 361. Not 
offered every year. 

- - De Bremaecker. J .. Sawyer. D. 



330 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

463,F ADVANCED TECTONICS (3-3-4) 

Mechanics of rock deformation in theory, in experiments, and in nature. 

Ave Lallemant, H.. Oldow, J. 

464,S FUNDAMENTALS OF PLATE TECTONICS (2-3-3) 

Introduction to plate tectonics theory concerning geometric constraints to plate motions, driving 

mechanism, behavior at plate boundaries, and intraplate tectonism. Not offered every year. 

Oldow J., Bally, A. 

465,F/S COMPARATIVE PHANEROZOIC TECTONICS (3-3-4) 
A synthesis of the Phanerozoic tectonic evolution of the earth. Global investigation of fold and 
thrust belts, their relationship to convergent plate boundaries, associated structural and 
stratigraphic relations, and the mechanics of deformation. Prerequisite: Geol 464. Best when 
taken with 428. Not offered every year. 

Ball\\A> 

471,F ISOTOPE GEOLOGY (3-0 3) 

An introduction to the principles, interpretation and techniques of Radiogenic isotope systems. • 
The course will focus on geochronology applications as well as the use of isotopes in the study 
of petrogenesis of igneous rocks. 

Wright, J., Heymann, D. 

481,F SENIOR RESEARCH IN GEOLOGY (Variable) 
Advanced work adapted to the needs of the individual student. 

Staff 

482,S SENIOR RESEARCH IN GEOLOGY (Variable) 
See Geol 481. 

Staff 

491,F SPECIAL STUDIES (Variable) 

Study in specific fields under the guidance of a staff member. 

Staff 

492,S SPECIAL STUDIES (Variable) 
See Geol 491. 

.n: ■., Staff 

501,F SPECIAL STUDIES (Variable) 

Advanced work in certain phases of geology adapted to the needs of individual graduate students. 

Prerequisite: permission of department. 

Staff 

502,S SPECIAL STUDIES (Variable) 
See Geol 501. 

Staff 

503,Summer SPECIAL STUDIES (Variable) 
See Geol 501. .n . r-cijin^.a:,'. 

Staff 

504,F CLASTIC SEDIMENTARY ENVIRONMENTS, PROCESSES, AND 

FACIES (3-0-3) 
Study of modem and ancient sedimentary environments with emphasis on field work. Deposi- 
tional models examined in relation to climatic, oceanographic, and tectonic influences. 

Anderson, J. 



:-^ ;.^- - 331 

505,F APPLIED SEDIMENTOLOGY (1-6-3) 

Field investigation of sedimentary deposits of northwestern New Mexico to provide graduate 
students in sedimentology with training in field methods, interpretation of sedimentary deposits, 
and facies mapping. Prerequisite: Geol 504. Not offered every year. 

Anderson, J., Wright Dunbar, R. 

506,S CARBONATE SEDIMENTOLOGY (3-0-4) 

Characterization of modem and ancient, shallow and deep sedimentary environments and facies. 
Examination of different depositional models in relation to climate, as well as hydrographic and 
geographic settings. Three field trips. Prerequisite: Geol 332. 

Droxler, A. 

511F-530S SEMINARS IN GEOLOGY (Variable) 

Individual seminars cover different topics in different years and may be taken more than once. 

Staff 

535,F STABLE ISOTOPE GEOCHEMISTRY (3 0-3) 

Review of basic principles of isotope fractionation mechanisms and distribution of isotopes with 

focus on significance to major geological problems. Not offered every year. 

Dunbar, R.B. 

537,F ADVANCED SEDIMENTARY GEOLOGY (3-3-4) 

Lecture, lab, and field problems focusing on sedimentology and sedimentary petrography. Not 

offered every year. 

Staff 

539,F ADVANCED PETROLOGY (3 3-4) 

Advanced topics in igneous and metamorphic petrology with emphasis on interests of the staff. 
Modem developments are rigorously examined in physico-chemical terms. Not offered every 
year. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: Geol 412 or equivalent. 

Stormer, J.. Leeman, W., Wright, J. 

540,S ADVANCED PETROLOGY (3 3 4) 

See Geol 539. 

,. Stormer, J., Leeman, W., Wright, J. 

542,S WAVE PROPAGATION IN HETERGENOUS MEDIA (3 3 ) 

Review of elastodynamics. Calculation of synthetic seismograms for acoustic and elastic media 
using reflectivity, asymptotic and finite difference methods. Migration of reflection data by finite 
difference. FK and boundary integral methods. Also offered as MASC 592. Prerequisite: Geol 
441, or MASC 335, 336; GEOL 461 recommended. 

Levander. A.. Symes. W. 

550,S ADVANCED MINERALOGY AND CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY (3 3) 

Advanced topics in crystal structure, chemistry, thermodynamics and solution models. Detailed 
examination of important mineral groups such as feldspars, oxides, carbonates, phy llosilicates, 
etc. Not offered every year. 

Stormer. J. 

561,F ADVANCED TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (3 3) 

Content varies from year to year: Convection, advanced wave propagation, tectonophysics, 
inverse problems, etc. May be taken more than once. Not offered every year. 

De Bremaecker. J.. Saw\er. D. 

562,S ADVANCED TOPICS IN GEOPHYSICS (3 3) 

See Geol 561. 

De Bremaecker. J . Saw\er D. 



332 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

568,S STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF DEFORMED ROCKS (3-3-4) 
Studies of structures, textures, and fabrics of deformed rocks, strain and kinematic analysis. 

Ave Lallemant, H. 

572,S INTRODUCTION TO INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA SPEC- 
TROSCOPY (2-2-2) 

An applied workshop on the theory and application of TCP spectroscopy with emphasis on 
practical experience in quantitative analysis. Prerequisites: approval of instructor. Not offered 
every year. 

Leeman, W. 

574,S ELECTRON MICROPROBE/SCANNING ELECTRON MICRO- 
SCOPE: THEORY (2 2 2) 

Principles, techniques, and applications of the Electron Microprobe/SEM. Emphasis on 
quantitative analysis and geological problems. Practical laboratory instruction and experience 
in analytical techniques. 

: , •^, '■-•^ 5 ' . ; Stormer, J. 

579,F PREPARATION OF M.A. THESIS PROPOSAL (0-9-3) 
Students may not receive credit for both Geol 579 and 580. 

580,S PREPARATION OF M.A. THESIS PROPOSAL (0-9-3) 
See Geol 579. 

Staff 

589,F PREPARATION OF PH.D. THESIS PROPOSAL (0-9-3) 
Students may not receive credit for both Geol 589 and 590. 

\_U^J Ur^l-VUKf 1\JW i. .t>llll^l iu.^>l>I^>l'.r ,>.^..;^.. Staff 

590,S PREPARATION OF PH.D. THESIS PROPOSAL (0-9-3) 
See Geol 589. 

- - -' ^-- — - Staff 

800,F/S/Suinmer THESIS RESEARCH (Variable) 

Staff 



(?.-0-f,) 



-;■_•-■ ' . 333 

German and Slavic Studies 



Professor M. Eifler, Chair 

Professors S. L. Clark, J. Copeland, E. M. Thompson, 

K. Weissenberger, J. Wilson, and M. Winkler 

Associate Professor R. G. Jones 

Adjunct Professor E. D. Mitchell 

Lecturer A. Hill 



German Studies 



Degrees Offered: B.A.,M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. Students majoring in German may pursue either of 
two options: German Literature or German Studies. 

For an option in German Literature the requirements are: 

1. Completion of a program approved by the Department. 

2. The equivalent of at least 24 semester hours (eight courses) numbered 
German 300 or higher. 

The Department recommends related courses in art, music, linguistics, history, 
philosophy, and other literatures. 

For an option in German Studies the requirements are: 

1 . Completion of a program which has been defined in close cooperation with 
the German departmental undergraduate adviser. 

2. The equivalent of at least 1 8 semester hours ( six courses) in German courses 
numbered 300 or higher. 

3. At least 12 semester hours (four courses) offered by the Department in 
German Culture Studies or courses relating to the field of German in other 
departments. 

This option in German Studies, which permits maximum flexibility within a 
frame of clearly defined objectives, allows an interdisciplinary approach to German 
affairs. The student can incorporate into the study of German language and literature 
subject-related courses in political science, history, musicology, art history, film, 
philosophy, and economics. The option in German studies is designed for students who 
are preparing for a career in communications, international law. business, banking, or 
diplomacy and for graduate study in a variety of fields such as history, political science, 
library science, art history, etc. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must also 
satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours 
outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 semester 
hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-90. 

Honors Program. The department offers a special program for outstanding 
German majors consisting of independent readings and research which must lead to 
a substantial honors essay under the supervision of a departmental faculty member. 



334 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

German Literature and Culture Studies in Translation. Courses in German 
Studies are open to undergraduate students from all disciplines. Readings and 
discussions are in English. These courses may also fulfill the requirements of a 
German Studies major. 

Coherent Minor in German Studies. This minor will introduce students to the 
history, politics, literature and culture of Germany in the 20th century. Required are 
two courses of Germ 3 13, Germ 314, Germ 376, Poll 360 or Hist 355; and one course 
of Germ 361, Germ 391, Hist 376, and Phil 308. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1. Completion with high standing of a program approved by the Department. 
Normally, this includes 24 semester hours at the graduate level plus thesis 
work. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one foreign language 
other than German approved by the Department. 

3. Completion of an acceptable thesis. 

4. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the thesis and related 
topics. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy: '^ 

1 . Completion with high standing of a program approved by the Department. 
Normally, this includes 45 semester hours at the graduate level, including 
those required for the degree of Master of Arts. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in two foreign languages 
other than German approved by the Department. 

3. Satisfactory performance on a preliminary written and oral examination on 
the general field of German studies: this examination is based in part on a 
reading list provided by the Department. 

4. Completion of a dissertation approved by the Department; the dissertation is 
^il,'.^ expected to represent an original contribution to knowledge. 

5. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the dissertation and 
rr? related fields. 

As part of their training, graduate students, regardless of the type of appointment, 
will be required to perform some duties, such as teaching or assisting in classes, work 
in the language laboratory, assistance in faculty research, and other activities sug- 
gested by the department. 

Scholarships: Available for German Studies from the Dr. and Mrs. Earl Douglas 
Mitchell Fellowship Fund, Max Freund Prize, and the Goethe Institut Prize. 

olnti-f.^^ >"3nii39 

German Courses ' -"j ' - i k; v t. .; 

101,F ELEMENTARY GERMAN (3 1-4) 
* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 i«c.rr,t,p«..K .. 

NOTE: 102 must be completed to receive dist. credit for 101. Introductory German with 
emphasis on speaking and reading. The course is supplemented by language laboratory work. 

Weissenberger. K. , Staff 

'Tt rioiriw dytRydsn ; 



335 

102,S ELEMENTARY GERMAN (3-1-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 ' 

Prerequisite: Germ 101 or equivalent. 

Weissenberger. K. . Staff 

103, F/S ELEMENTARY GERMAN (6-2 8) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 ' • ^ ' 
Offered in Summer (equivalent to Germ 101 and Germ 102). 

Staff 

201,F INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Grammar, conversation, and extensive reading supplemented by films and language laboratory 

work. 

^ ^ - ■-.. Wilson. J., Staff 

202,S INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Intermediate language skills with readings and discussion of literary texts and related materials. 
Prerequisite: Germ 201 or equivalent. 

Wilson, J., Staff 

2034^/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

204,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

206,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (6-0-6) 
♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Offered in Summer (equivalent to Germ 201 and Germ 202). 

Staff 

301,F/S SCIENTIFIC GERMAN (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Readings of reports of current scientific research in Germany, supplemented by films. Indepen- 
dent readings in the student's chosen field. Prerequisite: second year competence. Not offered 
this year. 

Wilson. J. 

302,F/S ADVANCED SCIENTIFIC GERMAN (3-0-3) 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Readings of reports of current scientific research in Germany, supplemented by films. 
Prerequisite: second year competence. Not offered this year. 

Wilson. J. 

303,F/S COMMERCIAL GERMAN (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Introduction to German economic texts and contexts useful in a subsequent international 
business career. Prerequisite: second-year competence or permission of instructor. Not offered 
this year. 

Eifler. M. 



336 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

305,F COMPOSITION & CONVERSATION I (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Based on current events, as reported in German newspapers and video documentaries. Prereq- 
uisite: second year competence. 

Eifler. M. 

306,S COMPOSITION & CONVERSATION II (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Based on current events, as reported in German newspapers and video documentaries. 
Prerequisite: second year competence. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

307,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

311,F SURVEY OF GERMAN LITERATURE I (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

An introduction to the historical development of German literature; the description, interpre- 
tation, and analysis of literature and literary trends through the nineteenth century. 

Wilson, J. 

312,S SURVEY GERMAN LITERATURE H (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

An introduction to pertinent movements and artistic works from 1900 to the present. Not 
offered this year. 

Eifler. M., W inkier, M. 

322,S SPECIAL TOPIC: GERMAN SOCIETY AND CULTURE FROM 1800 
TO THE PRESENT (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Major aspects of the political, scientific-industrial, and artistic-intellectual development of 
Central Europe will be discussed through integrated readings. Special emphasis on the German 

confrontation with modernity. .... ; 

Winkler, M. 

341,F/S THE AGE OF GOETHE (3-0 3) UAiXm 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

German classical literature ( 1 700- 1 820); emphasis changes from year to year. May be repeated 
for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

342,F/S ROMANTICISM AND REALISM (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Ninteenth-century literary tendencies related to social and political context. May be repeated 
for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

371,F/S GERMAN LITERATURE 1900-1945 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l "'' • ~ ''•'^■'^ ?* • -^ 
Concentrates on the Literature of German Expressionism and the Weimar Republ ic . Not offered 
this year. , ,, . - 

iii?.ni^onoi«izirm3qio33n9l3qmocnB3Y"t' Weissenher^er. K.. Winkler. M. 



337 

312^/S GERMAN LITERATURE SINCE 1945 (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY !.! 

Study of authors who began their careers after 1945: German, Austrian and Swiss writers. 

Eifler. M., Winkler, M. 

375,F/S GERMANY TODAY: EAST MEETS WEST (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Issues of division and reunification. Historical study of the two German states. Materials include 
documentary and literary texts, videos and films. Not offered this year. 

Eifler. M. 

378^/S NEW GERMAN CINEMA (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Critical assessment of contemporary German fimmakers, such as Fassbinder, Herzog, Kluge, 
Wenders, Dorrie, Export. Brahms. Sander, Trotta. Not offered this year. 

Eifler, M. 

381,F/S MAJOR AUTHORS OF GERMAN LITERATURE (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Mav be repeated for credit. Topic changes from year to year. Not offerd this year. 

Staff 

391,F/S SPECIAL TOPIC: GERMAN FAIRY TALE - OLD AND NEW (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

The course will discuss several prototypes from the fairy tale collection of the Brothers Grimm 
and then trace the subsequent development of the "'literary" fairy tale from Goethe and the 
Romantics to the 20th century. 

Weissenberger, K. 

392,S SPECIAL TOPIC: WOMEN AUTHORS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

German feminist literature and films will be discussed together w ith current social-political and 
journalistic opinions. 

Eifler. M. 

401,F INDEPENDENT WORK IN GERMAN LITERATURE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Qualified students work on projects of their choice under the supervision of individual 
instructors with approval of the Undergraduate Advisor. 

Staff 

402,S INDEPENDENT WORK IN GERMAN LITERATURE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Qualified students work on projects of their choice under the supervision of individual 
instructors with approval of the Undergraduate Advisor. 

Staff 

403,F SPECIAL TOPICS: HONOR THESIS (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Staff 

404,S SPECIAL TOPICS: HONOR THESIS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Wilson. J. 

4054=^/S INTRODUCTION TO GOTHIC AND OLD HIGH GERMAN (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Basic reading in language and literature. Open to graduate students for credit. Not offered this 
year. 

Wilson. J. 



338 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

41 1,F/S INTRODUCTION TO MIDDLE HIGH GERMAN (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Middle High German Language and representative works from literature of the courtly period 
(twelfth and thirteenth centuries). Open to graduate students for credit. Not offered this year. 

Clark, S. 

412,F MIDDLE HIGH GERMAN LYRIC AND EPIC POETRY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Literature of the first high point of German literary development. Texts read in the original. 
Prerequisite: Germ 411. Open to graduate students for credit. 

Clark, S. 

421J^/S GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE RENAISSANCE AND REFORMA- 
TION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Major aspects of German literature from 1400 to 1600. Open to graduate students for credit. 
Not offered this year. 

Clark, S. 

422,S GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE BAROQUE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

German literature of the seventeenth century. Open to graduate students for credit. 

Clark, S. 

431,F/S ADVANCED STYLISTICS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Analyses ofdifferent narrative styles. Prerequisite: Germ 305 or permission of instructor. Not 
offered this year. 

Weissenberger, K. 

432,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 ^ 
Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Stajf 

433,F/S LINGUISTIC STRUCTURE OF GERMAN (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Synchronic study of modem German phonology, syntax, and semantics, including aspects of 
discourse structure. Also offered as Ling 433. Not offered this year. 

Copeland, J. 

434,S HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Aspects of the history of German phonology, syntax, and semantics (with related systems) from 
its Proto-Indo-European origins to the present. Also offered as Ling 434. 



435,F TOPICS IN GERMANIC LINGUISTICS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 
Topic changes from year to year. Not offered this year. 

436,S TOPICS IN GERMANIC LINGUISTICS (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 
Topic changes from year to year. Not offerd this year. 

A ;' ' ' • -s '< I 
ifl. . .r.ii!> i' '/i !''-jr;iol ztnabi-'V. -jif.ubtiijj o) v. -e. ^^fiu^rtsl ni 



Wilson, J. 



Wilson, J. 



Wilson. J. 



339 

437,S THE INTERACTION OF GERMAN AND WENDISH (SORBIAN) IN 

TEXAS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Transliteration and Translation of 19th century manuscripts. Acquaintance with a Slavic 
language required. Also offered as Slavic 437. Not offered this year. 

Wilson, J. 

454,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

500,F/S GRADUATE RESEARCH (Credit variable) 

Graduate research and thesis in partial fulfillment for the degree of Master of Arts. 

Staff 

511,F/S GRADUATE WORK ■ GERMAN LITERATURE (Credit variable) 
With approval of the Graduate Advisor. 

Staff 

512,F/S GRADUATE INDEPENDENT WORK (Credit variable) 

With approval of the Graduate Advisor. 

Staff 

521,F/S GOTHIC (3 0-3) 

The Gothic language, its significance in Germanic subfamily, readings from the Bible 

translation of Bishop Ulfila (4th century). Not offered this year. 

Wilson , J. 

522,F/S OLD HIGH GERMAN (3 3) 

Language and literature of the Old High German period (eighth to eleventh centuries); texts 
from the pagan and the monastic traditions. Not offered this year. 

Wilson, J. 

524,F/S OLD ICELANDIC (3 3) 

The earliest Scandinavian language and literature; runic inscriptions, the prose sagas of the 
Viking era, the Eddie poetry of Germanic gods and heroes. Not offered this year. 

Wilson, J. 

526,F/S SPECIAL TOPIC: MEDIEVAL LITERATURE (3 3) 

Specific aspects and problems of medieval literature. The topics vary from year to year. May 
be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Clark, S. 

531,F/S LINGUISTIC STRUCTURE OF GERMAN (3 3) 

Synchronic study of Modern German syntax, phonology, and semantics, including discourse 
structure. Also offered as Ling 433. Not offered this year. 

Copeland, J. 

532,S HISTORY OF THE GERMAN LANGUAGE (3 3) 

Aspects of the history of German phonology, syntax, and semantics (with related systems) 
from its Proto-Indo-European origins to the present. Also offered as Germ 434. 

Wilson, J. 

561,F/S LITERARY THEORY (3 3) 

Introduction to the major modes of criticism. Not offered this year. 

Staff 



340 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

562,S GERMAN CULTURAL AND SOCIAL THEORY (3-0-3) ^^ ^'^' 

A survey of historically relevant theories of society and culture from Nietzsche to Habermas, 
including selections from G. Simmel. G. Lukacs, W. Benjamin, B. Brecht, Th. W. Adomo, J. 
Habermas and other members of the "Frankfurt School." Special emphasis will be placed on the 
interdependence of social analysis, aesthetic theory, and evaluative interpretation of art/ 
literature. Should there be significant student interest from other departments, the seminar will 
be taught in English. 

Winkler. M. 

563,F SEMINAR IN LITERARY GENRES (3-0-3) . 
Aspects of German poetry. 

Weissenberger. K. 

565,F SPECIAL TOPICS: CONTEMPORARY GERMAN LITERATURE 

(3-0-3) 
Topic changes from year to year. The course will discuss authors such as Thomas Bemhard, 
Friedrich Delius, Max Frisch, Botho StrauB, Peter Weiss, etc. 

. . Winkler. M. 

566,S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

571,F TURN OF THE CENTURY LITERATURE (3-0-3) 
Specific aspects, problems, and authors of the period. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

572,S TURN OF THE CENTURY LITERATURE (3-0-3) 
Specific aspects, problems, and authors of the period. Not offered this year. 

Winkler. M. 
,0 9ri3 to 1 

578,S NEW GERMAN CINEMA (3-0-3) 

Critical assessment of contemporary German filmmakers, such as Fassbinder, Herzog, Kluge, 
Wenders, Dorrie, Export, Brahms, Sander, and Trotta. Not offered this year. 

Eifler. M. 

591,F CULTURAL DEBATES DURING THE GERMAN REUNIFICATION 

(3-0-3) 
Issues of division and reunification. Historical study of Germany after 1945. Materials include 
documentary and literary texts, videos and films. Enriched version of Germ 375. Not offered 
this year. 

Eifler. M. 

592,S SELECTED PROBLEMS IN MODERN LITERATURE (3-0 3) 
Extensive reading of contemporary women writers and feminist criticism. Authors: Bachmann, 
Frischmuth, Jelinek, Maron, Morgner, and Wolf. 

Eifler. M. 

600,F/S GRADUATE RESEARCH (Credit variable)L^ , YJT^T^fW ? '. 

With the approval of the Graduate Advisor. n . 1 ; i>* » :• 

Staff 

700,F/S GRADUATE SUMMER RESEARCH (Credit vaiiable) 
With the approval of the Graduate Advisor. 

Staff 



' ■ > : 341 

800,F/S GRADUATE RESEARCH (Credit variable) 

Graduate research and dissertation in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of 

Doctor of Philosophy. 

•-,. ^...;o., :.n^ ■ - . ,. ^ ■ .. ;. Staff 

German Culture Studies (Taught in English) 

313,F/S NATIONAL SOCIALISM AND EXILE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Also satisfies Coherent Minor. Critical discussions of life under German fascism and the 
survival of German culture in exile. Not offered this vear. 

Winkler. M. 

314,F/S WEIMAR REPUBLIC AND THE AVANT-GARDE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Also satisfies Coherent Minor. An intensive survey of the distinct complexity of Germany's 
intellectual-artistic, cultural, and socio-political life from 1918-1933. Not offered this year. 

Winkler, M. 

321,F/S VIKING LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION (3-0-3) - 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.I 

The medieval literature of Scandinavia, especially Iceland. The heroic prose of the sagas: 
Germanic mythology and the Nibelungen cycle in the Poetic Edda; runic inscriptions. Not 
offered this year. ..... 

' -.ji.' ._• * ■ ' . Wilson, J. 

351,F SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Topic changes from vear to year. Mav be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

352,S SPECIAL TOPICS (3() 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Topic chanees from vear to vear. Mav be repeated for credit. Not offered this vear. 

Staff 

361,F/S DISCOURSE IN ALIENATION: FROM KAFKA TO THE HOLO- 
CAUST (1910-1945) (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Also satisfies Coherent Minor. The socio-political and economic upheaval on the one hand and 
the religious and intellectual one on the other which mark this period, manifest themselves in 
literature between the poles of artistic experimentation (expressionism, KalT^a, Musil) and a 
forced ideological stabilization ( fascism ); holocaust literature reflects the ultimate clash between 
these principles. Not offered this year. 

Weissenherger, K. 

362,F/S SPECIAL TOPIC: MODERN GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANS- 
LATION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic chanaes from year to year. Mav be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

376,F/S GERMANY TODAY: EAST MEETS WEST (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORYI.l 

Also satisfies Coherent Minor. Issues of division and reunification. Historical study of 
Germany after 1945. Materials include documentary and literary texts, videos and films. Not 
offered this year. 

Eifler, M. 



342 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

391,F/S NEW GERMAN CINEMA (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Also satisfies Coherent Minor. Critical assessment of contemporary German filmmakers, such 
as Fassbinder, Herzog, Kluge, Wenders, Dorrie, Export, Brahms, Sander, and Trotta. Not 
offered this year. 

Eifler. M. 

392,S SPECIAL TOPIC : GERMAN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION 

(3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 



401,F SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 



402,S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 



Stajf 



Staff 



Staff 



406,F/S MAJOR TRENDS IN GERMAN LITERATURE FROM THE 

MIDDLE AGES THROUGH ENLIGHTENMENT IN TRANSLATION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Clark, S. 

407,F/S GERMAN LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES IN TRANSLA- 
TION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 
Topic changes from year to year. Not offered this year. 

Clark. S. 

Swedish Courses 

101,F ELEMENTARY SWEDISH (3- 1 -4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Rapid progression from elementary work to challenging readings, such as the social-critical 
stories of Nobel Prize winner Par Lagerkvist. Supplemented by tapes. 

Wilson. J. 

102,S ELEMENTARY SWEDISH (3- 1 -4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Prerequisite: Swed 101 . Several Bergman films will be studied. Supplemented by readings and 
tapes in Norwegian, Danish, and Icelandic. 

Wilson. J. 



\i. .x>^^\ 



- 343 

Slavic Studies ^ ^ -^ 

Degrees offered: B.h.. ' ' . 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Undergraduate Program. At least 24 semester hours (eight courses) offered in 
fulfillment of major requirements must be numbered 300 or higher. Double majors 
may be allowed to take 18 semester hours (six courses numbered 300 or higher) with 
the approval of the Department and should consult with the Slavic Studies staff to 
arrange a program compatible with the other major. Four of the courses may be 
language courses with the remainder literature or culture; these may be chosen by the 
student with the adviser's consent. All departmental majors must have their programs 
approved by the representative of the Department. 

No Russian is required for nonmajors who wish to take courses in Slavic or 
Russian Literature. Lectures and readings are in English. Majors are required to read 
some of the works and to write assigned papers in Russian. 

Scholarships: Available for Slavic language studies from the Dr. and Mrs. Earl 
Douglas Mitchell Fellowship Fund. 

Slavic Courses 

101,F BEGINNING SLAVIC LANGUAGE (3 1-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

NOTE: 102 must be completed to receive distribution credit for 101. 

Introductory study of a Slavic language other than Russian (Polish, Czech, Ukrainian) with 

emphasis on speaking and reading. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

102,S BEGINNING SLAVIC LANGUAGE (3-1-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Prerequisite is Slavic 101. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

101,F ELEMENTARY POLISH I (3-1-4) 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Introductory study of Polish with emphasis on speaking and reading. Polish 102 must be 
completed to receive distribution credit. Not offered this vear. 

' Staff 

102,S ELEMENTARY POLISH II (3 14) ; w 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGROY I.l 

Study of Polish with emphasis on speaking and reading. Polish 101 must be completed to 
receive distribution credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

242,F DRAMA I (3 3) 

May be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor required. Not offered this year. 

Hill. A. 

242,S DRAMA H (3-0-3) 

May be repeated for credit. Permission of instructor required. Not offered this year. 

Hill. A. 



344 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

320,S SLAVIC CULTURES (3-0-3). ♦^ V. . '"^ 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Development of Slavic cultures, with emphasis on the history of ideas. 

...-S. ...v^e,-. .--,, T^oitDU^ Thompson, E. 

41 1,F/S CONTEMPORARY RUSSIA: CULTURE IN ITS POLITICAL 

CONTEXT (3 3) 
*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Study of Soviet Russia, with emphasis on the 1980s and the changing status of Russia within 
the world community. No knowledge of Russian required. Not offered this year. 

Thompson, E. 

412,F/S AND THE WALLS CAME TUMBLING DOWN: THE RISE OF '[ 
EASTERN EUROPE IN THE 1980s (3 3) „istn5/9ia3 s 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 . - H- 

Study of changes in Eastern Europe in the 1980s. Emphasis on literature and politics. No 
knowledge of Russian required. Not offered this year. 

422,F/S CONSERVATIVE AUTHORS AND READINGS (3-0-3) 
*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Study of conservative responses to major modem and postmodern thinkers. Readings include 
Mortimer Adler, Hannah Arendt, Leszek Kolakowski, Czeslaw Milosz, Alexander Solzhenitsyn. 
Karl Popper, Thomas Molnar, Jacques Maritain, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Zbigniew Brzezinski. 
Familiarity with or additional readings in Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, G.W.F. Hegel, 
and Karl Marx will also be required. Not offered this year. 

Thompson. E. 

436,F/S TOPICS IN SLAVIC LINGUISTICS (3 3) ^ b«8 gm a 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

The Old Church Slavic language in its Indo-European, Balto-Slavic and Slavic contexts with 
emphasis on translation and analysis of representative Glagolitic and Cyrillic texts. Also 
offered as Ling 436. Not offered this year. 

Jones, R. 



437,F/S THE INTERACTION OF GERMAN AND WENDISH (SORBIAN) IN 

TEXAS (3-0-3) hflL\r> '[ 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Transliteration and translation of 19th century manuscripts. Acquaintance with a Slavic 
language required. Also offered as Germ 437. Not offered this year. 

Wilson. J. 

450,F/S INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 3). *! 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Qualified students may conduct research and write a paper on a topic of particular interest. 

Staff 

Russian Courses (L-O-c)l 4 

101,F ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN I (3 2-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

NOTE: 1 02 must be completed to receive dist. credit for 101. Fundamentals of Russian grammar. 
Pronunciation, reading, oral practice, and translation. 

Hill. A. ..I ones. R. 

102,S ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN II (3 2 4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Fundamentals of Russian urammar. Pronunciation, reading, oral practice, and translation. See 
Russ 101. 

Hill, A. 



103,S ELEMENTARY RUSSIAN II (6 2 8) 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Offered in Summer (equivalent to Russ 101 and Russ 102). 



105,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3 2 4) . 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l ' 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 



106,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-2-4) 

^DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 



201,F INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN I (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Grammar review, reading of selected texts, conversation, and composition. 



345. 



Stajf 



Staff 



Staff 



Jones. R. 



202,S INTERMEDIATE RUSSIAN II (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Grammar review, reading of selected texts, conversation, and composition. See Russ 201. 

Hill. A. 

301,F CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION I (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l ' " ^ 
Emphasis on composition and conversation with reading of relevant texts. 

Hill. A. 

302,S CONVERSATION & COMPOSITION II (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Emphasis on composition and conversation with reading of relevant texts. See Russ 301. 

... ■ ._. Hill. A. 

311,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) 

^DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic changes from vear to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

312,F/S SURVEY OF RUSSIAN LITERATURE (3-0 3) 5; ; i 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Comprehensive survey of Russian literature from the 18th century to the Soviet period. No 
knowledge of Russian required. Not offered this year. 

•^' •' u- Thompson. E. 

320,S SLAVIC CULTURES (3 3) 

*DlSTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Development of Slavic cultures, with emphasis on the history of ideas. 

Thompson. E. 
\ ■■■'■' • ^ ' 

341,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3 3) 
*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 
Topic chanaes from vear to vear. Mav be repeated for credit. Not offered this vear. 

Staff 

342,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0-3) 

'■DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic changes from year to year. Mav be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 



346 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

351,F TOLSTOY (3-0-3) c^wi i/ai»>ihi YflATi/f^M>!J?! ?Jj: 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Study of the major works of Tolstoy. No knowledge of Russian required. Not offered this year.* 
,,^„ ^ Thompson. E. 

352JF DOSTOEVSKY (3-0-3) i 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 
No knowledge of Russian required. 

Thompson, E. 

401,F RUSSIAN STYLISTICS I (3-0-3) ^ 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Designed to improve the spoken and written language with emphasis on syntactic and idiomatic 
structures. Weekly papers required. 

Thompson, E. 

402,S RUSSIAN STYLISTICS II (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Designed to improve the spoken and written language with emphasis on syntactic and idiomatic 
structures. Weekly papers required. 

Thompson, E. 

411,F/S RUSSIAN LITERATURE OF THE SOVIET PERIOD (3-0-3) rt 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATGEORY I.l 

Topic changes from year to year. Not offered this year. 

412,F/S SOLZHENITSYN AND THE DISSIDENTS (3-0 3) 
*D1STRIBUTI0N COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Study of the life and works of Solzhenitsyn and of the dissident movement in post-Stalin 
Russia. No knowledge of Russian required. Topic changes from year to year. Not offered this 
year. 

Staff 
1 
4204^/S WOMEN IN RUSSIAN LITERATURE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

The portrayal of women in major works of Russian literature. No knowledge of Russian required. 
Not offered this year. 

Thompson, Et 

441,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3-0 3) 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l I 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

t»l<i 4bon '-■■;. ^1 *"f I '■' ^^ 03' vMJff"*'J i^* ^^^ff 

442,F/S SPECIAL TOPICS (3 0-3) 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Topic changes from year to year. May be repeated for credit. Not offered this year. 

Staff 

450,F/S INDEPENDENT STUDY (3 3) 
♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Qualified students may conduct research and write a paper on a topic of particular interest. ^ 

Staff 

- -■ '■-''■■ 1/ '■ ■ 
; ■■ \ , ^ 



"m^ 



,t.'i 



347 

Hispanic and Classical Studies 



- Associate Professor Urrutibeheity, Chair 

Professors Castaneda and Leal 
Associate Professors Kauffmann, Perez, Rea, Wallace, Yamal and Yunis 
Lecturers Daichman, Eaker, and Kiperman 

Degrees Offered: B.A. and M.A. in Spanish; B.A. in Classics* 

Study is offered in Classics, Greek, Latin, Portuguese, and Spanish. A fully 
equipped language laboratory is in operation. Laboratory work is required of students 
in the beginning classes of all modem languages. 

Qualified upperclass students may engage in independent work at the discretion 
of the department. . . , 

*For information on curriculum in Classics please see separate section in catalog. 



Spanish 

Undergraduate Program. A student majoring in Spanish may ipursue the 
following options: ( 1 ) language, (2) literature, or (3) Latin American studies. For an 
option in language or literature, 30 semester hours (ten courses) offered in fulfillment 
of major requirements must be Spanish courses numbered 300 or higher. For an option 
in Latin American studies, a minimum of 18 semester hours (six courses) in Spanish 
courses numbered 300 or higher must be taken, plus six semester hours (two courses) 
of Portuguese, and at least 12 semester hours (four courses) related to the Latin 
American field in other departments. Qualified upperclass students are offered an 
opportunity to earn up to six semester hours in independent work. For specific 
requirements as to courses and the sequence to be followed, see the departmental 
advisers. All majors must have their programs approved by the department. 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must also 
satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours 
outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 semester 
hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-90. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts: 

1 . Completion with high standing of a program approved by the department; 
normally, this includes 24 semester hours in advanced courses plus six 
semester hours of thesis work. 

2. Satisfactory performance on a reading examination in one foreign language 
other than Spanish approved by the department. 

3. Satisfactory performance on a written comprehensive examination in Span- 
ish, which tests the student's competence in the chosen area of specialization 
and in the remaining areas of Hispanic literature and linguistics. 

4. One semester of college Latin or equivalent. 

5. One semester of "Teaching College Spanish" and practice teaching. 

6. Completion of an acceptable thesis. 

7. Satisfactory performance on a final oral examination on the thesis. 



348 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

,r. r r..f -n/ . I Summcr PrograiTi Ih Spajo '^^ ^"r. -^~-r~'} 

The Department of Hispanic and Classical Studies offers an annual 6-week 
Summer Program in Spain. Rice students in good standing are eligible to take two 
courses for credit (6 hours). The program, which began in 1973, was the first of its kind 
established in Houston. Program participants live with Spanish families and attend 
classes daily (M-F) in the mornings. On weekends, they visit Spanish cities of artistic 
and historic interest. Courses range from second-year to graduate level. Students are 
granted Rice credit for courses successfully completed. Brochures and application 
materials are available in the Department Office. 

Fall Semester in Chile 

The Department of Hispanic and Classical Studies offers a Fall Semester in Chile 
in conjunction with the University of Chile in Santiago. Rice students in good standing 
are eligible for this program. Since its inception in 1989 the program has attracted 
many students from universities all over the U.S. Students may take a variety of 
courses through the University of Chile in Santiago. Brochures and application 
materials are available in the Department Office. '' ^'■''""^* ■ 



Spanish Courses , ,.,,,^<| s^guh.; it,-,-,!,/^ ' ' 

101,F/S FIRST YEAR SPANISH (3 14) 'fiid):2 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE; CATEGORY 1. 1 

NOTE: 102 must be completed to receive dist. credit for 101. Introduction to the study of the 
Spanish language with emphasis on the development of audiolingual skills. Language laboratory 
work required. 

Staff 

102,F/S FIRST YEAR SPANISH (3 I 4) o 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Continuation of Span 101. ,. ' ' , .' 

d bsvo-jqqs ^mjiigOTq iiadl t^vsn. uw- ^^^rr 

103,F ACCELERATED BEGINNING SPANISH (6 2 8) i^'^fi^ 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Double course comparable to Span 101, 102 designed to achieve m one semester maximum 
proficiency in spoken language. Five classes a week, language lab twice a week. Not offered 
1992-93. 

Hans:. I., Daichman. C 

201,F/S SECOND YEAR SPANISH (3 14) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY !. 1 D^;'<fitr.'r5i isr, V-/ai 
Contemporary short stories and essays provide current linguistii: models and serve as the point 
of departure for class conversation and discussion. Thorough grammar review. 

Kauffmann. R. 

202,F/S SECOND YEAR SPANISH (3 1 4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 
Continuation of Span 20 1 . 

■9i< ■ »" "««^ Kauffmann. R. 

■ .ieaimfixs Ifiio Uiii i.'O ncA 



^': .. 349 

204,S ACCELERATED INTERMEDIATE SPANISH (6 2 8) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

Continuation of Span 103 comparable to Span 201. 202. Contemporary short stories provide 
current linguistic models and serve as the point of departure for class conversation and 
discussion. Not offered 1992-93. 

Daichman. G., Hansz, I. 

304,F/S LATIN- AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 

Selected works of outstanding writers from Latin America. Readings and class discussions in 
English. Open to all students. 

Re a. J. 

305,F INTERMEDIATE SPANISH: LEGAL AND COMMERCIAL (3 3) 

Introduction to general business and legal practices and terminology useful in subsequent 
business or legal career. Prerequisite: Second-year proficiency or permission of instructor. 

Kiperman. A. 

306,S INTERMEDIATE SPANISH: MEDICAL (3 3) 

Introduction to general medical terminology and the reading of medical texts and journals. 
Useful in subsequent medical career. Prerequisite: second year proficiency or permission of 
instructor. Not offered 1992-93. 

-■.- :,')>•' - ■ ■ Kiperman 

311,F ADVANCED SPANISH (3-0-3 each semester) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Third-year course designed primarily to improve spoken language. Emphasis is on new 
vocabulary and idioms, morphology, syntax, and mechanisms of interference. 

312,S ADVANCED SPANISH (3-0-3 each semester) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Third-year course designed primarily to improve spoken language. Emphasis is on new 
vocabulary and idioms, morphology, syntax, and mechanisms of interference. 

Stajf 

315,F STUDIES IN HISPANIC LINGUISTICS (3 3) 

Topics vary: history of the Spanish language. Old Spanish, Spanish-American dialectology. 

Urrutiheheity, H. 

319,F SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

The history of Spanish literature through representative readings from the medieval period to the 
present. Emphasis on stylistic analysis. Not offered 1992-93. 

Perez, J. 

320,S SURVEY OF SPANISH LITERATURE (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Same as 319. Not offered 1992-93. 

Perez. J. 

321,F SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

The main literary trends and outstanding writers m Spanish America. 

Rea,J..Yamal,R. 



350 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

322,S SURVEY OF SPANISH-AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

The main literary trends and outstanding writers in Spanish America. 

Rea.J.. Yamal.R. 

323,F HISPANIC CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Topics relating to the development of social, political, and economic institutions of Spain form 
the basis for extensive conversation, discussion, and composition. 

Perez, J. 

324,S CULTURE AND CIVILIZATION OF LATIN AMERICA (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

The development of social, political, and economic institutions of Latin America forms the basis 
for extensive conversation, discussion, and composition. 

Yamal, R. 

341,F MODERN SPANISH LITERATURE (3 3 each semester) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 
Topics vary. 

Kauffmann. R.. Perez. J. 

342,S MODERN SPANISH LITERATURE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 
Same as 341. 

Kauffmann, R. Perez, J. 

352,F ADVANCED SPANISH COMPOSITION (3 3) 

Designed to strengthen written rhetorical skills by using such materials as literary texts and 
current periodicals. Not offered 1992-93. 

Yamal. R. 

361,F STUDIES IN GOLDEN AGE DRAMA (3 0-3 each semester) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Development of the "comedia," illustrated by selected works of Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, 
Ruiz de Alarcon, and other seventeenth-century playwrights. Topics vary. 

Castaneda, J. 

362,S GOLDEN AGE DRAMA (3-0-3 each semester) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Development of the "comedia," illustrated by selected works of Calderon de la Barca and other 
seventeenth-century playwrights. Not offered 1992-93. 

'f;'.' '/^^;L Castaneda. J. 

381,F PROSE AND LYRIC POETRY OF THE GOLDEN AGE (3 0-3 each 

semester) 
Analysis of poetry and prose emphasizing mysticism, the development of lyric poetry from 
Garcilaso to Gongora, the picaresque novel, and Cervantes' Don Quixote, Part I. Offered 
alternate years. Not offered 1992-93. 

Castaneda, J. 

382,S PROSE AND LYRIC POETRY OF THE GOLDEN AGE (3 3 each 

semester) 
Analysis of poetry and prose emphasizing development of the Baroque, and Cervantes' Don 
Quixote, Part II. Offered alternate years. Not offered 1992-93. 

Castaneda, J. 



351 

403,F ADVANCED SPANISH THROUGH MEDIA (3 3) 

Course for advanced undergraduates. Emphasis on perfecting listening comprehension and 
speaking ability. Topics for oral expression developed from selected Spanish-language films to 
be viewed in class. 

Daichman, G. 

405,F SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE (3-0 3 each semester) 
* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Topic: Romanticism and Naturalism in Spanish American Literature. Not offered 1992-93. 

Yamal. R. 

406,S STUDIES IN SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 3 each semes- 
ter) 
Masterpieces of contemporary Spanish-American literature. 

Rea,J.,Yamal,R. 

418,S MEDIEVAL SPANISH LITERATURE (3 3) 

Three medieval masterpieces: Cantor de mio Cid, Lihro de buen amor, and La Celestina. 

Leal M. 

420,S LITERARY SEMIOTICS (3 3 ) 

Application of semiotic models to the study of literature. Topics vary. Also offered as Ling 
420. Not offered 1992-93. 

Kaujfmann. R. 

421,F INDEPENDENT WORK (3-0 3) 

Hispanic literature, Hispanic linguistics, and Hispanic culture and civilization. Reserved for 
qualified juniors and seniors who are particularly interested in a topic not covered in other 
courses. Prerequisite: permission of the department. 

Staff 

422,S INDEPENDENT WORK (3-0-3) 

Hispanic literature, Hispanic linguistics, and Hispanic culture and civilization. Reserved for 
qualified juniors and seniors who are particularly interested in a topic not covered in other 
courses. Prerequisite: permission of the department. 

Staff 

423,F LINGUISTIC STRUCTURE OF SPANISH (3 0-3) 

A synchronic study of modem Spanish phonology. Special attention given to Hispanic-American 

variants. Also offered as Ling 423. Not offered 1992-93. 

Urrutibeheity, H. 

424,S LINGUISTIC STRUCTURE OF SPANISH (3-0-3) 

A synchronic study of modem Spanish morphology and syntax. Not offered 1992-93. 

Urrutibeheity, H. 

435,F ART AND MECHANICS OF TRANSLATION (3-0-3) 
Not offered 1992-93. 

Daichman, G. 

450,S HISPANIC DRAMA PRACTICUM (4 0-4) 

Critical reading and performance of modern Spanish and Latin American plays. Prerequisite: 

approval of instructor. Not offered 1992-93. 

YamaL R. 

507,F TEACHING COLLEGE SPANISH (10 1) 

Teaching methods and techniques, test preparation, and evaluation. One hour per week of 
discussion. Students observe language classes for three weeks and teach for three weeks. 
Required for graduate students. Not offered 1992-93. 

Urrutibeheity, //. 



352 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

51 1,S METHODS OF RESEARCH IN HISPANIC LITERATURE (3-0-3) 
Theoretical and practical course for beginning graduate students. Emphasis on techniques of 
stylistic and linguistic analysis and on the bibliographical resources in the field. Not offered 
1992-93. 

(C\ Yamal, R. 

515,F STUDIES IN HISPANIC LINGUISTICS (3-0-3) 

Topics: History of the Spanish Language, Spanish American Dialectology, Old Spanish. 

Urrutibeheity. H. 

516,S STUDIES IN HISPANIC LINGUISTICS (3-0-3) 

May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Also offered as Ling 516. •■ ' 

Urrutibeheity, H. 

518,S STUDIES IN MEDIEVAL SPAN. LIT. (3 0-3) 

Cantar de mio Cid, Lihro de huen amor. La Celestina 

J H2I/iA^8 JA /3IU3I/L^a/. M. 

520,S STUDIES IN LITERARY SEMIOTICS (3 0-3) 

Application of semiotic models to the study of literature. Topics vary. Not offered 1992-93. 

Kauffmann, R. 

523,F STUDIES IN GOLDEN AGE THEATRE (3 0-3) OQI t>3i3l1o JoH Oil^ 

Seminar topic for 1992-93: the Don Juan theme in Spanish literature. 

Castaneda. J. 

524,S STUDIES IN GOLDEN AGE THEATRE (3 3) H 

The School of Calderon de la Barca. Not offered 1992-93. 

noieeinnsiq •£ Castaneda. J. 

525,F GOLDEN AGE PROSE (3 0-3) 

Don Quijote, Part I. Not offered 1992-93. ' ''' ' " "^ '' ■'^•' * ' "' 

Castaneda, J. 

526,S GOLDEN AGE PROSE (3-0-3) l^izlup 

Don Quijote. Part IL Not offered 1992-93. 

_ _ __ Castaneda. J. 

535,S THE SPANISH ESSAY FROM 1700 TO PRESENT (3 0-3) '^ 

Topic: Spanish essayism from Larra to Ortega y Gasset. 

Kajfmann, R. 

541,F STUDIES IN MODERN SPANISH LITERATURE (3-0-3) -^ 

Not offered 1992-93. 

Kauffmann. R. 

542,S MODERN SPANISH LITERATURE (3-0-3) 
Topics vary. 

"' • ■'■ ' Kauffmann. R. Perez. J. 

555,F STUDIES IN SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 3) 

Topics vary. 

Rea,. f. Yamal. R. 

556,S SPANISH AMERICAN LITERATURE (3 3) ^^^ _^ 

Topics vary. 



Rea. J.. Yamal R. 



S\ .Y\rjtvi<\i\a> \V. 



. :,- •aT.-:^:-' 353 

591,F INDEPENDENT STUDY (Variable each semester) ,i ., 

592,S INDEPENDENT STUDY (Variable each semester) 

Staff 

700,F RESEARCH LEADING TO CANDIDACY (Variable each semester) 

Staff 

702,S RESEARCH LEADING TO CANDIDACY (Variable each semester) 
Topics in Spanish and Latin American literary theory and Spanish Linguistics. To be taken after 
a student has completed departmental course requirements for the Master's Degree and before 
being admitted to candidacy. 

^Staff 

800,F RESEARCH AND THESIS (Variable each semester) 

Staff 

800,S THESIS RESEARCH (Variable each semester) 

Staff 

Portuguese Courses 

101,F FIRST- YEAR PORTUGUESE (3 14) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

NOTE: 102 must be completed to receive dist. credit for 101. Introduction to the study of the 
Portuguese language with emphasis on development of audiolingual skills. Language laboratory 
work required. 

Leal.M..Rea.J. 

102,S FIRST-YEAR PORTUGUESE (3 14) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 

Introduction to the study of the Portuguese language with emphasis on development of 
audiolingual skills. Language laboratory work required. 

Leal. M. 

201,F SECOND- YEAR PORTUGUESE (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1. 1 
Not offered 1992-93. 

Rea.J. 

202,F/S SECOND- YEAR PORTUGUESE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 
Not offered 1992-93. 

LeaiM. 

400,F/S INDEPENDENT STUDY (0 3) 

Reserved for qualified students who wish to work on a topic not covered m other courses. 
Prerequisite: permission of the department. ■ 

, Lcal.M. 



;, ,^ , Classics 

See "Classics" section page 246. 



354 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

History '^^^' 



^^'•'^ Professor Wiener, Chair 

Professors Boles, Drew, Gruber, Haskell, Hyman, Loewenheim, 
Matusow, Odhiambo, R.J. Smith, Stokes, Van Helden, and Wolin 
Associate Professors Cox, Maas, Sanders and Seed 
^ . Assistant Professors Fishman, Nirenberg and Quillen 

VtG Degrees Ojfered: B.A.. M.A., Ph.D. - 

Undergraduate Program. A student majoring in history must take a minimum 
of 30 semester hours (ten courses) in history, of which 1 8 semester hours (six courses) 
must be on the advanced level (300 or 400). Two of the student's advanced courses 
must be chosen from a departmental list of seminars/colloquia devoted mainly to 
writing and discussion. In addition, students are expected to distribute their ten courses 
over four fields: 

I. Ancient-Medieval: one course minimum 
- . , II. Modem Europe: two courses minimum - ^ 

' *...' III. United States: two courses minimum 

IV. Asia, Latin America, Africa: one course minimum 

History majors also are advised to acquaint themselves with humanistic disci- 
plines other than history (for example, literature, fine arts, and philosophy) and also 
with social sciences such as political science, sociology, economics, and anthropology, 
whose contributions to historical studies are vital. Some foreign language proficiency 
is desirable for a history major, and the department highly recommends that students 
contemplating graduate work in history study at least one foreign language in some 
depth (most graduate schools require a reading knowledge of French and German for 
the Ph.D. degree). 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must also 
satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours 
outside the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 semester 
hours. See Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-90. 

GraduateProgram. Graduate students in history are accepted for study leading 
to either the M.A. or Ph.D. Holders of the B.A. degree (or its equivalent) from an 
acceptable institution are eligible to apply. The graduate program is designed to train 
a limited number of carefully selected students. Both the M.A. and the Ph.D. degrees 
are offered in limited areas of American, European and other history. Further 
information about the fields may be obtained on request from the department. 

Graduate fellowships as well as graduate scholarships within the limits of 
available funds are awarded to qualified students with demonstrated ability. Fellow- 
ships include a stipend and a waiver of tuition; scholarships provide a waiver of tuition 
only. As a part of their training, graduate students are expected to render limited 
services to the department as tutorial instructors, as research assistants, or as assistants 
to the editors of the Journal of Southern History or The Papers of Jefferson Davis, 
both of which are sponsored by Rice University. 

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts. Students pursuing the M.A. 
degree are expected to complete a certain amount of formal class or seminar work (at 
least 24 semester hours); take one graduate seminar; and write a thesis under the 
direction of an advisory committee of the department headed by a professor having 



F 



355 

special competence in the subject area of the thesis. An oral defense of the thesis is also 
required. Completion of these requirements usually takes two years. Not more than 
three years may elapse between the time the student is admitted to graduate study and 
the completion of the degree, unless an extension is approved by the departmental 
graduate committee. An alternate M.A. degree is available to doctoral students who 
fulfill the special requirements set by the department. 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Students pursuing a 
doctoral program are expected to prepare themselves in three fields of history. At least 
two of the three fields must be in the student's major area of concentration ( European, 
U.S., or other history). The third field must be in an area not included in the first two 
fields; e.g., if the major area is European history the third area must be in U.S. or other 
non-European history. If the area is U.S. history the third area must be in European 
or other non-U. S. history. Students who wish to make their third area in a field outside 
the History Department should petition the Graduate Committee by the end of their 
second semester. 

In general it is expected that the student will prepare thoroughly in the field taken 
with his or her advisor, and broadly in the other two fields. This normally includes 
course work, directed reading, and a substantial amount of independent reading. As 
part of this course work students are required to take two graduate seminars and two 
graduate colloquia (one each in European and U.S. history). The department has no 
specific requirements for the number of hours that must be completed, but Ph.D. 
students are expected to remain full-time students from their entry into the program 
until they pass their qualifying examination. The qualifying examination usually is 
oral, though it may be written or both written and oral at the discretion of the 
department. It is given only after the student has completed all necssary course and 
seminar work and passed reading examinations in the principle language of research 
(unless it is English) and one other language (not English). The qualifying examina- 
tion for students entering with a B.A. is normally scheduled during the fifth semester 
and must be completed by the beginning of the sixth semester. Students who entered 
with the M.A. should take their qualifying examination during their third semester at 
Rice and no later than the beginning of their fifth semester.* In addition to the foreign 
language examinations and the qualifying examination, the Ph.D candidate must 
present a dissertation embodying the results of original research and defend it in a 
public oral examination. The dissertation must be completed within three calendar 
years after passing the qualifying examination, unless an extension is granted by the 
departmental graduate committee. 

*Passing the qualifying examination allows the student to apply for formal 
admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree. 

■ - ■AajKi3^':Aj/A,'^:-'i History 

History Courses ; ■■,-''\i'^ ■.. ' .. '..•■■- "u- 

101,F EUROPE'S FIVE HUNDRED YEARS, 1450-1815 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

How was the world so thoroughly reshaped by the European experience? A comprehensive 
attempt to answer that question. Recommended for Freshman and Sophomores. Offered with 
additional work as Hist 301. 

Stokes. G. 



356 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

102,S EUROPE'S FIVE HUNDRED YEARS, 1815-PRESENT (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Continuation of Hist 101. Both courses can be taken separately. Recommended for Freshmen 
and Sophomores. Offered with additional work as Hist 302. 

Stokes, G.. 

105,F VARIETIES OF THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE I (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The course theme this semester is American Military Institutions and Professionals in a 
Constitutional Democracy, 1770s- 1990s. Lectures and discussions of required readings will 
explore major civil-military interactions on all levels of the federal system. 

Hyman, H. 



106,S VARIETIES OF THE AMERICAN EXPERIENCE II (3 3) 

Interpretive approaches to American history. Not offered 1992-93. 



Staff 



152,S FRESHMAN SEMINAR IN ANCIENT HISTORY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The Hero and his Companion from Gilgamesh to Sam Spade. How does presentation of heroic 
action illustrate the basic values of a society? Through consideration as historical sources of 
several ancient texts, modem mystery stories, and two "western" movies, we will see the 
development of a style of community service that links heroism with alienation. The extent to 
which women participate will be traced. Interested students must see Professor Maas by the end 
of the Fall semester. Limited enrollment. Not offered 1992-93. 

Maas, M. 

154,S LIFE OF MUHAMMAD (Freshman seminar) (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An examination of the life of the Prophet Muhammad in the context of Islamic history and the 
growth of Islamic tradition, as well as the Western view of Muhammad and Islam. We will be 
reading classical and modem Arabic biographies of Muhammad in translation as well as some 
Western polemical treatises on Muhammad and the responses to them from the Islamic world. 
(Limited to 15 students). Not offered 1992-93. 

Sanders, P. 

160,S FRESHMAN SEMINAR: JEFFERSON AND THE ORIGINS OF THE 
AMERICAN REPUBLIC (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This freshman seminar considers one of the most talented of our founding fathers - a man who 
helped define our revolutionary ideals, diplomacy, and politics as well as our public lands, 
domestic architecture, religion, slavery, and education. Readings, discussions, and essays. 
Enrollment limited to eighteen. Not offered 1992-93. 

Gruber, I. 



201,S INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN CIVILIZA- 
TIONS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An interdisciplinary introduction to the great cultural traditions of ancient Mediterranean: 
Mesopotamia and Israel, Greece, the Hellenistic world, Rome, Early Christianity; Literary, 
Historical, philosophical and religious texts. 

Yunis. H. 

202,F MEDIEVAL HISTORY 1(3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Early Middle Ages: From the Visigoths to the Normans. 

Nirenberg, D. 



357 

203,S MEDIEVAL HISTORY 11(3-0-3) > 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 
Hign Middle Ages: From 1000 AD to 1492 AD 

Nirenherg. D. 

206,F INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN CIVILIZATIONS (3 3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Introduction to the great cultural traditions of Asia, past and present, with emphasis on evolving 
religious and philosophical traditions, artistic and literary achievements, and patterns of 
political, social, and economic change. (Also Hu. 211) 

Smith. R.J.. Wilson. R.L.. Klein, A. 

211,F AMERICAN THOUGHT AND SOCIETY I (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

A topical introductory survey of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century American history, prima- 
rily concerned with intellectual and social developments underlying the surface of events. 
Offered with additional work as History 311. 

Haskell. T. 

212,S AMERICAN THOUGHT AND SOCIETY H (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A topical introductory survey of nineteenth and twentieth century American history, primarily 
concerned with intellectual and social developments underlying the surface of events. Offered 
with additional work as Hist 312. 

•'.- • -^ ... - ■ Haskell. T. 

213,S SLAVERY IN NORTH AMERICA (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An interdisciplinary examination of all aspects of United States slavery, from the African 
background through emancipation. Offered with additional work as Hist 413. Not offered 
1992-93. 

Boles. J. 

214,F HISTORY OF RELIGION IN AMERICA (3 3) 

A survey of American religious history from the Pilgrims and Puritans to the New Age and New 
Right. In addition to a traditional introduction to the topic, readings and discussions will 
emphasize new historical approaches to popular Religion, Civil Religion, and alternative 
Socio-Religious perspectives. Cross-listed with Reli 214. 

Daly. J. 

215,F BLACKS IN THE AMERICAS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

A survey of the history of Blacks in the New World from 1619 to the present. Offered with 
additional work as Hist 315. Not offered 1992-93. 

Cox, E. 

217,F SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 18771917 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An examination of how social groups, as defined by such categories as gender, class, religion, 
ethnicity, and race, responded to the rapid and confusing changes brought about by industrial- 
ization, urbanization, and immigration in the years of America's rise to world power and 
industrial supremacy. Offered with additional work as Hist 317. Not offered in 1992-93. 

Stajf 

218,S SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1917-1960 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

A continuation of Hist 217, tracing the differential impacts of prosperity, depression, war, and 
economic change on the multifaceted American social structure. Offered with additional work 
as Hist 318. Not offered in 1992-93. 

Stajf 



358 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

230,S RETHINKING THE WESTERN TRADITION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The aims of this course are two-fold. On the one hand, it is intended to serve as an introduction 
to some of the central themes and controversies of the "Western Tradition." At the same time, 
it is meant to be a critical introduction, one that assumes the "truths of that tradition to be far 
from "self-evident." As such, the course will be organized and structured around a series of 
seminal debates and conflicts in the history of ideas: Nietzsche vs. Socrates, Romanticism vs. 
the Enlightenment, rationalism vs. relativism, liberalism vs. Marxism, and so forth. In keeping 
with its structure, the course will be strongly oriented toward discussion. Cross-listed with 
Humanities 230. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wolin.R. 

231,F AFRICA TO 1884 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This survey course covers: the changing historiography of Africa; the emergence of the Bantu; 
early Christianity and Islam; trans-Saharan trade; the medieval Sudanic Empires; Statelessness 
and State formation; Portugal in Africa; the slave trade; South Africa to 1867; the Mfecane; the 
Sudanic jihads; long distance trade; African-European relations in the 19th century. 

Odhiambo, A. 

232,S THE MAKING OF MODERN AFRICA (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This course surveys the transformation of Africa from the late 19th century to the present. The 
topics covered include: Europe and Africa in the 1 9th century; the scramble for and partition of 
Africa; the evolution of the colonial state; economic change in the 20th century: plantation and 
peasant agriculture, mining and industrialization, wage and migrant labor. African capitalism, 
rural differentiation, the roots of hunger and poverty; social change in the 20th century: the 
invention of ethnic identity, the emergence of elites, cultural policies — language, leisure, the 
changing roles of women, religion and cultural resistances, the rival conceptions of law and order, 
changes in medicine and healing, urbanization; political developments: ethnic unions, political 
parties, and decolonization; Africa since independence: the economic and political crises. 

Odhiambo, A. 

242,S SOUTHERN AUTOBIOGRAPHY (3-0 3) 

The autiobiography as a genre of historical documentation for U.S. southern history. The 
autiobiographies discussed will cover the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and represent most 
segments of the population. Not offered 1992-93. 

■ ' ' ~ Boles. J. 

244,S INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S HISTORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

What does it mean to study women's history? Is women's history the same thing as the history 
of women? This course examines both the range of approaches and the types of evidence used 
by scholars in the field. We will also discuss the relationship of women's history to several related 
fields, including feminist theory, gender studies, and the history of sexuality. Offered with 
additional work as Hist 344. Not offered 1992-93. 

250,S CHINESE CULTURE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An introduction to the language, philosophy, religion, art, literature, and social customs of China^' 
Offered with additional work as Hist 450. 

Smith, RJ. 

265,S CONTEMPORARY HISTORY (3 3) .^.^ .,-,p^P„, ,.r ,, 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 .^Kir^.i^. 

Our own years in historical perspective. The world since Nixon and Kissinger. Reading includes 
latest memoirs and biographies, leading newspapers and periodicals, also television and radio 
news. Not offered 1992-93. 

Loewenheim,F. 



359 

269,S U.S. LATIN AMERICAN RELATIONS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This course is a basic history of U.S. -Latin American Relations from 1775 to the present. 
Particular attention is given to twentieth century policies and problems focusing on intervention 
since 1945. Offered with additional work as Hist 469. 

Seed. P. 

273,F POST-BIBLICAL JEWISH HISTORY I (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Examination of the social, political, economic and theological contexts which shaped Jewish life 
under the rule of Romans. Christians and Muslims, and of developments in Jewish culture during 
this period in the areas of rabbinics. liturgy, poetry, philosophy and mysticism. Lecture and 
discussion of primary sources in translation. Offered with additional work as Hist 373. 

Fishman.T. 

274,S POST-BIBLICAL JEWISH HISTORY U (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Evolution and revolution in Jewish life under the impact of the Reformation. Sabbatean messianic 
movement. Hasidism. Enlightenment, Emancipation and nationalsim. Reform, positive-histori- 
cal (i.e.. Conservative ). Neo-Orthodox and Zionist re-definitions of Jewish identity. Lecture and 
discussion of primary source readings in translation. Offered with additional work as Hist. 374. 

Fishman, T. 

281,F HISTORY OF THE ISLAMIC NEAR EAST, 600 -1258 (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A survey of the basic political, institutional, and social history of the Near East from the rise of 
Islam to the Seljuks. We will pay particular attention to the elaboration of political and religious 
institutions (especially the caliphate), the origins and rise of Shii Islam, the growth and 
subsequent fragmentation of the caliphal empires, and the advent of the Turkic peoples, (lecture/ 
discussion) Offered with additional work as Hist 381. 

Sanders, P. 

282,S HISTORY OF THE ISLAMIC NEAR EAST, 1258 - 1805 (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Continues the first semester survey from the advent of the Seljuk Turks to the Ottoman conquest 
of Egypt. It includes discussion of the fate of the caliphate after the political fragmentation of the 
Abbasid empire, the rise of the mamluk military system, Mongols, Crusades, and the early 
history of the Ottoman and Safavid empires. Lecture/discussion. Hist 28 1 is recommended, but 
not required. Offered with additional work as Hist 382. 

Sanders, P. 



286,S THE REFORMATION AND ITS RESULTS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Theology and church-state issues from 16th-century Reformation to 17th century; medieval 
background; Luther. Calvin. Catholic Reformation; religious wars; Protestant Orthodoxy; 
Pietiest spirituality; Puritanism; calls for toleration. Also offered as Reli 286. 

St roup, J. 

293,F THE ART OF WAR FROM MACHIAVELLI TO NAPOLEON (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A study of the theory and practice of warfare from the classical age to the early nineteenth century. 
Reading includes selections from Thucydides. Caesar. Machiavelli. Saxe. and Napoleon. 
Lectures, discussions and examinations. Also offered with additional work as History 393. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Gruber. I. 



360 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

294,S WAR IN THE MODERN WORLD (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The theory, practice, and experience of war in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Reading 
includes selections from Clausewitz and Liddell Hart. Offered with additional work as History 
394. Not offered 1992-93. 

Gruher. I. 

297,F CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL HISTORY OF THE U.S. I (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Major questions in the historical development of American law and governing institutions. 
Offered with additional work as Hist 397. Not offered 1992-93. 

Hyman. H. 

298,S CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL HISTORY OF THE U.S. H (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Major questions in the historical development of American law and governing institutions. 
Offered with additional work as Hist 398. Not offered 1992-93. 

Hyman, H. 

299,S CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (3-0 3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An examination of the causes, events and results of America's most severe conflict. Special 
attention goes to connections between federalism, racial democracy and military-political events. 
Offered with additional work as Hist 399. 

Hyman, H. 

301,F EUROPE'S FIVE HUNDRED YEARS, 1450-1815 (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An enriched version of Hist 101. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 101 and 301. 
Recommended for Junior and Seniors. 
\ ■ \ ,.\\M. Stokes, G.. 

302,S EUROPE'S FIVE HUNDRED YEARS, 1815-PRESENT (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

An enriched version of Hist 102. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 102 and 302. 
Recommended for Juniors and Seniors. 

Stokes, G. 

303,F/S UNDERGRADUATE INDEPENDENT READING (3 3) 

Independent reading under the supervision of a faculty member. Open to a limited number of 
advanced students with special permission. 

Staff 

304,F/S UNDERGRADUATE INDEPENDENT READING (3 3) 

Independent reading under the supervision of a faculty member. Open to a limited number of 
advanced students with special permission. 

Staff 

305,S RUSSIAN HISTORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A survey of Russian history from earliest times to the present. Not offered 1992-93. 

Stokes. G. 

306,F POLITICS AND SOCIETY IN ANCIENT GREECE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.3 

Discussion of the main developments in social, political, and intellectual life in the Greek world 
from the end of the Mycenaean Age to the advent of Alexander the Great. Not offered 1992- 
93. 

Maas. M. 



361 

307,S THE ROMAN EMPIRE FROM AUGUSTUS TO JULIAN 
(31 BC-AD 363) (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Roman imperial history from the early empire to the eve of its fall in the west. Important themes 
include social change (Romanisation, Paganism, and Christianity) and political change (espe- 
cially development of the power of the emperor). 

Elton, H. 

308,S THE WORLD OF LATE ANTIQUITY (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A social, religious, and political history of the Roman world from Diocletian to the rise of Islam. 
Focus will be on the breaking of the unity of the Mediterranean world and the formation of 
Byzantine society in the Greek east. Not offered 1992-93. 

Maas, M. 

309,F DECLINE AND FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

What was the "fall" of the Roman Empire? This course examines the circumstances of the end 
of Roman political authority in western Europe. Ancient and modem theories will be considered, 
with special emphasis on the importance of the Germanic invasions. Not offered 1992-93. 

Maas, M. 

311,F AMERICAN THOUGHT & SOCIETY I (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Enriched version of Hist 211. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 21 1 and 311. 

Haskell, T. 

312,S AMERICAN THOUGHT & SOCIETY II (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An enriched version of Hist 212. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 212 and 312. 

Haskell, T. 

315,F BLACKS IN THE AMERICAS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An enriched version of Hist 215. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 2 1 5 and 315. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Cox, E. 

317,F SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1877-1917 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

An enriched version of Hist 2 1 7. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 2 1 7 and 317. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

318,S SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES, 1917-1960 (3 3) 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An enriched version of Hist 218. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 2 1 8 and 318. Not 

offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

319,S THE CITY, TECHNOLOGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This course will focus on the political, environmental and social impacts of technology on 
urban growth in the U.S. during the 1 9th and 20th centuries. We will devote particular attention 
to the city-building process, urban technology, public works and city services, and environmen- 
tal conditions. 

Melosi, M. 



362 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

320,F SCIENCE IN ANTIQUITY & MIDDLE AGES (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A survey of science from ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt and Greece to the end of the Middle 
Ages. No expertise in science required. 

Van Helden, A. 

321,S SCIENCE IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Between 1400 and 1700, Greek science, assimilated during the High Middle Ages, was 
radically transformed, not only in content but also in method and institutional setting. The 
thought of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and others will be examined in the 
context of the more general cultural history of this period. 

Van Helden, A. 

322,S PHYSICAL SCIENCE FROM NEWTON TO EINSTEIN (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A survey of the physical sciences from the establishment of the Newtonian world view, ca. 
1700, to its breakdown in the twentieth century. 

Van Helden, A. 

3234^ MODERN BALKAN HISTORY I (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

First of a two-semester sequence on the history of Southeastern Europe. This semester will cover 
the Ottoman period (15th- 19th centuries), and will discuss some of the following problems: 
Ottoman social and economic structure, the spread of Islam, the Ottoman impact on the society, 
politics, economics and culture of the Byzantine and medieval Balkan states, the Eastern question 
in European international relations. Not offered 1992-93. 

Stajf 

324,S MODERN BALKAN HISTORY II (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Second of a two-semester sequence on the history of Southeastern Europe, this course will cover 
the history of the independent Balkan states (Greece, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Romania, Albania, 
and Turkey) during the 19th and 20th centuries. The modernization or europeanization of the 
rural societies of the Balkans in the last two centuries is a major problem to be analyzed in its 
different aspects. Other topics will cover ethnic conflicts, the evolution of the national question, 
inter-Balkan relations, and the role of the great powers in the area. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

327,S COLONIAL LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The first part of a two semester survey course of colonial Latin America focusing on construction 
of the self and "other" narrative strategies and rhetoric. The colonial part examines narratives 
of conquest, travel, and piracy in Latin America and the Caribbean in the sixteenth and 
seventeenth centuries. 

Seed. P. 

328,S MODERN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This is the second part of a two semester course on Latin America focusing on construction of 
the self and "other" narrative strategies, and rhetoric in contemporary Latin America. The 
modem half examines nineteenth- and twentieth-century essays and novels dealing with modem 
Latin American identity. Readings include Sarmiento, Paz, and Naipaul. Not offered 1992-93. 

Seed, P. 



363 

329,F FIRST EUROPEAN EXPANSION, 1492-1640 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This course covers the histories of the first European expansion in the sixteenth century and the 
establishment of overseas colonial empires by France, Spain, Portugal, England, and the 
Netherlands. It focuses on the rationales for empires created by each of the concepts of 
"voluntary" subjection through commercial treaty and conversion, and those dealing with 
involuntary submission through conquest for "just war." 

Seed, P. 

334,S MARINERS, RENEGADES & CASTAWAYS: ATLANTIC DISSENT IN 
THE AGE OF EMPIRE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Popular life and resistance movements in the Atlantic World. 

Scott, J. 

335,F CARIBBEAN HISTORY TO 1838 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

History of the Caribbean from the arrival of Europeans to the abolition of slavery in the British 
West Indies in 1838. Focus will be on the social and economic history of the region during this 
period. Why did slavery and the plantation system emerge? Why did they fall? 

Cox, E. 

336,S CARIBBEAN HISTORY: 1838 TO THE PRESENT (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Social, economic, and political history of the people from the abolition of slavery to the emergence 
of independent nations in the modem era. Not offered 1992-93. 

Cox, E. 

337,S HISTORY OF ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL LAW (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

A history of ancient law focusing on imperial Roman law and the various forms of medieval law: 
vulgar Roman law. barbaric Germanic law, and English common law. 

Drew, K. 

338,F HUMANIST TRADITION & ITS CRITICS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

This course explores the development of the humanist tradition from its origins in the 
Renaissance to the present. We will focus first on the political, "civic" dimensions of 
humanism, concentrating on interpretations of Machiavelli's writings. Then we will study the 
implications of "literary" humanism for ideas about education, including our contemporary 
debates about university curricula and the role of the university in society. Students interested 
in this class should see the instructor prior to preregistration. 

Quillen, C. 

339,S MORALITY AND HISTORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Does it subvert the very idea of morality to say that it has a history, that it is susceptible to change? 
Students in this discussion and writing course will grapple with this problem through selected 
readings drawn mainly from Anglo-American history and philosophy that range over a period 
of several centuries. 

Haskell, T. 

340,F VICTORIAN INTELLECTUALS (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

The upheaval in late nineteenth century social thought and culture associated with Darwin's 
theory of evolution. Readings (mainly American, but including English and continental writers 
forcomparison) may include Spencer, Veblen, Henry Adams, William James, Dewey, Matthew 
Arnold and Nietzsche. 

Haskell. T. 



364 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

341,F HISTORY OF CHINA I (3-0 3) - ? *^''" 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Survey of Chinese history from antiquity to about 1800, highlighting salient aspects of China's 
heritage. Not offered 1992-93. 

Smith. R.J. 

342,F HISTORY OF CHINA H (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

China's revolutionary transformation in the nineteenth and twentieth centures — from Ch'ing 
dynasty to People's Republic. 

Smith. R.J. 

343,S CONTEMPORARY CHINA (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An examination of the interplay between "tradition" and "modernity" in contemporary China. 

■^,^-^: Smith. R.J. 

344,S INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S HISTORY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An enriched version of Hist 244. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 244 and 344. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Qui lien. C. 

345,S RENAISSANCE EUROPE: HUMANISM AND EUROPEAN 
EXPANSION (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A political, intellectual, and artistic survey of the decisive years in which the formation of Western 
Europe was completed. Not offered 1992-93. 

iVarJUAlL Quillen.C. 

346,S REFORMATION EUROPE (3-0-3) ^niauoolw^lt 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A survey of Western Europe in the sixteenth century, emphasizing the interplay between politics 
and religion in the rise and consolidation of Protestantism and the Catholic revival. Not offered 
1992-93. 

Qui 1 1 en, C. 

348,F THE UNITED STATES AND VIETNAM, 1945-1975 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This reading and discussion course will explore topics such as the reasons for thirty years of U.S. 
involvement in Southeast Asia, the dynamics of the military struggle in Vietnam, the impact of 
the war on American society and politics, and the place of the Vietnam War in postwar 
superpower diplomacy. 

Taylor, M. 

349,F AGE OF BISMARCK (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The history of Europe from the French Revolution and Napoleon to Bismarck, Gladstone. and the 
Spanish American War. Not offered 1992-93. '"^ *"'^" \'"" 

'' Loewenheim.F. 

350,S AMERICA IN THE 20TH CENTURY (3 3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Survey of major economic, social, and political developments in the United States from 1900 to 
1940. Lectures, readings, discussions and one research paper. Enrollment limited to forty 
students. 

' '■ ' > '■'- i ' Matusow. A. 



' " '^ ■ '' ■" 365 

352,F COMPARATIVE MODERNIZATION OFCHINA AND JAPAN(3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

A systematic comparison of the historical development ot China and Japan in the nineteenth and 
early twentieth centuries, giving attention not only to domestic issues and Sino-Japanese 
relations, but also to the larger international environment. Not offered 1992-93. 

Smith. R. 

353.S U.S. FOREIGN RELATIONS AND THE COLD WAR (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

An in-depth examination of America's role in world affairs since 1 945. focusing on the origins 
of the struggle between the free and communist worlds, the influence of nuclear weapons on 
superpower relations, the mteraction of foreign policy and American domestic politics, the 
contest for influence in the developing world, and the factors responsible for the Cold War's 
apparent demise. Lectures, discussions, and one research paper. 

Taylor. M. 

354,F 1941 - ANATOMY OF A WORLD HISTORICAL YEAR (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Would U.S. aid reach Britain in time'.' Would Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union remain at 
peace'? Would Japan and America face off in the Pacific'? A year of Tolstoyan propositions, 
centering around Roosevelt and Churchill. Hitler and Stalin. Lectures and discussions. Emphasis 
on contemporary evidence. Not offered 1992-93. 

Loewenheim.F. 

355,F MODERN GERMANY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

The German search for freedom and unity in international perspective. Special emphasis on the 
life and times of Frederick the Great. Otto von Bismarck. Adolf Hitler. Konrad Adenauer, the 
postwar division of the country and the events of 1989-1990. Not offered 1992-93. 

Loewenheim.F. 

356,8 THE HOLOCAUST IN INTERNATIONAL PERSPECTIVE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The Holocaust - Nazi Germany s systematic effort to exterminate the Jews - is unique in history. 
But its roots go far back in European history, and it could probably not have succeeded as it did 
without the long-standing indifference of Great Britain and the United States and the active or 
passive support of the Soviet Union. The course concerns the inner history of the Holocaust, with 
special emphasis on what contemporaries knew and when they knew it, and how the democracies 
responded during and after the war. including the war crimes trials. Not offered 1992-93. 

Loewenheim.F. 



359,F ROMAN BRITAIN AND MEDIEVAL ENGLAND (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Survey of historical developments in Roman Britain and Medieval England with special attention 
to social, economic, and religious factors. Not offered 1992-93. 

Drew. K. 

360,F GENDER & SEXUALITY - MODERN FRENCH HISTORY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II 3 

.\r\ examination of gender roles, gender ideology, and sexual practices in the construction of 
French society and culture from the Enlightenment to World War II. Topics to be examined 
include: sexual politics and the emergent notion of the "public sphere" in the 18th century; 
masculine and feminine images of the state during the Revolutionary period; feminist discourses 
and politics in 1789. 1848, and in the campaign for women's suffrage; family structures, 
patriarchy and notions of property. Readings will include novels and memoirs as well as 
historical works. Taught in English; some readings mav be done in French. Also offered as 
Fren 360. 

Sherman. D. 



366 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

361,F HISTORY OF ENGLAND: REFORMATION TO 1815 (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The personalities and forces that changed England from a backwater of Europe into the leading 
nation in the world. Lectures, discussions, and papers. 

Wiener, M. 

362,S HISTORY OF ENGLAND: FROM 1815 TO PRESENT (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

England ' s take-off into the Industrial Revolution and how it has adapted to the flourishing of the 
Empire. The twentieth century geopolitical and economic decline. Novels, biographies and other 
materials are used to examine the transformation of Britain in the past two centuries. Lectures, 
discussions and frequent short papers. 

Wiener, M. 

363,S GENDER AND SOCIETY IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE (3-0-3) 
♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

This course explores the relationship between ideas and gender and social, political, and legal 
institutions in Europe from about 1350-1800. Topics include: the structure and role of the 
family, gender roles in religious institutions, and the regulation of sexuality. 

QuillenX. 



365,F AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 1763-1789 (3-0-3) 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An investigation of the causes, process, and consequences of the American Revolution. Special 

emphasis will be placed on the reasons why colonial Americans rebelled, on the character of 

the War for American Independence, and on the constitutional settlement of 1787 and the 

securing of fundamental liberties. 

Martin, J. 

366,S WOMEN IN BRITAIN, 1500-1900(3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

From the time of Henry VIII to the reign of Victoria, women in Britain had a different experience 
than that of men. This course explores their lives through their homes, work, and public actions. 
Particularly, it focuses on the ambiguities of women's roles in English society: their mixed 
feelings about marriage and motherhood; the differing reactions of middle and working class 
women, and the pressures that pushed women into the formal workplace and the woman's 
movement. It offers a new perspective on the modern era of British history. Not offered 1992- 
93. 

Staff 

367,F HISTORY OF SOUTH AFRICA (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

This course will survey the history of South Africa from the mid- 1 7th Century. The topics to be 
covered include: South Africa before the Europeans; white settlers and Cape colonial society to 
1814; the capitalist revolution; the struggle for South Africa in the 19th century; the transforma- 
tion of South African society; the rise and development of the apartheid state; resistances and 
struggles. Not offered 1992-93. 

Odhiambo, A. 

368,S IMPERIALISM AND NATIONALISM IN AFRICA (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This course traces the origins, processes and critiques of Imperialism and Nationalism in Africa 
in the 20th century. Not offered 1992-93. 

Odhiambo, A. 



l\ ,r,nn\ .-jtV/ 



^ ' " ■■''•'■ '^ ■ . "' 367 

371 J^ FRANCE IN AN AGE OF REVOLUTION 1750-1870 (3-0-3) ^ • ^ 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Transformations in French society, culture, and politics before and after the revolution. Taught 
in English. Counts toward a History major. Cross-listed with French 371. 

Sherman. D. 

372,S SOCIETY AND POLITICS IN MODERN FRANCE, 18701988 (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

The emergence of modem France: the impact of war, industrialization, imperialism, and 
cultural mastery. Taught in English. Counts toward a History major. Cross-listed with French 

372. 

. - - Sherman. D. 

373,F POST-BIBLICAL JEWISH HISTORY I ( 3 3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

An enriched version of Hist 273. Students may not receive credit for both Hist. 273 and 373. 

Fishman, T. 

374,S POST-BIBLICAL JEWISH HISTORY II (3 3) ^ 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An enriched version of Hist 274. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 274 and 374. 

Fishman, T. 

376,S EXISTENTIALISM (3-0-3) 

An examination of the genesis and development of existentialism as an intellectual force in 
nineteenth- and twentieth-century Europe. Will begin with a brief treatment of Kierkegaard and 
Nietzsche, before proceeding to a study of twentieth-century figures such as Heidegger, Sartre, 
and Camus. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wolin.R. 

378,S CULTURAL CRITICISM AND AMERICAN SOCIETY ( 3 3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

This course will focus on the tension between ideals and reality in American life as expressed 
by a growing number of post-war social critics and theorists such as Marcuse, Lasch, Bellah, and 
Daniel Bell. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wolin, R. 

379,F INTRODUCTION TO POSTMODERNISM (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

We will begin with a survey of the most important intellectual precursors of postmodernism — 
Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Bataille — before moving on to consider the movement's leading 
representatives in contemporary France: Lyotard. Derrida. and Foucault. We will then conclude 
by examining some of the more important criticisms of the postmodern world view (e.g.. the 
critique of Jurgen Habermas). Not offered 1992-93. 

Wolin.R. 

381,F HISTORY OF THE ISLAMIC NEAR EAST, 600 - 1258 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 ' 
An enriched version of Hist 281. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 281 and 381. 

Sunders, P. 

382,S HISTORY OF THE ISLAMIC NEAR EAST, 1258 - 1805 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.3 

An enriched version of Hist 282. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 282 and 382. 

Sanders. P. 



368 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

383,F THE ENLIGHTENMENT (3-0 3) ' ^ ■ • '^^ ^ ' ^ - ^ 

A study of the transformation of the European intellect during the eighteenth century, with 
special emphasis on the Enlightenment as the intellectual harbinger of the French Revolution. 
Among the authors: Locke, Hume, Voltaire. Diderot, Rousseau, Kant, Not offered 1992-93. 

Wolin.R. 

385,F CHRISTIANS AND JEWS IN THE ISLAMIC WORLD (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE; CATEGORY II.3 

This course examines the history of Christian and Jewish communities in the Islamic world from 
the rise of Islam to the end of the Ottoman Empire. We will discuss the legal status of dhimmis 
(protected peoples), social and economic life, communal organization, interplay of Jewish and 
Muslim laws, and the constitution of political authority in these communities. The course will 
also include discussion of the modern historiography of these communities, comparative study 
of Jewish communities in Christendom and Islam, and discussion of Muslim communities living 
under Christian rule in the middle ages. Not offered 1992-93. 

i!/bni ^mouuic .c ;.i i^l^i lu m Sanders, P. 



ir,nn 10T liD- 



386,F INTRODUCTION TO ISLAM (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 f 

An introduction to Islam, emphasizing the historical development of classical Islamic religious 
thought, forms of Quranic exegesis, the development of Shi'i Doctrine, Islamic Law and 
theology, mysticism, and varieties of religious practice in different parts of the Islamic world. We 
will also discuss the imperialism, and the emergence of modem Islamist movements. The primary 
emphasis in the class will be on the ways in which Muslims have historically understood 
themselves and their own history. Not offered 1992-93 

Sanders, P. 

387,F EASTERN EUROPE IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This course focuses on the historical background and interpretation of the recent events in 
Eastern Europe. It introduces and analyzes the concepts of Central and Southeastern Europe, and 
studies their political, economic and cultural rationale, both in the period between the two world 
wars and during the cold-war era. Finally, it takes a close look at the events of 1989, "the fall 
that shook the world", in the specific context of each country involved. Not offered 1992-93. 
- -^- -• 5,^^ 

389,F EASTERN EUROPE TO 1945 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A lecture and discussion course covering the historical development of the countries of East 
Central Europe (Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary) and of Southeast Europe (Romania, 
Bulgaria, Albania, and Yugoslavia) through the end of World War II. 

Stokes, G. 

J 

390,S EASTERN EUROPE SINCE 1945 (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A discussion and writing seminar covering the development of Eastern Europe since 1 945, with 
special emphasis on the causes and results of the revolutions of 1989. Completion of Hist 389 

is desirable but not required. , 3^1303-, ion y^fim ?in3Dui«'. .18^ jziH lo n- ^ , ^ 

^ Stokes. G. 

391,F CAPITALISM AND CULTURE (3 3);- .v^ i^y ..^ i,WQ^^,.. -> r^r 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

What are the cultural consequences (ethical, aesthetic, and religious) of capitalism as a social 
formation? This question will be adressed through an examination of the work of several major 
social theorists, classical and contemporary. Among the authors treated will be Marx. Weber, 
Parsons, Habermas, and Bell. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wolin.R. 



' ;; - < 369 

392,S LIBERALISM, DEMOCRACY, AND COMMUNITY (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Contemporary American political thinkers such as Rawls, Sandel. and Walzer have attempted 
in provocative and contrasting ways to re-define the basic terms of modern political discourse. 
We will begin with a brief survey of the "classics" of modern political thought (Locke and Mill. 
Rousseau and Marx ) before proceeding to concentrate on the work of the above-named American 
theorists. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wolln.R. 

393,F THE ART OF WAR FROM MACHIAVELLI TO NAPOLEON (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

An enriched version of History 293. Students may not receive credit for both 293 and 393. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Gruber. I. 

394,S WAR IN THE MODERN WORLD ( 3 3 ) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

An enriched version of Historv 294. Students may not receive credit for both 294 and 394. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Gruher, I. 

395,F THE OLD SOUTH (303) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

A survey of the economic, cultural, political, religious, and social history of the South from 1 607 
to 1860 with particular attention to race. Not offered 1992-93. 

Boles. J. 

396,S THE NEW SOUTH (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 
Continuation of Hist 395 to the present. Not offered 1992-93. 

Boles. J. 

397,F CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL HISTORY OF U.S. I (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

.\x\ enriched version of Hist 297. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 297 and 397. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

■ 'i '.'■.' . _■;.-■ ■ ■■ ■ Hyman, H. 

398,S CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL HISTORY OF U.S. II (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

An enriched version of Hist 298. Students mav not receive credit for both Hist 298 and 398. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

ii. ,■ ■• . , ■ . .. ... . Hyman. H. 

399,F AMERICAN CIVIL WAR AND RECONSTRUCTION (3 3) - _, 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.3 

An enriched version of Hist 299. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 299 and 399. 

Hyman. H. 

402,S HONORS THESIS (3 3) 

Open to well-qualified students with special permission. Students must take both Hist 402 and 
4()3, or both 403 and 404. to aain credit. 

Staff 

403,F HONORS THESIS (3 3) 

Open to well-qualified students v\ ith special permission. Students must take both Hist 402 and 
Hist 403. or both 403 and 404 to eain credit. 

Staff 



370 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

404,S HONORS THESIS (3-0-3) ' .r ,.,.... :_ t: -. m, 

See Hist 402 and 403. 

Staff 

409,F HISTORY OF EAST AFRICA (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.3 

A survey of East African cultures, societies, economies and politics from the earliest times to the 
present: the peopling and languages of East Efrica; migrations and settlement , state formation; 
long-distance trade and expansions in scale; imperialisms and colonial conquest; colonial 
transformations of African societies; Nationalism, and Independence. 

Odhiambo, A. 

410,S KENYA IN MODERN HISTORY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This course will trace the path of the transformation of Kenya from tribal societies to a modern 
state. A background survey of the migrations, settlement and emergence of precolonial societies 
will be provided. The underlying cultural unities of the precolonial societies will be sketched, as 
well as the precapitalist socioeconomic formations. The course will then cover: Kenya in the 1 9th 
century; the British conquest of Kenya; the colonial state and its contradictions; the colonial 
economy; educational and religious changes; social and cultural changes; the traditions of 
resistance and collaboration; the invention of tribes; clan, district and territorial politics; Mau 
Mau. decolonization and constitutional changes; the post colonial state; Kenyan societies 
towards the end of the 20th century. 

Odhiambo, A. 

413,S SLAVERY IN NORTH AMERICA (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An enriched version of Hist 213. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 2 1 3 and 413. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Boles, J. 

421,F TOPICS IN CHINESE HISTORY DIVINATION IN CHINESE 
HISTORY (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This seminar will explore the role of divination in the political and social life of China from 
neolithic times to modem era. focusing on fortune-telling as a reflection of traditional Chinese 
attitudes, values, world view, and cosmology. Prerequisite: any course in Chinese history or the 
consent of the instructor; limited to 15 students. Not offered 1992-93. 

Smith, R.J. 

423,F WOMEN IN EARLY MODERN EUROPE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

The course develops a critical feminist perspective on the historical issues of the early modern 
era. Topics covered include: the coming of capitalism, the Reformation, the expansion of literacy . 
the demographic transition, and the development of seventeenth-century science. Not offered 
1992-93. 

Seed, P. 

424,S AMERICAN EMANCIPATION IN COMPARATIVE PERSPECTIVE 

(3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A discussion-seminar course examining the comparative history of Emancipation in the New 
World. 

Scott, J. 



libaij ntjsy oi Wl^ bni, SU*> rUor' 



371 

425,F COLONIAL/POST COLONIAL DISCOURSE (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

The course will cover one of the most important emerging theoretical issues in the study of the 
Third World peoples, namely how Europeans and Americans have created definitions of who 
these people are, and how they behave, by virtue of not their systems of knowledge but ours. The 
constitution of colonized peoples as subjects of knowledge by their colonizers is known as 
colonial discourse; the reactions of the colonized, post-colonial discourse. The first half of the 
course will analyze the theories of colonial and post-colonial discourse, the second half will deal 
with examples from Latin America, Africa, and South Asia. Prerequisite: EITHER one Third 
World history course (any area) OR a course in literary or anthropological theory. 

Seed, P. 

426,F COMPARATIVE SLAVERY AND RACE RELATIONS IN THE 
AMERICAS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A comparative analysis of slavery and race relations in the U.S., the Caribbean, and Latin 
America, chiefly to the late nineteenth century. It addresses issues like the relative harshness or 
mildness of the institution of slavery in various systems, opportunities for advancement for the 
former slaves, and the resultant nature of race relations. Not offered 1992-93. 

Cox, E. 

427,S HISTORY OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT 1954-1984 (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An examination of the modem Civil Rights movement, focusing on the goals and strategies of 
the major spokespersons and leaders, as well as the achievements of the campaign. To what 
extent was there success? To what extent was there failure? Is there an "unfinished" agenda that 
needs to be completed? Not offered 1992-93. 

Cox, E. 

430,S SOCIAL PROBLEMS AND POLICY IN NINETEENTH CENTURY 
BRITAIN (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.3 

This course wil focus on sexual relations and the family as sites of social problems. The discovery 
and construction of problems such as prostitution, illegitimacy, child abuse, abortion and divorce 
will be explored. Discussion and a research paper. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wiener, M. 

431,F VICTORIAN MORALITY (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The rise and decline of a set of attitudes and values about human nature and behavior that 
flourished widely in the nineteenth century. Social sources and functions of this morality will be 
stressed, in particular its role in structuring class, gender and generational relations in an age of 
rapid change. Britain will be the geographical focus, with glances at the United States and 
Western Europe. Material examined will include literature and art. Lectures, discussions and a 
research paper. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wiener, M. 

436,S WARFARE IN THE ROMAN EMPIRE (31 BC-AD 476) (3-0 3) 

^DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This course discusses the military practices of the Roman empire and its enemies until the fall 
of the empire. Core themes are the military effectiveness of the Roman army and its 
adaptability to face regional problems. Other issues examined include leadership, communi- 
cation, civil wars and naval operations. 

Elton, H. 



372 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

437,F LIFE ON THE NILE: EGYPTIAN POLITICS, CLLTLRE AND 
SOCIETY FROM MEDIEVAL TO MODERN TIMES (3 3) 

An examination ot Egyptian history from the Arab conquest in 641 until the 20th century, 
focusing on major themes m Egypt's political, social, and cultural life, on historical continuities 
and discontinuities, and on problems of historical interpretation. Lecture/discussion. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Sanders . P. 

438,S GENDER AND SOCIETY IN ISLAM (3-0-3) 

This course will examine some features of the legal position and social realities of men and 
women in the Islamic world. We w ill discuss the family and sexual ethics, the harem, polygyny, 
divorce, and eunuchs ( w ho played an important role in both the military and in certain religious 
institutions) in order to understand how the boundaries of gender have traditionally been drawn. 
Not offered 1992-93. 

.",7'T^'^ Sanders. P. 



439,F CHRISTIANITY & THE WEST: FROM THE BARBARIANS TO 
BEOWULF (3-0-3) 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.3 

This course begins with the invasion of the Roman Empire by pagan Barbarians and ends with 
a Christian's meditations upon his people's pagan past. In between, we will study the 
Christianization of England. France, and Ireland, the relationship between saints and sinners, 
and the creation of an expansionist European Christianity. 

Nirenherii. D 

440,S SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC HISTORY OF EUROPE IN THE MIDDLE 
AGES (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Seminar covering selected problems in the social and economic history of rnedieval Europe. 

Drew. K. 

442,S HISTORY OF ASTRONOMY AND COSMOLOGY ( 3 3 ) 

A lecture and discussion course dealing with topics in the history of astronomy and cosmology 
from antiquity to the twentieth century. Not offered 1992-93. 

V an Helden . A . 

445,F RELIGIOUS RADICALISM AND ITS PERSECUTION IN THE AGE 
OF THE REFORMATION (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This seminar examines instances of religious radicalism and its persecution in order to explore 
the relationship between religious and political authority in Europe from 1400-1700. Topics of 
study include: Christian treatment of the Jews, the Anabaptist Movement. Quakerism, the 
Inquisition, the German Peasants' War. and the "witch craze." Enrollment is limited. Prerequi- 
site: permission of instructor. Not offered 1992-93. 

Quillen. C. 

447,F PERCEPTION OF THE JEWS: TACITUS TO MARX (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 11.3 

In their quest for a life of greater spiritual intensity. Jews throughout the ages have sought means 
of enhancing and supplementing ritual observance. Course explores pietistic attitudes and 
practices, meditational techniques, theosophical speculation and strategies foreffecting redemp- 
tion, both personal and collective. Readings in translation include selections from ethical wills, 
manuals for self-improvement, philosophical and m\ St ical treatises composed from the rabbinic 
period through modern times. Instructor's permission required. 

Fishman. T. 



^ ' • • - 373 

448,S JEWISH PHILOSOPHY &MYSTICISMf 3-0-3) . 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Exploration of social and cultural developments in West European life and thought resulting from 
the dominant society "s interaction with Jews and Judaism. Readingi> include selections from the 
Pauline Epistles. Eusebius, Pico della Mirandola. Reuchlin. Luther. Spinoza. Rabelais. 
Grimmelshausen. Voltaire. Hegel. Herder. Marx and Freud. Frequent short papers and student 
presentations. Instructor's permission required. 

Fishman. T. 

450,S CHINESE CULTURE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An enriched version of Hist 250. Students mav not receive credit for both Hist 250 and 450. 

Smith. RJ. 

451,F PHILOSOPHIES & THEOLOGIES OF HISTORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Modem thought on the meaning an dultimate direction of histop. . roots in eschatology. 
Augustine, flowering in progress and historicism--e.g. Vico. Lessing. Hegel. Ranke. Burckhardt. 
Nietzsche. Hamack, Troeltsch, Meinecke. Spengler, Heidegger. Butterfield, Dawson, 
Schweitzer. Jaspers. Toynbee. Also offered as Reli 451. 

Stroup.J. 

452,F ART, POLITICS, AND SOCIETY IN 19TH CENTURY FRANCE (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

This seminar will cover such topics as: Realism. Impressionism, and "official" and institutional 
culture. Cross-listed with French 452. Not offered 1992-93. 

Sherman. D. 

453,F FRENCH REVOLUTION IMAGINED: 19TH CENTURY & AFTER (3- 

0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Historiography, fiction, literature with some attention to painting and popular illustration. 
Taught in English; students may do readings in English or French. Also offered as Fren 453. 

Sherman. D. 

454,S REPORTING FROM THE UNFREE WORLD (3-0-3) 
How Western journalists have viewed authoritarian and totalitarian regimes in the twentieth 
century, from the Russian Revolutions of 1 9 1 7 to the present, the background and impact of their 
accounts on public opinion and offical policy. Not offered 1992-93. 

Loewenheim,F. 

455,F FROM BISMARCK TO THE FIRST WORLD WAR (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

The revolutions of 1 848. the unification of Italy and Germany, Bismarck and Gladstone, the new- 
nationalism and imperialism, the political and cultural upheavals of the turn of the century, and 
the road to war. Not offered 1992-93. 

Loewenheim, F . 

456,F FROM SARAJEVO TO DANZIG: DECLINE OF THE EUROPEAN 
WORLD (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Europe from 1 9 1 4 to 1 939: the First World War and its consequences, with special attention to 
the historic role of the United States in world affairs. Not offered 1992-93. 

Loewenheim. F . 



374 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

457,S FROM DANZIG TO SUEZ: THE END OF THE EUROPEAN WORLD, 
1939 - 1956 (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Europe from 1 939 to 1 956: the Second World War and its consequences, with special attention 

to the role of the United States in world affairs. Not offered 1992-93. 

fj^i .i-. 1. cfrii. ■ :...,,:,.) ,,.jn .v/uan .. Loewenheim. F . 

458,S EUROPE AND WORLD POLITICS FROM SUEZ TO THE PRESENT 

(3-0-3) 
The world in 1956, the Cold War, the era of Vietnam, and after, with special attention to role 
of the United States in world affairs. Not offered 1992-93. 

Loewenheim, F. 

459,F THE MUNICH CRISIS (3 3) 

The historical origins, inner history, and significance of a world historical crisis, with special 
emphasis on contemporary records and the role of the United States. Not offered 1992-93. 

Loewenheim, F. 

460,S ADVANCED SEMINAR IN ANCIENT HISTORY (3-0 3) 

Limited enrollment. Prerequisites: History 307, 308, or 309, or consent of the instructor. Not 

offered 1992-93. 

Maas, M. 

462,S THE LIFE AND TIMES OF ADOLPH HITLER (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

How and why Hitler and National Socialism took over Germany, conquered most of Europe, and 
finally met defeat and destruction. Not offered 1992-93. 

i »/■! '/r/iirTi T/v Loewenheim, F. 

465,F COLONIAL AMERICA TO 1754 (3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

The growth of society, thought, and politics in the English colonies of North America. Lectures, 
discussions, and papers. Not offered 1992-93. 

Gruher, /. 

466,S AMERICAN REVOLUTION, 1754-1789 (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 •^' ■'■'''" 

The origins and implications of the American Revolution, emphasizing constitutional, social, and 
political developments. Not offered 1992-93. 

Gruber. /. 

469,S U.S.-LATIN AMERICAN RELATIONS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Enriched version of Hist 269. Students may not receive credit for both Hist 269 and Hist 469. 

Seed. P. 

470,S EUROPEAN FAMILY HISTORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

This is an introductory course to family history as a discipline, and to the history of the modern 
European family. Topics will include some of the following: kinship and the patterns, reproduc- 
tion and sexuality, the family life course, interaction of the family and other social institutions, 
social discussion of major writings on these topics, based mostly on the West European 
experience. Not offered 1992-93. 

Stajf 



375 

471,S POLITICAL TEXTS: HISTORICAL & LITERARY APPROACHES 

(3-0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

Through readings that will include novels, memoirs, speeches, and biographical writing, 
chiefly from the Third Republic, this course will examine the ways in which history and 
narrative theory illume and inform our understanding of political texts. Also offered as Fren 
471. Not offered 1992-93. 

Sherman, D.: Harter. D. 

474,F TOPICS IN EUROPEAN SOCIAL HISTORY, 1500-1950 (3 0-3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II. 3 

An exploration of the dramatic changes in the lives of ordinary (and not-so-ordinary) Europeans 
from the early-modem period, through the upheaveals of industrialization, to our own turbulent 
century. Among the areas of society in which change will be examined: women's lives, the family, 
sexuality, popular culture, childhood, schooling, and work. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

475,S RADICAL THOUGHT (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A survey of the theories of some of the most important thinkers in the Marxist and Neo-Marxist 
tradition. Although we begin with an introductory treatment of Marx, we will focus primarily on 
the Hegelian Marxism of Georg Lukcas and the "critical theory" of the Frankfurt School: Max 
Horkheimer, Theodor Adomo, Walter Benjamin, and Herbert Marcuse. Among the themes we 
will be emphasizing will be: the critique of "instrumental reason," the Neo-Marxist theory of 
culture, and the attempt at a Freud-Marx synthesis. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wolin, R. 

476,S TRADITION, IDENTITY AND HISTORICAL WRITING (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

Individuals and societies define themselves partly by establishing a relationship with the past. 
How does this happen? And what role do historical writing and interpretation play in this 
process? This course explores the intersection of cultural tradition, collective identity, and 
historical writing in the modem West. Topics include: the uses made of the classical past in 
movements from Renaissance humanism to contemporary Afrocentrism; the development of 
nationalist traditions; and the creation of European identities through juxtapositions with other 
cultures. Enrollment limited. Cross-listed with Fren 476. 

Quillen, C, Sherman, D. 

480,S PRISONS IN AMERICAN CULTURE (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A historical investigation of the changing cultural significance of imprisonment, from the early 
Quaker reforms to the uprisings of the contemporary period. The emphasis is not on criminology 
or ethics but on what prisons have meant, how and why they have been viewed or kept from sight, 
in American literary expression, politics, and society. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

492,F MICHEL FOUCAULT (3-0 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A seminar devoted to a critical reading of Foucoult's work from "Madness and Civilization" to 
"The History of Sexuality." Not offered 1992-93. 

Wolin. R. 

494,S PROBLEMS IN NINETEENTH- AND TWENTIETH-CENTURY 
EUROPEAN HISTORY (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

A discussion and pro-seminar on various problems of nineteenth and twentieth century European 
history. Different topics are covered in different years. Enrollment limited to 15 students. Not 
offered 1992-93. 

Stokes, C. 



376 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

501,F MASTER'S HISTORICAL RESEARCH (Variable) 

Master's thesis. Students must take both Hist 501 and 502 in order to gain credit. 



502,S MASTER'S HISTORICAL RESEARCH (Variable) 

See Hist Jul. •» .-../wi >JJ.ri'IIV>V| IV^ ^II>UI>U'C.WVISM -^-j iii<u>iii w.^ 



503,F GRADUATE TOPICS (Variable) 
504,S GRADUATE TOPICS (Variable) 



511,F DIRECTED READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY I (4-0-4) 
For graduate students only. ^ 



512,S DIRECTED READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY I (4-0-4) 

For graduate students only. 



513,F DIRECTED READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY II (4-0-4) 
For graduate students only. 



514,S DIRECTED READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY II (4-0-4) 
For graduate students only. 



Staff 

Staff 
Staff 
Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Staff 

Staff 



517,F DIRECTED READINGS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (4 0-4) 
For graduate students only. 

Staff 

518,S DIRECTED READINGS IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (4-0-4) 
For graduate students only. 

Staff 

521,F DIRECTED READINGS IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY (4-0-4) 
For graduate students only. 

Staff 

522,S DIRECTED READINGS IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY (4 4) 

For graduate students only. 

Staff 

525,F DIRECTED READINGS IN AFRICAN HISTORY (4-0-4) 
For graduate students only. 

Odhiambo. A. 



526,S DIRECTED READINGS IN AFRICAN HISTORY (4-0-4) 
For graduate students only. 



Odhiambo, A. 



527,F DIRECTED READINGS IN NON-WESTERN HISTORY (4 4) 

For graduate students only. ■ FP-cpp' 

Staff 



-^ " 377 

528,S DIRECTED READINGS IN NON- WESTERN HISTORY (4 4) 

For graduate students only. 

Staff 

529,F DIRECTED READINGS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY I (4-0 

4) 
For graduate students only. 

Staff 

530,S DIRECTED READINGS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY 1(4 0-4) 
For graduate students only. 

Staff 

531,F DIRECTED READINGS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY U (40^) 
For graduate students only. 

Staff 

532,S DIRECTED READINGS IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY II (404) 
For graduate students only. 

Staff 

533,F GRADUATE COLLOQUIUM IN EUROPEAN HISTORY (4 4) 

For graduate students only. Not offered 1992-93. 

Staff 

535,F GRADUATE COLLOQUIUM IN AMERICAN HISTORY (4 4) 

For graduate students only. 

Boles. J. 

540,F REVISIONISM IN AFRICAN HISTORY (4-0 4) 

The course is concerned with the impact of theoretical constructs and debates on African 
historiography. It takes note of the intellectual debates that have been organized around 
modernization, underdevelopment, dependency, world-systems and the Marxist/Neo-Marxist 
theories. These postulations, originally derived from historical studies in Europe, Asia, and Latin 
America, have simultaneously opened up African history to a wider comparative discourse while 
at the same time imposing hegemony on the nature of that discourse. This course is concerned 
in part with the histories of these theories. In the second part it will discuss the histories of certain 
specific concepts, including feudalism. Oriental despotism, modes of production, capitalism, 
social classes, nationalism, race, ethnicity, peasantries, class consciousness, the state — in their 
home contexts — and the ways they have been applied to the study of African history. Thirdly, 
the course will discuss in what ways these theories and concepts have influenced the evolution 
of specific historiographies in Africa: •"Africanist." ■"nationalist" and "radical." Not offered 
1992-93. 

Odhiambo, A. 

550,F MAIN ISSUES IN CARIBBEAN HISTORY (4 4) 

This course will focus on some of the major local and international forces and ideas which have 
shaped the course of the history of the Caribbean. 

Cox. E. 

552,F GRADUATE SEMINAR IN HISTORICAL INTERPRETATION (4^)^) 
For graduate students only. Not offered 1992-93. 

Haskell. T. 

570,S THEORY AND PRACTICE IN FRENCH CULTURAL HISTORY (4 0^) 

Graduate seminar. Cross-listed with French 570. Not offered 1992-93. 

Sherman. D. 



378 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

571,S POLITICAL TEXTS: HISTORICAL LITERARY APPROACHES (4-0-4) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY II.3 

An enhanced version of Hist 47 1 for graduate credit. Cross-listed with Fren 57 1 . Not offered 

1992-93. 

'OfiPW.'AA Sherman, D.; Harter, D. 

581,S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY (4 0-4) 
Offered when demand justifies. For graduate students only. 

Drew,K. 

582,S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN MODERN BRITISH HISTORY (4 0-4) 
For graduate students only. Not offered 1992-93. 

Wiener. M. 

583,F GRADUATE SEMINAR IN SOUTHERN HISTORY (4-0-4) 
Religion and slavery in the Old South. Not offered in 1992-93. 

Boles, J. 

584,S GRADUATE SEMINAR IN SOUTHERN HISTORY (4-0-4) 
Religion and slavery in the Old South. 

Boles, J. 

585,F U.S. CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL HISTORY (4-0-4) 
Significant constitutional and legal questions stressing civil liberties, criminal law. civil- 
military relations, race relations, and urban problems. 

Hyman. H. 

586,S U.S. CONSTITUTIONAL AND LEGAL HISTORY (4 0-4) 
Significant constitutional and legal questions stressing civil liberties, criminal law, civil- 
military relations, race relations, and urban problems. 

Hyman, H. 



591,F/S GRADUATE READING (1-01) 
Graduate reading in conjunction with another course. 



592,F/S GRADUATE READING (10-1) 
See Hist 591. 



593,F/S GRADUATE READING (10-1) 
See Hist 591. 



800,F PH.D. RESEARCH (Variable) 
Doctoral dissertation. 



800,S PH.D. RESEARCH (Variable) 
Doctoral dissertation. 



Staff 



Staff 





A fli .'"i 


Staff 


<« 


/ '; "! ?"!■ ??:^! Y\ 





Staff 



Staff 






'Vr . ■ ■',.• • ■ : 379 

Human Performance and Health Sciences 



Professor Poindexter, C//a//- .,,.. 

Professors Bearden, lammarino, Lee, and Spence 

Adjunct Professors Bryan, Butler, Fred, Risser, Skaggs, and Weinberg 

Associate Professors Disch and Etnyre 

Assistant Professors Long and Thomas 

Instructor Phenix 

Lecturers Bordelon, Edge, Eggert, Lidvall, Lindley, Miller, Peters, Pyung-Soo, and 

Vandenberg 

Degrees Offered: B.A. with major in Human Performance; health education as 
teaching field only. 

A minimum of 120 semester hours is required for the Bachelor of Arts with a 
major in Human Performance. The University distribution requirements described on 
pages 68-90 must be satisfied. Students majoring in Human Performance must 
complete 38 semester hours of physical education courses and laboratories in accor- 
dance with one of the specified Human Performance tracks. Human Performance 105, 
120, and 250, and six activity laboratories are required in all tracks. For additional 
information about the tracks, consult with a departmental faculty adviser. 

Both physical education and health education are offered as fields for teacher 
certification. Students wishing to qualify for teacher certification by the Texas 
Education Agency must complete 12 semester hours of English, 6 semester hours of 
American history, 6 semester hours of federal and state government, 1 8 semester hours 
of education. 24 semester hours in another teaching field, and 24 semester hours of 
health education courses or physical education courses, according to which is selected 
for the teaching field. Requirements are subject to change based on Texas Education 
Agency regulations. 

Health education courses cannot be used to fulfill the requirements for a major in 
physical education but may be taken as electives by all students. 



Human Peiformance Courses 

101,F/S BASIC PHYSICAL EDUCATION (0 2 0) 

Skill development, knowledge of rules and strategy, concepts of conditioning, and participation 
in two physical activities. Required for baccalaureate degree. Normally, it is expected that the 
requirement for Phed 1 1 - 1 02 be completed during the freshman year. Prerequisite: Health Data 
Form must be submitted to the Health Service prior to class registration. 

Spence, D. 

102,F/S BASIC PHYSICAL EDUCATION (0 2 0) 

Skill development, knowledge of rules and strategy, concepts of conditioning, and participation 
in two physical activities. Required for baccalaureate degree. 

Spence, D. 



380 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

105,F CONTEMPORARY SPORT (3-0-3) 

Interactions of history, philosophy, economics, politics, education, and contemporary social 

issues in the evolution of sport. For first- and second-year students. 

Poindexter. H. 

120,S SCIENTIFIC FOUNDATIONS (3 3) 

An introduction to the scientific areas of human movement: anatomy and physiology, physiology 
of exercise, motor learning, and kinesiology. 

Thomas. D. 

122,F BASIC AQUATICS (0 3 1) 

Instruction in basic aquatic activities, including mechanics of the various strokes and basic 
lifesaving. 

Bearden, F. 

124,S CONDITIONING (0-3-1) 

Concepts and experience in health-related fitness and conditioning for improved performance. 
Prerequisite: concurrent or previous enrollment in Phed 120 or previous enrollment in Phed 101 
and 102. 

Long, K. 

125,F/S LIFEGUARD TRAINING (0 3 1) 

Aquatic instruction leading to Lifeguard Training Certificate. 

Bearden, F. 

126,S WATER SAFETY (0 3 1) 

Focus on skills, theory, teaching progressions, and practice teaching of swimming, lifesaving, 
and beginning swimming. Completion of requirements leads to certification as Water Safety 
Instructor. Prerequisite: currently valid Lifeguard Training Certificate. 

Vandenberg, K. 

128,F/S RACQUET SPORTS (0-3-1) 

Skill development, knowledge of rules and strategy, concepts of conditioning, and participation 
in badminton, racquetball, and squash. Prerequisite: concurrent or previous enrollment in Phed 
105 or 120 or previous enrollment in Phed 101 and 102. 

Staff 

204,S PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS (3 0-3) 

Investigation of the theoretical and empirical psychological foundations of sport and physical 

activity. 

y.iv.-\«<;j Poindexter, H. 

205,F SPORT AND SOCIETY (3-0-3) 

A study of the development of contemporary sport and its interrelationships with existing social 

institutions. 

Lee, E. 

223,S INDIVIDUAL SPORTS (0 3 1) 

Skill development, knowledge of rules strategy, concepts of conditioning, and participation in 
fencing, golf, and archery. Prerequisite: concurrent or previous enrollment in Phed 105 or 
previous enrollment in Phed 101 and 102. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. 

Bearden, F. 

228,F TENNIS (0-3-1) 

Skill development, knowledge of rules and strategy, concepts of conditioning, and participation 
in tennis. Prerequisite: Concurrent or previous enrollment in Phed 105 or previous enrollment 
in Phed 101 and 102. 

Etnyre, B. 



/ ;l:0-^^r>>^i'iO '^:!':..'- '■ 381 

250,S ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY (3-0-3) <> ■■ '^ ^ " 
Introduction to human anatomy and physiology, with emphasis on gross structure and basic 
concepts of function. 

Spence, D. 

260,F INTRODUCTION TO SPORTS MANAGEMENT (3 0-3) 
Management theory and practice related to the administration of sports organizations. 

Staff 

300,F/S SPORTS MANAGEMENT INTERNSHIP (Credit variable) 

Internship experience for senior students in sports management track. Prerequisite; permission 

of instructor. 

■ :>.; /<:: - " Staff 

302,S KINESIOLOGY (3-0 3) 

Anatomical and mechanical bases of human movement with emphasis on the analysis of sport 
and exercise skills. Prerequisite: Phed 120, 250, or permission of instructor. 

Thomas. D. 

304,S FIRST AID/EMERGENCY CARE/CPR (2-1-2) 

The American Red Cross certification program for emergency care procedures for illness, 
traumatic injuries, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Limited enrollment: 25. Also offered as 
Heal 308. 

Vandenberg. K. 

305,F EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN (3-0-3) 

Areas of exceptionality displayed by children within the school or institution relative to the 

physical educator's role. 

Bearden, F. 

308,S PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (3-0-3) 
Teaching methodology, program development, and implementation of teaching techniques and 
class management. For junior and senior students. 

Lee, E. 

311,F MOTOR LEARNING (3-0-3) 

Physiological, neurological, and psychological factors affecting voluntary skill acquisition and 
development. 

Poindexter, H., Etnyre, B. 

314,F/S METHODS PRACTICUM (0-3-1) 

Practicum in the application of teaching methods in physical education activities. Prerequisite: 

concurrent or previous enrollment in Phed 308. 

Lee, E. 

3194=^ TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS (3 3) 

Introduction to basic statistics, test construction and evaluation, and elementary measurement 
theory in physical education. 

Disch,J. 

321,F PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE (3 3) 

Physiologic response of the circulatory, respiratory, and muscular systems to exercise stress. 
Prerequisite: Phed 1 20 or permission of instructor. 

Long, K. , Thomas, D. 



382 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

323,F PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE (0-3- 1 ) ^^"« f!'' ' ^f^T * 

Measuring physiologic response to exercise stress. Prerequisite: concurrent enrollment in Phed 

321. 

vi ,^ Long, K., Thomas, D. 

326,F TRAINING ROOM PROCEDURES (0-3-1 ) 

Field application in prevention, management, and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. Limited 

enrollment: 24. For Junior and Senior students. 

Eggert, A. 

334,S TEAM SPORTS (0-3- 1 ) 

Selected team sports including volleyball and soccer. Prerequisite: Phed 124 and two of: Phed 

122,126,128,135,223,228, and 337. 

Disch, J. 

/p.n.rr/rvojoig'^v 

337,F BASIC MOVEMENT — DANCE (0-3-1) 

An introduction to modem dance techniques and improvisation. 

Phenix, L. 

338,S DANCE TECHNIQUE & IMPROVISATION (0-3-1) ' ' 

Modem dance techniques and improvisation. 

.: Lj-._._j^a£.cdL Phenix, L. 

^ ■■.. '. r- .I.-'' . 

350,F/S COACHING INTERNSHIP (Credit variable) 

Internship experience for senior students in coaching track. Prerequisite: permission of instructor 

prior to the semester in which the intemship will be taken. 

Disch, J. 



362,S SPORTS MARKETING AND PROMOTION (3-0 3) 

An examination of marketing and promotion strategies in sport. For junior and senior students 

only. 

Lee, EJ. 

375,F/S SPORTS SCIENCE INTERNSHIP (Credit variable) 

Internship experience for senior students in sports medicine and sports S(^erice trkfck^. Prereq- 
uisite: permission of instructor. 

Spence, D. 
m esiipiricji p.^y r.oiogicai lounaanons oi spo 

412,F MOTOR CONTROL 

Exploration of neurophysiological, behavioral, and biomechanical aspects of motor control. 

Etnyre, B. 

431,S COACHING OF BASKETBALL (2 2) 

Study of coaching methods and strategies for developing high level athletic performance. 

- . — Disch, J. 

:M V/noO 1891 ,f 

432,S COACHING OF BASEBALL (2-0 2) 

Disch, J. 

433,F COACHING OF FOOTBALL (2 0-2) 

— Etnyre. B. 

^iJinaqioOSl b3f1*I 

434,S COACHING— TRACK AND FIELD (2-0 2) 

Spence, D. 



383 

436 Ji^ COACHING OF VOLLEYBALL (2-0-2) * 

. ■ •----: Disch,J. 

464,S SPORT AND THE LAW (3 3) 

Legal aspects of sport and recreation. For junior and senior students only. 

490,S SEMINAR IN SPORTS MEDICINE 

Case study approach is used to present sports related injuries, management, and rehabilitation. 
Prerequisite: Hper 34 1 . 

- _ - _ Spence, D. 



495,F INDEPENDENT STUDY (Credit variable) 
For junior and senior students only. 



496,S INDEPENDENT STUDY (Credit variable) 
See Phed 495. 



498Ji'/S SPECIAL TOPICS (Credit variable) 



Lee, E. 

Lee, E. 
Poindexter, H. 



Health Courses 

1034^ NUTRITION (3 0-3) 

Concepts underlying the science of nutrition: food composition, calories and needs for energy, 

special nutrients, and nutritional deficiencies. 

Long, K. 

107,F CONCEPTS IN HEALTH SCIENCE (3-0-3) 

Designed to acquaint prospective health educators with the structure and function of health in 

our society. 

Edge, V. 

201,F INTRO-ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS (3 3) 

* DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY III.5 The chemical, physical, and biological compo- 
nents of the environment as natural resources and the effect of pollution on their maintenance 
and utilization. Also offered as Envi 201. 

Ward, C. 

208,S CHEMICAL ALTERATIONS OF BEHAVIOR (3-0 3) 
Investigates the use, abuse, and misuse of alcohol, tobacco, and psychoactive drugs. 

Miller, M. 

306,S HUMAN SEXUALITY (3-0-3) 

Designed to explore the physiological, psychological, and sociological parameters of human 
sexuality, to provide accurate sex information, and to develop healthy attitudes toward sexuality. 

lammarino, N. 

308,S FIRST AID/EMERGENCY CARE/CPR (3 3) 

American Red Cross certification program for emergency care procedures for illness, traumatic 
injuries, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Enrollment limited to 25. Also offered as Phed 304. 

Vandenberg. K. 



384 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

407,F DISEASES OF THE HUMAN ORGANISM (3-0-3) /nnn-iA 

Study of communicable, noncommunicable, and behavioral diseases with emphasis on the 

disease process and basic epidemiologic methods. 

lammarino, N. 

410,S PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT IN HEALTH EDUC (3-0-3) 
Content and methods in teaching health education; program materials and curriculum construc- 
tion in secondary school health education programs. Required for Teaching Certification in 
Health. 

Staff 

495,F INDEPENDENT STUDIES (Credit variable) 

lammarino, N. 

496,S INDEPENDENT STUDIES (Credit variable) "^ ' "- ^ ' ''" 

lammarino, N. 

498,F TOPICS IN HEALTH EDUCATION (Credit variable) 

lammarino, N. 

498,S UNDERSTANDING CANCER (2-0-2) vr ia 

Examination of cancer from a biological, psychological and sociological perspective with 
emphasis on cancer epidemiology, prevention, and early detection. 

lammarino, N. 

■- - - •? 

;,.'■', .-l^X^^v , ■.,■,■. - ... , ^..-t. ... 



.U, 






" .- :■■; ;- /.^^/ .; ^ j 385 
Humanities 



Humanities Foundation Courses. These courses are designed to provide a 
wide-ranging, critical, and integrated introduction to the humanities. In small group 
discussions, occasional lectures, and their own essays, students will encounter 
enduring issues in Western civilization. For students planning a humanities major. 
Humanities 101-102 will provide an excellent foundation for advanced study; for 
other students these courses offer valuable contributions to general education. For this 
reason they are required of all science-engineering, architecture, and music majors. 

101,F INTRODUCTION TO HUMANITIES (3 3) 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.1 OR 1.2 

A study of representative works in the Western tradition in literature, philosophy, and history, 

from Homer to Chaucer. Discussion sections. 

A FOUNDATION COURSE. 

Stajf 

102,S INTRODUCTION TO HUMANITIES (3 3). 

*DI.STRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l OR 1.2 

Continued study, in discussion and occasional lectures, of representative works in the Western 

tradition, from Michelangelo to Martin Luther King. 

A FOUNDATION COURSE. 

Staff 

Joint Venture (Business and the Humanities). The Rice Joint Venture Program, 
sponsored by the Career Services Center, is designed to provide liberal arts majors the 
opportunity to explore their interests in a possible business career. Students accepted 
for the program will register for Humanities 30 1 , which will be offered in the fall and 
spring. The course is an introduction to business with emphasis on basic business 
concepts. As a part of the curriculum, each student will also do an internship with a 
Houston-area business organization during the semester. Students will gain an 
understanding of the business community while gaining valuable experience and 
contacts in the business world. 

301,F/S INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS (3 3) 

Prerequisite: prior acceptance to Joint Venture Internship program or permission of instructor. 
Preference given to humanities majors. 

Sanborn, R., Motherly, C. 



Major in Ancient Mediterranean Civilizations 

See page 168 for full description. 

Major in Asian Studies 

See page 213 for full description. 

Major in Medieval Studies 

See page xxx for full description. 

Major in The Study of Women and Gender 

See page xxx for full description. 



386 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Other Humanities Listings > a ~ 1 1 f ? fi 

201,S PUBLIC SPEAKING (3-0-3) 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Prerquisite: permission of instructor. -,/■ .,iy'."- ..''. '■->. 

Huston, D. 

211,F INTRODUCTION TO ASIAN CIVILIZATIONS (3-0-3) 
♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

Introduction to the great cultural traditions of Asia, past and present, with emphasis on evolving 
religious and philosophical traditions, artistic and literary achievements, and patterns of social 
change. Also offered as Hist 206 and Reli 211. 

Ms. Klein, Mr. Smith, Mr. Wilson 

230,S RETHINKING THE WESTERN TRADITION (3-0-3) 

This course, strongly oriented toward discussion, will be organized and structured around a 

series of seminal debates and conflicts in the history of ideas. Also offered as History 230. Not 

offered 1992-93. .. ., 

r. Wolin,R. 

270,F INTRODUCTION TO WOMEN'S STUDIES (3-0-3) 

♦DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY 1.2 

An introductory survey of issues in the study of women, including women ' s social, political and 

legal status in the U.S. and around the world; feminist perspectives on sexuality, gender, family 

and reproduction; and the implications of these perspectives for social and critical theory. 

Longino, H. 

305,F ADVANCED PUBLIC SPEAKING (3-0-3) 

Designed for students with at least two prior years of instruction of public speaking experience. 
Will address the ancient origins of speech theory and will require students to apply contemporary 
speech theory in the presentation of four in-class speeches. Permission of instructor. 

Fain, M. 

307,S ORAL INTERPRETATION/LITERATURE (3-0-3) 

Comprehensive study of oral interpretation theory and techniques applied to performance of 

dramatic, poetry, and prose literature. 

Fain, M. 

315,F WRITERS' GROUPS (1-0-1). 

Students meet weekly for one hour in groups of five or six to read aloud and comment on papers 
in progress. Students form groups and choose meeting times at the beginning of the semester. 
Writers may write on any academic subject (no movie or TV scripts, advertising, etc.) using 
assignments from other classes or projects of their own choice. A writing consultant attends 
meetings and keeps records of each group's progress. 

Driskill, L. 

316,S WRITERS' GROUPS (1-0-1). .nonqm^ob llu't ■ 

Same as 315. 

Driskill, L. 

317,F CONSULTING WITH STUDENT WRITERS (10 1) 

Excellent student writers prepare for working with other student writers by studying writing 
processes, writing problems, texts, and exercises and by role-playing. Lasts eight weeks. 

Driskill, L. 

318,S CONSULTING WITH STUDENT WRITERS (1-0-1) ^j^^jg ^, 

Same as 317. . n -» '-i. 

.ncijqiT'jr'ab Ilul lot xxx t Driskill, L. 



.. 387 

320,F INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL CULTURE (3-0-3). 

*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

An interdisciplinary course providing insights into the literature, art, philosophy, history, 
music, science, and cuisine of the Middle Ages, with guest lectures by specialists in various 
fields, slide lectures, and full-length films. Along the way we will also examine medieval 
Judaism, varying perspectives of chivalry and feudalism, forgery, the rights of the poor, and the 
role of medieval women. 

Chance, J. 

376,S GENDER AND SCIENCE (3 3) 
*DISTRIBUTION COURSE: CATEGORY I.l 

A review of contemporary scholarship on the experiences of women in the natural sciences, the 
role of gender in the sciences, women and technology, and feminist critiques of traditional 
approaches to scientific methodology. 

Longino. H. 

420,S INTEGRATIVE INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR (3-0 3) 
Senior seminar for students majoring in the study of women and gender. Topic varies yearly. 
Prerequisites: Huma 270 and four additional courses in the study of women and gender major. 

Staff 

495,F INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Study in a specific field of communication theory, requiring knowledge of advanced speech 
analysis and applications. 

...:,. Fain, M. 

495,S INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Study in a specific field of communication theory, requiring knowledge of advanced speech 
analysis and applications. 

L • Fain, M. 

496,F INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Study in a specific field of communication theory, requiring knowledge of advanced speech 
analysis and applications. 

Fain, M. 

496,S INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Study in a specific field of communication theory, requiring knowledge of advanced speech 
analysis and applications. 

Fain, M. 



388 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



Linguistics and Semiotics 



,, -, , „ Professor Copeland, C/?a/r 

Professors P.W. Davis, Lamb, and Tyler 

Associate Professors Polanyi and Urrutibeheity 

Visiting Assistant Professor Jack Martin 

Adjunct Professors C.F. Hocliett, E.D. Mitchell and S. Wallace 

Instructor Chen 

Adjunct Lecturer J.W. Baker 

Degrees Offered: B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Undergraduate Program. As language plays an important role throughout 
human life, linguistics is by its nature an interdisciplinary field. The undergraduate 
major thus includes at least two non-linguistics courses, chosen in accordance with an 
area of concentration. The major may be undertaken with any of three areas of 
concentration: Cognitive Science, Language, Textual Semiotics. All majors are 
required to take at least eight courses (24 semester hours) in linguistics, including at 
least the three core courses: 300 (Linguistic Analysis), 301 (Phonology), and (402) 
Syntax and Semantics. The remairting requirements depend on the student's area of 
concentration, as follows: YQIJT8 TVISQ/ISH^^.- 

Cognitive Science Concentration. Besides the three core courses, the eight 
required courses in linguistics must include at least two of the following: 306 
(Cognitive Linguistics), 315 (Information Structures), 317 (Computation for Lin- 
guists), 41 1 (Neurolinguistics) and 412 (Language and Intelligence). In addition, the 
major must include at least two courses (six semester hours) in cognitive studies in 
other departments, chosen in consultation with the undergraduate major adviser. 
Appropriate courses in other departments include relevant courses in anthropology, 
psychology, and computer science. 

Language Concentration. In addition to the eight required courses in linguistics, 
at least two semesters in a foreign language at the level of 300 or higher and two 
semesters in another language at the level of 200 or higher. Chinese and Sanskrit are 
especially recommended. 

Textual Semiotics Concentration. At least two semesters in a foreign language 
at the level of 300 or higher and at least two courses in textual semiotics. The latter, 
which may be counted among the eight required courses in linguistics, may be any two 
of the following: English 396 (Language and Philosophy in Literature), 414 
(Hermeneutics and Linguistic Anthropology), 420 (Literary Semiotics), 422 (Text and 
Context), and 490 (Discourse Analysis). 

In addition to the departmental requirements for the major, students must satisfy 
the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 60 semester hours outside 
the departmental requirements for a total program of at least 120 semester hours. See 
Degree Requirements and Majors, pages 68-90. 

Honors Program. The primary purpose of the Honors Program is to provide 
selected undergraduate majors with an opportunity to receive advanced training, 
particularly in the planning and execution of independent research within their chosen 
areas of specialization in linguistics. A secondary purpose of the program is to 



.. ,;- :o- , .. : . 389 

establish an administrative framework for the formal recognition of outstanding 
students. Majors considering a career in linguistics are strongly encouraged to apply, 
as are all others who desire the experience of an intensive, individual research project 
as part of their undergraduate education. 

Application to the Honors Program should be made in person to the undergraduate 
adviser no later than the tenth week of the second semester of a student's junior year. 
In support of the application, the student must prepare a brief description of the 
proposed research project signed by the faculty member who is to supervise the work. 
Acceptance into the program is at the discretion of the linguistics faculty. A statement 
of eligibility requirements and program requirements is available in the departmental 
office. 

Graduate Program. The graduate program admits students planning to study for 
the Ph.D. degree on a full-time basis. It is structured to ensure for each student a 
thorough grounding in general linguistics and a sound introduction to advanced 
research in some field of special interest. Linguistics at Rice is treated as an inherently 
interdisciplinary field, with connections not only to language and literature studies, but 
also to psychology, anthropology, computer science, and philosophy. Study of com- 
puter science enhances a student's career opportunities as well as his or her research 
skills. Semiotics, as practiced at Rice, is the still broader field resulting from the 
extension of the concepts and analytical tools of linguistics to the broader class of 
languagelike systems in general, including literary and artistic works and other 
products of human culture as well as information systems occurring in nature. 

Undergraduate preparation need not include linguistics courses as such but 
should include courses in at least two of the following areas: anthropology, cognitive 
science, computer science, electrical engineering, foreign languages, logic, discrete 
mathematics, philosophy, and psychology. Fellowships are available for especially 
well-qualified students. 

During the first year of residence, each entering graduate student will work closely 
with the linguistics graduate adviser to choose a plan of study congruent with the 
demands of the program and with his or her individual interests. Subsequent training 
is by course work, seminars, independent field study, and guided research. Students 
are encouraged to select areas of specialization that fit the research interests and 
activities of the faculty. 

All students are expected to acquire a command of general linguistics and to select 
one or two areas of concentration. Recommended areas of concentration are: 

Anthropological Linguistics Germanic Linguistics 

Cognitive Linguistics Romance Linguistics ' ' ':' • -j 

Computational Linguistics Semiotics "-,'-' ' ' 

English Linguistics 

At the end of the second semester of residence, each student is required to undergo 
an oral qualifying examination. The purpose of this examination is to assess the 
student's progress and potential as well as to identify areas of strengths and weak- 
nesses. Continuation to the second year requires satisfactory performance on this 
examination. Students who pass with distinction are urged to go on directly to the 
Ph.D. degree. Others are eligible for a master's degree upon completion of an 
appropriate thesis. 

Following successful completion of the qualifying examination, each student, on 
the basis of discussions with faculty members, and in accordance with his or her 
proposed area of concentration, selects a committee of advisers from among the 
faculty, typically a major adviser and two or three minor advisers. The major adviser 
will act as chairman of the committee. During the student's tenure in the program, the 



390 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

committee members serve as mentors and assist the student in designing an individu- 
ally tailored program of advanced studies and research. The composition of the 
committee can be changed at any time upon agreement between th